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Linseed Oil and the New Tangent Tank Car


Charles Hostetler
 

Good Afternoon All,


I gathered some information about linseed oil to support modeling part of that commodity flow as through traffic across my layout.  The majority of rail shipments of linseed originated in Minnesota and terminated at end use facilities located across most of the U.S.  Those interested can find the post here:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2013/10/commodity-flow-of-linseed-oil.html

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Aley, Jeff A
 

Charles,

 

               Very interesting, and well-researched, as usual.  It is interesting that the majority of the traffic was shipped in 8K gal tank cars, which I infer were single-compartment cars.

 

In my case, I don’t model a source of linseed oil, but I do plan to model a destination.  The Great Western Paint Mfg Co. was headquartered in Kansas City, MO (in the West Bottoms) and served by the UP.

 

               For those listmembers who may also have a paint factory on their layouts, the brochure at the following link contains (on pp.22-23) info on the paint manufacturing process in the late 1920’s.  I imagine [please correct me] that the process was similar in the 1950’s. 

 

https://archive.org/details/GreatWesternPaintCatalog1929

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of cnw1045@...
Sent: Thursday, October 24, 2013 1:21 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Linseed Oil and the New Tangent Tank Car

 

 

Good Afternoon All,

 

I gathered some information about linseed oil to support modeling part of that commodity flow as through traffic across my layout.  The majority of rail shipments of linseed originated in Minnesota and terminated at end use facilities located across most of the U.S.  Those interested can find the post here:

 

 

Regards,

 

Charles Hostetler


Charles Hostetler
 

Jeff Aley  wrote:

"It is interesting that the majority of the traffic was shipped in 8K gal tank cars, which I infer were single-compartment cars."   and


"I imagine [please correct me] that the process was similar in the 1950’s."


Hi Jeff,


There were some 8,000-gallon multicompartment cars.  I am in the middle of compiling a roster from the Jan. 1958 ORER of the cars that are specifically called out as multicompartment cars (I am aware that the list will not be exhaustive, but its a place to start).  More importantly, I was trying to get across the idea of the volume distribution of the shipments and the fact that for linseed oil there was a substantial number of shipments in the lower volume (6K gallons or less) tail of the distribution.  You don't see that for every commodity class that was shipped in tank cars and to me it was indicative that multi compartment (or smaller single-compartment) tank cars were used for a non-negligable amount of linseed oil shipments.  


As to the second point, no correction is needed, and the brochure describes a paint manufacturing process that was in use in the 1950s.  On the production side, the 1950s saw an increasing use of solvent based extraction and much larger hydraulic presses at the linseed mills, but the basic process of making paint from linseed oil and pigments was unchanged.  Cool brochure!


Regards,


Charles Hostetler



---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Charles,

 

               Very interesting, and well-researched, as usual.  It is interesting that the majority of the traffic was shipped in 8K gal tank cars, which I infer were single-compartment cars.

 

In my case, I don’t model a source of linseed oil, but I do plan to model a destination.  The Great Western Paint Mfg Co. was headquartered in Kansas City, MO (in the West Bottoms) and served by the UP.

 

               For those listmembers who may also have a paint factory on their layouts, the brochure at the following link contains (on pp.22-23) info on the paint manufacturing process in the late 1920’s.  I imagine [please correct me] that the process was similar in the 1950’s. 

 

https://archive.org/details/GreatWesternPaintCatalog1929

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of cnw1045@...
Sent: Thursday, October 24, 2013 1:21 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Linseed Oil and the New Tangent Tank Car

 

 

Good Afternoon All,

 

I gathered some information about linseed oil to support modeling part of that commodity flow as through traffic across my layout.  The majority of rail shipments of linseed originated in Minnesota and terminated at end use facilities located across most of the U.S.  Those interested can find the post here:

 

 

Regards,

 

Charles Hostetler


nvrr49@...
 

 "In my case, I don’t model a source of linseed oil, but I do plan to model a destination.  The Great Western Paint Mfg Co. was headquartered in Kansas City, MO (in the West Bottoms) and served by the UP.

               For those listmembers who may also have a paint factory on their layouts, the brochure at the following link contains (on pp.22-23) info on the paint manufacturing process in the late 1920’s.  I imagine [please correct me] that the process was similar in the 1950’s. 

 

https://archive.org/details/GreatWesternPaintCatalog1929

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff"


Jeff, you are probably closer to a linseed oil plant that you thought.  Fredonia Kansas had a linseed oil plant in the 1920's and 30's.  The Fredonia Linseed Oil Works advertised in the Frisco Railroad company magazine for several years in the 1920's.  If you are interested, send me an email off list, and I will send you the meager information I have.  I actually made a trip to Fredonia to their museum, but they had very little information.  



---In stmfc@..., <cnw1045@...> wrote:

Jeff Aley  wrote:

"It is interesting that the majority of the traffic was shipped in 8K gal tank cars, which I infer were single-compartment cars."   and


"I imagine [please correct me] that the process was similar in the 1950’s."


Hi Jeff,


There were some 8,000-gallon multicompartment cars.  I am in the middle of compiling a roster from the Jan. 1958 ORER of the cars that are specifically called out as multicompartment cars (I am aware that the list will not be exhaustive, but its a place to start).  More importantly, I was trying to get across the idea of the volume distribution of the shipments and the fact that for linseed oil there was a substantial number of shipments in the lower volume (6K gallons or less) tail of the distribution.  You don't see that for every commodity class that was shipped in tank cars and to me it was indicative that multi compartment (or smaller single-compartment) tank cars were used for a non-negligable amount of linseed oil shipments.  


As to the second point, no correction is needed, and the brochure describes a paint manufacturing process that was in use in the 1950s.  On the production side, the 1950s saw an increasing use of solvent based extraction and much larger hydraulic presses at the linseed mills, but the basic process of making paint from linseed oil and pigments was unchanged.  Cool brochure!


Regards,


Charles Hostetler



---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Charles,

 

               Very interesting, and well-researched, as usual.  It is interesting that the majority of the traffic was shipped in 8K gal tank cars, which I infer were single-compartment cars.

 

In my case, I don’t model a source of linseed oil, but I do plan to model a destination.  The Great Western Paint Mfg Co. was headquartered in Kansas City, MO (in the West Bottoms) and served by the UP.

 

               For those listmembers who may also have a paint factory on their layouts, the brochure at the following link contains (on pp.22-23) info on the paint manufacturing process in the late 1920’s.  I imagine [please correct me] that the process was similar in the 1950’s. 

 

https://archive.org/details/GreatWesternPaintCatalog1929

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of cnw1045@...
Sent: Thursday, October 24, 2013 1:21 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Linseed Oil and the New Tangent Tank Car

 

 

Good Afternoon All,

 

I gathered some information about linseed oil to support modeling part of that commodity flow as through traffic across my layout.  The majority of rail shipments of linseed originated in Minnesota and terminated at end use facilities located across most of the U.S.  Those interested can find the post here:

 

 

Regards,

 

Charles Hostetler