Constructing Freight Cars In 1900


thecitrusbelt@...
 

Courtesy of the USC Digital Archives, here is a link to an image of a freight car “assembly line” in Los Angeles (possibly Southern Pacific shops?) in 1900.

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15799coll65/id/11565/rec/89

 

Use the slider above the image to enlarge it.

 

There also is a good end view of an early T&NO box car.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 


Dennis Storzek
 

It might be an assembly line, but I douvt it is "constructing freight cars." More likely it's a rebuild program, possibly adding steel center sills. Note the cars in the background have varying degrees of damage; one has the end pushed out, likely indicating broken end posts, while the car directly behind the wagon has a sheet iron patch on the corner. The third car back on that track is way up in the air, likely on horses, and is the likely recipient of that steel centersill / bolster assembly.

There was an interesting article in the Soo Line Historical & Technical Society magazine about twenty years ago about rebuilding cars of the same era. The work was jobbed out to Manitowoc Shipbuilding.  That firm had both the wood and metal working skills to do the job, but not much track. They did, however, have lots of acreage serviced by traveling cranes, so as the rolled the cars into the program, they lifted the bodies off the trucks, then flew them out into the yard, setting the bodies in rows on horses. The trucks were gathered up and taken to the blacksmith shop for rebuilding, and later reunited with the finished bodies.

Dennis


 

Bob – The lumber door is typical of Santa Fe practice.  As was rebuilding truss rod cars with steel channel center sills.  Series Bx. W, X and Y were built new this way. – Al Westerfield
 

Sent: Monday, December 09, 2013 12:34 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Constructing Freight Cars In 1900
 
 

Courtesy of the USC Digital Archives, here is a link to an image of a freight car “assembly line” in Los Angeles (possibly Southern Pacific shops?) in 1900.

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15799coll65/id/11565/rec/89

 

Use the slider above the image to enlarge it.

 

There also is a good end view of an early T&NO box car.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 


riverob@...
 

The car end closest to the camera is T&NO 3xx22.  Car to the left is SP (can't read the 5-digit number)

Sharp photo, thanks.


Robert Simpson




---In STMFC@..., <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote:

Courtesy of the USC Digital Archives, here is a link to an image of a freight car “assembly line” in Los Angeles (possibly Southern Pacific shops?) in 1900.

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15799coll65/id/11565/rec/89

 

Use the slider above the image to enlarge it.

 

There also is a good end view of an early T&NO box car.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 


David Allen
 

Folks:  According to Thompson Freight Cars vol 4 the car, T&NO 3xx22 is likely a 

CS-31 built c1902, series 31150-31499, 300 cars. And note that it has both side 

and end grab irons; it was likely built with solely side grab irons, the end grabs 

being installed about 1911.  And the siding is pretty "weathered," suggesting 

quite a few years of service. (Note the 6" board serving as the upper end door, 

for example).  I suggest the date of the photo is possibly 1915-1920.


Dave A.



---In STMFC@..., <riverob@...> wrote:  The car end closest to the camera is T&NO 3xx22.

      Car to the left is SP (can't read the 5-digit number)


Robert Simpson

---In STMFC@..., <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote:

<<<snip>>>

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15799coll65/id/11565/rec/89

 




David Allen
 

Folks:

According to Thompson, Southern Pacific Freight Cars vol 4 Box Cars
T&N) 3xx22 is likely a CS-31, built by AC&F in c1902 as part of T&NO
series 31150-31499. But the car is pretty well "weathered" (note the
6" board being used as the upper end door) suggesting quite a few years
of service. And the car was likely built with only side grab irons,
with end grabs being added c1911. I suggest the photo was taken in
around 1915 or so.

Be well. Dave A.



Prior Messages-----
Posted by: "Robert Simpson" riverob@...

The car end closest to the camera is T&NO 3xx22.  Car to the left is SP (can't read the 5-digit number)

and ---
Posted by: "Bob Chaparro"
12/ 9/2013

Courtesy of the USC Digital Archives, here is a link to an image of a
freight car “assembly line” in Los Angeles (possibly Southern Pacific
shops?) in 1900.
 http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15799coll65/id/11565/rec/89
 


Tim O'Connor
 


looks like SP 80923

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/ajaxhelper/?CISOROOT=p15799coll65&CISOPTR=11565&action=2&DMSCALE=60&DMWIDTH=5000&DMHEIGHT=5000

looks like an open air repair shed. T&NO had a smaller one in Hearne TX
that lasted into the 1970's if not later

Tim O'Connor





The car end closest to the camera is T&NO 3xx22.  Car to the left is SP (can't read the 5-digit number)

Sharp photo, thanks.

Robert Simpson

---In STMFC@..., wrote:

Courtesy of the USC Digital Archives, here is a link to an image of a freight car assembly line in Los Angeles (possibly Southern Pacific shops?) in 1900.

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15799coll65/id/11565/rec/89

Use the slider above the image to enlarge it.

There also is a good end view of an early T&NO box car.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA