Topics

outstanding article on freight cars


Tony Thompson
 

I've sent the following message to Railroad Model Craftsman:

Congratulations to author Mike Evans and to editor Chris D'Amato for the outstanding article on the tank car to covered hopper conversion in the September issue. It is clearly described, beautifully illustrated, and continues the RMC tradition of serious articles on freight car modeling. Great stuff! I'm looking forward to seeing more of it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Armand Premo
 

Ditto,Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2013 2:13 PM
Subject: [STMFC] outstanding article on freight cars

 

I've sent the following message to Railroad Model Craftsman:

Congratulations to author Mike Evans and to editor Chris D'Amato for the outstanding article on the tank car to covered hopper conversion in the September issue. It is clearly described, beautifully illustrated, and continues the RMC tradition of serious articles on freight car modeling. Great stuff! I'm looking forward to seeing more of it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


 

Tony – I agree.  I thought it was the best article of its type in decades. – Al Westerfield
 

Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2013 1:13 PM
Subject: [STMFC] outstanding article on freight cars
 
 

I've sent the following message to Railroad Model Craftsman:

Congratulations to author Mike Evans and to editor Chris D'Amato for the outstanding article on the tank car to covered hopper conversion in the September issue. It is clearly described, beautifully illustrated, and continues the RMC tradition of serious articles on freight car modeling. Great stuff! I'm looking forward to seeing more of it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Bill Schneider
 

At the risk of jumping in on a “me too” post… Me too!



In fact, there are two freight car articles in a row if you consider the continuing DL&W/C&IM caboose series.



In the spirit of equal coverage, I could also point out that there are no fewer than ten pages in another monthly publication devoted to techniques to install couplers on said freight cars…..



Bill Schneider





From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of westerfieldalfred@frontier.com
Sent: Thursday, September 5, 2013 3:02 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] outstanding article on freight cars





Tony – I agree. I thought it was the best article of its type in decades. – Al Westerfield



From: Tony Thompson <mailto:tony@signaturepress.com>

Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2013 1:13 PM

To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com

Subject: [STMFC] outstanding article on freight cars





I've sent the following message to Railroad Model Craftsman:

Congratulations to author Mike Evans and to editor Chris D'Amato for the outstanding article on the tank car to covered hopper conversion in the September issue. It is clearly described, beautifully illustrated, and continues the RMC tradition of serious articles on freight car modeling. Great stuff! I'm looking forward to seeing more of it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Tony Thompson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, September 05, 2013 2:13 PM
Subject: [STMFC] outstanding article on freight cars


I've sent the following message to Railroad Model Craftsman:

Congratulations to author Mike Evans and to editor Chris D'Amato
for the outstanding article on the tank car to covered hopper
conversion in the September issue. It is clearly described,
beautifully illustrated, and continues the RMC tradition of serious
articles on freight car modeling. Great stuff! I'm looking forward to
seeing more of it.
Agreed all around, Tony. I rarely by model magazines anymore
because so much of what they offer is repititious, especially anything coming out of Kalmbach. But the latest RMC was purchased for the very reason you point out. RMC has done a far better job over the
years of presenting such useful material. Is this not the same car type that ws discussed briefly here a month or so ago as well? With
Ted Culotta now find his circumstances improving to the point that he is re-introducing Speedwitch Media we can hope that RMC, and the rest of us, will also be able to benefit from his "Essential Freight Car" articles once again as well.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Tom Madden
 

There's a color photo of two of the Barrett granulated slate tank/hoppers on the last page of the Gerard Bernet soft-cover book, Memories of Eastern Pennsylvania Railroading. The caption says 1959, and it's somewhere in PRR electrified territory, in train behind a P5a motor and in front of two PRR hoppers. I guess that means Bruce will need a couple...
 
Agree with Tony - it's a great article.
 
Tom Madden


Scott
 

I saw this on the rack at the hobby store today and checked out the article.  


I bought the magazine after reading just the first part of the article! 


Well done!  



--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

I've sent the following message to Railroad Model Craftsman:

Congratulations to author Mike Evans and to editor Chris D'Amato for the outstanding article on the tank car to covered hopper conversion in the September issue. It is clearly described, beautifully illustrated, and continues the RMC tradition of serious articles on freight car modeling. Great stuff! I'm looking forward to seeing more of it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Michael Evans
 

Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop article, it is appreciated.

I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these cars, if anybody has any info.

From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that some showed up on the PENN.

