Perusing RailPictures.net


George Courtney
 

I was perusing RailPictures.net this evening and came upon a photo taken in 1955 of a Lehigh Valley twin hopper being rerailed at Pine Branch on the Interstate Railroad in s.w. Virgina.
I know Pine Branch had new coke ovens that year and would suspect that the Lehigh Valley car was being sent home with coke. Perhaps for Bethlehem Steel? But I was curious why it wound up in s.w. Virginia in the first place?
If anyone wants a look go to RailPictures.net and type in 1955. It's on page 2 or 3 iirc.

George Courtney


Brian Carlson
 

The "why" is probably pretty easy on this one. Someone down there needed a
load of Anthracite. Anthracite did travel.



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga, NY



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of gsc3
Sent: Friday, August 16, 2013 1:27 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Perusing RailPictures.net





I was perusing RailPictures.net this evening and came upon a photo taken in
1955 of a Lehigh Valley twin hopper being rerailed at Pine Branch on the
Interstate Railroad in s.w. Virgina.
I know Pine Branch had new coke ovens that year and would suspect that the
Lehigh Valley car was being sent home with coke. Perhaps for Bethlehem
Steel? But I was curious why it wound up in s.w. Virginia in the first
place?
If anyone wants a look go to RailPictures.net and type in 1955. It's on page
2 or 3 iirc.

George Courtney


al_brown03
 

Seems likely, unless this was the Flying Dutch Anthracite Load <g>
... but one might ask more specifically: (1) how far South was anthracite used for home heating? (2) how else was anthracite used? I'm not an expert on coal, and I wouldn't know where to look it up.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian Carlson" <prrk41361@...> wrote:

The "why" is probably pretty easy on this one. Someone down there needed a
load of Anthracite. Anthracite did travel.



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga, NY



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of gsc3
Sent: Friday, August 16, 2013 1:27 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Perusing RailPictures.net





I was perusing RailPictures.net this evening and came upon a photo taken in
1955 of a Lehigh Valley twin hopper being rerailed at Pine Branch on the
Interstate Railroad in s.w. Virgina.
I know Pine Branch had new coke ovens that year and would suspect that the
Lehigh Valley car was being sent home with coke. Perhaps for Bethlehem
Steel? But I was curious why it wound up in s.w. Virginia in the first
place?
If anyone wants a look go to RailPictures.net and type in 1955. It's on page
2 or 3 iirc.

George Courtney





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Charles Hostetler
 

--- In STMFC@..., "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

... but one might ask more specifically: (1) how far South was anthracite used for home heating? (2) how else was anthracite used? I'm not an expert on coal, and I wouldn't know where to look it up.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.
Hi Al,

(1) I have a scan of the 1954/54 West Palm Beach City Directory, which puts us in the correct era and pretty far south. The Guaranty Warehouse Co. had a display advertisement touting its delivery service of efficient clean-burning anthracite. This is just an example I happened to be working on recently, but it is not uncommon to see similar ads for coal dealers as you peruse city directories across the south (from the 50s).

(2) Advantages (relative to bituminous and lignite) are clean burning, low ash, high heat content, higher combustion temperature. Drawback was cost. Besides residential use, the most frequent occurrences I have seen were in smelting, high-temperature metallurgy, and chemical manufacturing. Most of the ordinary "gray-iron" foundries (which are fairly low temperature processes) tended to use bituminous or coke from what I've been able to tell.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler
Goshen Ind.


soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Hostetler" <cnw1045@...> wrote:


(2) Advantages (relative to bituminous and lignite) are clean burning, low ash, high heat content, higher combustion temperature. Drawback was cost...
Same general difference between bituminous and lignite. The Soo Line bought bituminous for locomotive coal, locally produced lignite for the depot stoves. Story has it that the operators were always begging a bucket of coal off the engine crews so they could get some heat out of the stoves on those cold winter nights.

Dennis


al_brown03
 

West Palm?!?!? Wow! I should hie me to UCF and look up Orlando.

AL B.

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Hostetler" <cnw1045@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "al_brown03" <abrown@> wrote:

... but one might ask more specifically: (1) how far South was anthracite used for home heating? (2) how else was anthracite used? I'm not an expert on coal, and I wouldn't know where to look it up.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.
Hi Al,

(1) I have a scan of the 1954/54 West Palm Beach City Directory, which puts us in the correct era and pretty far south. The Guaranty Warehouse Co. had a display advertisement touting its delivery service of efficient clean-burning anthracite. This is just an example I happened to be working on recently, but it is not uncommon to see similar ads for coal dealers as you peruse city directories across the south (from the 50s).

(2) Advantages (relative to bituminous and lignite) are clean burning, low ash, high heat content, higher combustion temperature. Drawback was cost. Besides residential use, the most frequent occurrences I have seen were in smelting, high-temperature metallurgy, and chemical manufacturing. Most of the ordinary "gray-iron" foundries (which are fairly low temperature processes) tended to use bituminous or coke from what I've been able to tell.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler
Goshen Ind.


Michael Aufderheide
 

Not to discount the interesting information on the use of hard coal in Florida (I echo the "West Palm!!!!") but it might be that the car was loaded off line. In the Monon conductor logs I've gone through, 8 of the 522 cars carrying coal were from anthracite roads, 2 from LV. These cars were loaded on Monon's Midland branch in SW Indiana with bituminous coal.

Of these 8 cars 6 were routed south to Louisville, 1 to Indianapolis, and one to Alida, Indiana for the B&O. Not a large percentage of the total cars, but an interesting variety.

For those of you that might be interested, 59 railroads are represented in the 522 cars. 135 of these are home road Monon cars: astondingly high, in my opinion, for a road that only had 1500 gons/hoppers at the time.

Best Regards,

Mike Aufderheide