Rutland RR Box Car red


robertb@smartchat.net.au
 

Does any one on the list know what paint would best represent the shade of box car red used by the Rutland RR in the post WW2 period?

Regards,

Robert Bogie


 

According to Funaro & Camerlengo, The Rutland's Freight Car color was called Cherry. They call for a 50/50 mix of Floquil Box Car Red and Caboose Red (The bright version).

Rich Christie


On Tuesday, December 24, 2013 4:23 PM, Robert Bogie wrote:
 
Does any one on the list know what paint would best represent the shade
of box car red used by the Rutland RR in the post WW2 period?

Regards,

Robert Bogie



Charles Hladik
 

 
Robert And Rich,
   Several photos that fellow Rutland Railroad Historical Society member Bill Badger sent me show a wide variation in colors from almost an orange to what looks like Floquil BCR. The vans (cabeese) were NYC FC red  or later almost Floquil caboose red (cherry).
Merry Christmas
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division

In a message dated 12/24/2013 5:34:43 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, rhcdmc@... writes:
 

According to Funaro & Camerlengo, The Rutland's Freight Car color was called Cherry. They call for a 50/50 mix of Floquil Box Car Red and Caboose Red (The bright version).

Rich Christie


On Tuesday, December 24, 2013 4:23 PM, Robert Bogie wrote:
 
Does any one on the list know what paint would best represent the shade
of box car red used by the Rutland RR in the post WW2 period?

Regards,

Robert Bogie



Phillip Blancher <pblancher@...>
 

Hi Robert,

Paint varied from batch to batch and depending on when the cars were
painted, weathered differently. RRHS Member Bill Badger wrote a paint
guide in the Winter 1996(Vol 8, No 4) issue of "The Newsliner", the
Rutland Railroad Historical Society magazine. Bill also spoke to this
at length at the 2013 RRHS Annual Convention, which was held in
Burlington Vermont. The back issues is available to purchase from the
RRHS website (http://www.rutlandrr.org) and I can email Bill after
Christmas to see if he can forward a copy of his Powerpoint
presentation from the convention.

Cheers, and Merry Christmas!

Phillip

--
Phillip Blancher - Membership Chair
Rutland Railroad Historical Society
http://www.rutlandrr.org

--
Phillip Blancher
http://about.me/phillipblancher

On Tue, Dec 24, 2013 at 5:23 PM, Robert Bogie <robertb@...> wrote:
Does any one on the list know what paint would best represent the shade
of box car red used by the Rutland RR in the post WW2 period?

Regards,

Robert Bogie


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links



robertb@smartchat.net.au
 

Hi Phillip,

Thanks for your reply. I do have that issue of the Newsliner. It was one of the 66 back issues of the Newsliner that I obtained very recently, but with that quantity I haven't been able to through them all yet in detail. When I got it out and read the article, itf was very helpful regarding prototype info, but didn't cover the model paints. Since it mentioned in the article it was part one, I did a search and found part two in the Summer 1997(Vol 9, No 2) issue. Since these articles were published in 1996/1997, a lot has changed in the model paints available.

I read in these articles (and elsewhere) that the Rutland used to source its paint supply contracts through the NYC up until around 1950. So, I think the best choice is the follow the Rutland practice and use the shade of box car red as used on the NYC in this period. By chance, after I sent my question, I saw that Tru-Color Paint is now offering a shade of box car red they describe as NYC 1945-50's Freight Car Red (stock # 221). I've sent them an email requesting a pdf copy of their colour chart, so it'll be interesting to see how this compares to colour photos of the Rutland's box cars. I have ordered quite a few of the Westerfield Rutland 8000 & 9000 series box car kits, so if the Tru-Color paint looks good, it will save having to mix other paints to get a suitable match to paint these models.

If Bill has his power point presentation from the convention, I would certainly like to see it. It would be interesting to see what he has learned since his article in the 1990's.

Regards,

Robert Bogie

On 25/12/2013 12:02 PM, Phillip Blancher wrote:
 

Hi Robert,

Paint varied from batch to batch and depending on when the cars were
painted, weathered differently. RRHS Member Bill Badger wrote a paint
guide in the Winter 1996(Vol 8, No 4) issue of "The Newsliner", the
Rutland Railroad Historical Society magazine. Bill also spoke to this
at length at the 2013 RRHS Annual Convention, which was held in
Burlington Vermont. The back issues is available to purchase from the
RRHS website (http://www.rutlandrr.org) and I can email Bill after
Christmas to see if he can forward a copy of his Powerpoint
presentation from the convention.

Cheers, and Merry Christmas!

Phillip

--
Phillip Blancher - Membership Chair
Rutland Railroad Historical Society
http://www.rutlandrr.org

--
Phillip Blancher
http://about.me/phillipblancher

On Tue, Dec 24, 2013 at 5:23 PM, Robert Bogie wrote:
> Does any one on the list know what paint would best represent the shade
> of box car red used by the Rutland RR in the post WW2 period?
>
> Regards,
>
> Robert Bogie
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>



Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Rich C <rhcdmc@...> wrote:

According to Funaro & Camerlengo, The Rutland's Freight Car color was called Cherry. They call for a 50/50 mix of Floquil Box Car Red and Caboose Red (The bright version).

Rich Christie

Steve Funaro is definitely out to lunch on this one. While some,
and ceertainly not all, of the Rutland cabeese were repainted in a
much brighter red in the late 1940's and early 1950's until the
cabeese began to be painted in the green and yellow of the diesels
and new Pullman-Standard PS-1 boxcars calling it "cherry" red might
be a bit of a stretch from the color photos I've seen over the years.
Additionally, in the 1960's and 1970's there were a lot of double sheathed Rutland 36 ft. and 40 ft. box cars around in various places around the system. I do not recall ever seeing one in the brighter red used on some of the cabeese, though I woould not conclude that it never happened. I would, however, conclude that it is highly unlikely. I'll try to find and post a photo of the Rutland 40 ft.
boxcar retored by the Strasburg R.R. which is probably as close a match as I have seen to what the survivors of the early 1970's looked like. This may be closer to an oxide red than anything else.

Cordially, Don Valentine