I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.

Thanks for any info,
Mike Evans


Armand Premo
 

Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you.                                                                        You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:58 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars

 


Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop article, it is appreciated.

I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these cars, if anybody has any info.

From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that some showed up on the PENN.

I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.

Thanks for any info,
Mike Evans


al_brown03
 

I don't suppose they shipped that stuff to Florida?

 

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla. 


--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you.                                                                        You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:58 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars

 


Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop article, it is appreciated.

I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these cars, if anybody has any info.

From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that some showed up on the PENN.

I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.

Thanks for any info,
Mike Evans


Don Burn
 

This brings up an interest question on covered hoppers in general. In the
late 1940's and early 1950's how likely were you to see a car on other than
a specific route. It looks like an awful lot of the early cars were private
owner so I assume probably serviced a limited number of places. Armand, in
general do you see covered hoppers in your wheel reports? And what are the
chances of seeing a covered hopper in a random freight train in northern New
England, or a lot of other places in the country?

Don Burn

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Armand Premo
Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 5:05 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars



Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was
back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article
gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you.
You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather
sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet
to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to
help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also
expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo


Charles Hostetler
 

I posted some data from a passing report taken at Newberry Junction on the NYC.  It is a bit later than the period that Don was asking about (August 1956).  For this little snapshot, 61 of 1098 identifiable cars (5.6%) were covered hoppers.  None were privately owned.  Most were regional (B&O, CNJ, LNE, NYC, PRR, RDG), one was from Canada (CP), and one was SSW.  The report covered loaded cars and loaded and empty tank cars.  


Those interested can find the data here:


http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2013/09/covered-hoppers-at-newberry-junction.html


Regards,


Charles Hostetler




--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

This brings up an interest question on covered hoppers in general. In the
late 1940's and early 1950's how likely were you to see a car on other than
a specific route. It looks like an awful lot of the early cars were private
owner so I assume probably serviced a limited number of places. Armand, in
general do you see covered hoppers in your wheel reports? And what are the
chances of seeing a covered hopper in a random freight train in northern New
England, or a lot of other places in the country?

Don Burn


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Armand Premo
Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 5:05 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars



Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was
back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article
gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you.
You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather
sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet
to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to
help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also
expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo


Benjamin Hom
 

Don Burn asked:
"This brings up an interest question on covered hoppers in general. In the
late 1940's and early 1950's how likely were you to see a car on other than
a specific route. It looks like an awful lot of the early cars were private
owner so I assume probably serviced a limited number of places. Armand, in
general do you see covered hoppers in your wheel reports? And what are the
chances of seeing a covered hopper in a random freight train in northern New
England, or a lot of other places in the country?"
 
Don, out of from the records from Armand's collection that I've analyzed, only 27 covered hoppers out of 5,474 total freight cars - 3 B&O, 1 N&W, 16 NYC, and 7 SHPX.
 
 
Ben Hom


Armand Premo
 

Ben,I have yet to do a thorough analysis ,but a quick overview shows very few.I have just opened another bundle and it may take a few days to have an answer.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 1:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars

 

Don Burn asked:
"This brings up an interest question on covered hoppers in general. In the
late 1940's and early 1950's how likely were you to see a car on other than
a specific route. It looks like an awful lot of the early cars were private
owner so I assume probably serviced a limited number of places. Armand, in
general do you see covered hoppers in your wheel reports? And what are the
chances of seeing a covered hopper in a random freight train in northern New
England, or a lot of other places in the country?"
 
Don, out of from the records from Armand's collection that I've analyzed, only 27 covered hoppers out of 5,474 total freight cars - 3 B&O, 1 N&W, 16 NYC, and 7 SHPX.
 
 
Ben Hom


Tony Thompson
 

Don Burn wrote:

 

This brings up an interest question on covered hoppers in general. In the late 1940's and early 1950's how likely were you to see a car on other than a specific route. It looks like an awful lot of the early cars were private owner so I assume probably serviced a limited number of places. 


      I don't think the private ownership statement is correct. Numerous private owners possessed a handful of cars each in the 1953 ORER, with only two big owners, SHPX having about 900 and GACX having less than 500 more. Meanwhile, ATSF owned 1450 cars; UP, about 1000 cars; and SP + T&NO, about 1350. That's just three railroads.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Dennis Storzek
 

 


      I don't think the private ownership statement is correct. Numerous private owners possessed a handful of cars each in the 1953 ORER, with only two big owners, SHPX having about 900 and GACX having less than 500 more. Meanwhile, ATSF owned 1450 cars; UP, about 1000 cars; and SP + T&NO, about 1350. That's just three railroads.

Tony Thompson

I tend to agree with Tony on this. The early use of covered hoppers seems to be cement service, and almost all were railroad owned. That's not to say they didn't repeatedly hail loads for a small number of customers, after all, they were bought to protect a specific business, but they could be routed wherever those customers shipped.

Early use of bigger covered hoppers as grain cars, while really beyond the cut-off date of this list, seemed to follow the same pattern; railroad owned cars purchased to protect a specific market segment.

Where private ownership was common was with specially equipped cars, such as cars with food grade linings. In the past the railroads had supplied the car, but the customer supplied the food contact lining; cloth bags or paper in the case of flour loading. Note this doesn't apply to grain, because grain doesn't require a special lining until it's milled into flour. I suspect the railroads could just envision the damage claims they'd have every time the shipper made a claim fora contaminated load, and baulked at being responsible for the linings. Thus, the vast majority of privately owned covered hoppers during our time frame were specially lined cars such as Air-slide cars.

Dennis Storzek


Aley, Jeff A
 

Well, it all depends on what you mean by “random”.  If you’re modeling a bridge route, you may see regular covered hopper traffic between offline shipper / consignee pairs.  For example, the UP carried covered hoppers of soda ash from Wyoming to Kansas (among other places).

 

Cement traffic appears to be much more localized (in Kansas, at least).  Alfalfa pellets (for animal feed) were also handled in covered hoppers in KS, and shipped to stockyards as far away as Omaha, and perhaps farther.

 

My point is that if you’re modeling a line that is between a producer and a consumer, you’ll need some.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Don Burn
Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 9:08 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars

 

 

This brings up an interest question on covered hoppers in general. In the
late 1940's and early 1950's how likely were you to see a car on other than
a specific route. It looks like an awful lot of the early cars were private
owner so I assume probably serviced a limited number of places. Armand, in
general do you see covered hoppers in your wheel reports? And what are the
chances of seeing a covered hopper in a random freight train in northern New
England, or a lot of other places in the country?

Don Burn

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Armand Premo
Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 5:05 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars

Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was
back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article
gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you.
You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather
sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet
to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to
help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also
expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo


al_brown03
 

To speculate about my own question: it occurs to me that my own roof uses this very material. Whether it's shipped here *by Barrett* is another question.

AL B.


Michael Evans
 

Armand,
This is what Andy pulled from his records, it is from Jan, Feb & Mar 1953. This batch was the only one he has checked so far. They were interchanged between D&H and Rut at Rouses Point.

1/7, BMX843, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, IL, Slate Granuals
2/5, BMX803, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals
2/22, BMX803, fr Blue Island, Il, to Poultney, Vt, mty
3/3, BMX803, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slale Granuals
3/24, BMX860, fr Blue Island, IL to Poultney Vt, mty
3/31, BMX860, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals

Remember, these cars did not go into service until 1949.
Hope this helps,
Mike Evans

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Armand Premo" <armprem2@...> wrote:

Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you. You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: Michael Evans
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:58 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars




Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop article, it is appreciated.

I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these cars, if anybody has any info.

From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that some showed up on the PENN.

I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.

Thanks for any info,
Mike Evans


Armand Premo
 

Thank you Mike.Just what the doctor ordered.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2013 9:14 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars

 


Armand,
This is what Andy pulled from his records, it is from Jan, Feb & Mar 1953. This batch was the only one he has checked so far. They were interchanged between D&H and Rut at Rouses Point.

1/7, BMX843, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, IL, Slate Granuals
2/5, BMX803, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals
2/22, BMX803, fr Blue Island, Il, to Poultney, Vt, mty
3/3, BMX803, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slale Granuals
3/24, BMX860, fr Blue Island, IL to Poultney Vt, mty
3/31, BMX860, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals

Remember, these cars did not go into service until 1949.
Hope this helps,
Mike Evans

--- In STMFC@..., "Armand Premo" wrote:
>
> Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you. You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Michael Evans
> To: STMFC@...
> Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:58 PM
> Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars
>
>
>
>
> Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop article, it is appreciated.
>
> I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these cars, if anybody has any info.
>
> From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that some showed up on the PENN.
>
> I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.
>
> Thanks for any info,
> Mike Evans
>