car tire weights


Bill Lane
 

I have been working on some of my plastic cars. If you need to add some weight to your cars I found this seller with a **great** price on car tire weights.  http://www.ebay.com/itm/290964717446  Shipping is included!

 

10 POUNDS will go a long way.

 

These are ½ ounce size but they do have ¼ ounce too. These are not lead. I sort of liked the lead weights.

 

Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy & PRSL in 1957 in S Scale since 1987

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Douglas Harding
 

Bill I went to my local tire dealer, had him order extra boxes of stick on weights ½ and ¼ oz the next time he placed an order. They came on his delivery truck with a couple of weeks, I had no shipping charges. Got them a lot cheaper than your ebay merchant who is offering “free” shipping.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Tim O'Connor
 

Bill,

Seriously? Did you receive anything from this seller? A flat-rate priority mail
package across the country costs $40! How can he sell you 10 lbs of weights for
$30 and make any money??

By the way, I usually pay $1 each for 3 oz strips (12 pcs) at local train shows.
I'm sure auto garages and tire shops pay a fraction as much in bulk. That's more
than this Ebay seller is asking per pound, but it sure looks fishy.

Tim O'Connor




I have been working on some of my plastic cars. If you need to add some weight to your cars I found this seller with a **great** price on car tire weights.  http://www.ebay.com/itm/290964717446  Shipping is included!
 
10 POUNDS will go a long way.
 
These are � ounce size but they do have � ounce too. These are not lead. I sort of liked the lead weights.
 
Thank You,
Bill Lane


rick@...
 


Tim said:


"A flat-rate priority mail package across the country costs $40! How can he sell you 10 lbs of weights for $30 and make any money??"



Good thing Tim isn't a shipping consultant ;).


A USPS Priority Mail small flat rate box can be filled with up to 70#, and I'm pretty sure it would hold 10# of weights. From my shop here in far northern MN to, say, S. California the postage is less than $6. The next bigger box is $12.35. I think you saw the Priority Express, 1-2 day guaranteed option.


Peace, Rick Aylsworth


Tim O'Connor
 

Yes, Rick, I looked at the express rate.

On the other hand I mailed a package recently to Intermountain (about 4 lbs)
and it cost me $14... Parcel Post no less. They really whack you on packages
that are larger than 12" on a side.

Today I received a package of cookies from my niece. I saw the mailman fling
the box from his truck onto my porch -- about 10 feet! Good thing is wasn't a
package of light bulbs. (I ordered some of those recently from Amazon -- two
thirds were broken on arrival. UPS in that case.)

Tim O'

Good thing Tim isn't a shipping consultant ;).

A USPS Priority Mail small flat rate box can be filled with up to 70#, and I'm pretty sure it would hold 10# of weights. From my shop here in far northern MN to, say, S. California the postage is less than $6. The next bigger box is $12.35. I think you saw the Priority Express, 1-2 day guaranteed option.

Peace, Rick Aylsworth


David Stickney
 

I have gotten more than I need free by checking near bad (uneven causing car to go bump)  rr crossings. Also, bike riding is good for the soul and spotting weights.

Weights frequently fall off cars and soon they will be falling left and right from the holes in roads created by plows.
David

 
David Stickney Red Bluff, CA


Bob Sterner
 

I dropped by the neighborhood service center a few years ago and asked if they had any leftover used tire weights.  I got a 5-gal pail half full of them for free.  It seemed like the mechanic was glad to get rid of them.

Bob Sterner
St. Paul, MN


Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Bill Lane" <bill@...> wrote:

I have been working on some of my plastic cars. If you need to add some
weight to your cars I found this seller with a **great** price on car tire
weights. http://www.ebay.com/itm/290964717446 Shipping is included!

10 POUNDS will go a long way.

These are ½ ounce size but they do have ¼ ounce too. These are not lead. I
sort of liked the lead weights.

Thank You,
Bill Lane
In all honesty I find the best use for tire weights is to melt them down and use them to cast bullets. Anything from .256 caliber to 69 cal. round ball muzzle loading ammo. For car weights lead flashing is a far better material. It is not that expensive and can be had a good building supply firms, especially those catering to brick masons.

Cordially, Don Valentine


caboose9792@aol.com <caboose9792@...>
 

Lead products are a hazerdous materels. Saved the shop from paying for disposal.

Mark rickert- cold nights like tonight remind me why i dont work in train service anymore.

Sent with Verizon Mobile Email

---Original Message---
From: STMFC@...
Sent: 12/30/2013 3:42 pm
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] car tire weights

I dropped by the neighborhood service center a few years ago and asked if they had any leftover used tire weights. I got a 5-gal pail half full of them for free. It seemed like the mechanic was glad to get rid of them. Bob SternerSt. Paul, MN


Douglas Harding
 

Someone asked me off list, how much the weights I mentioned cost per oz. I purchased them at the local Goodyear store. The manufacture is Grey Products Corp of Wis. The box of ¼ oz stick on weights was marked $15.79 or 18 cents per oz. It contains 30 strips of 12 ¼ oz weights. The full box weights 5.65lbs. And the box of ½ oz stick on weights was $28.73 or 16 cents per oz. It contains 30 strips of 12 ½ oz weights. The full box weighs 11.25lbs. This was standard “retail” price, but no shipping on almost 18lbs. I thought it was a bargain compared to the cost of the A Line stick on weights at the hobby shop. Walthers is asking $7.50 for 2 strips of the ¼ oz weights, or $1.25 per oz.

 

I too have gotten a bucket of old used lead tire weights from the local gas station. They required a lot of cleaning, then cutting to the size I needed, including removing the steel “clamp”, which often would not fit into the car body. And I still had to figure out how to make then stick in whatever car I was building. The purchased stick on weights, have an adhesive pad on one side, are uniform in size and lay flat. They are very convenient to use, and I my opinion well worth the money.

 

I know a number of people just use pennies as weights, which are 2.5 grams or .088oz per penny, or about 11 cents per oz. But I believe using pennies in this manner is illegal, as it is illegal to destroy US money.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Tim O'Connor
 

Doug Harding wrote

... people just use pennies as weights, which are 2.5 grams or .088oz per penny,
or about 11 cents per oz. But I believe using pennies in this manner is illegal


I don't know why it would be, especially since you're not actually destroying
the pennies. And there have been articles published on using pennies (especially
handy when you need low profile weight) and no one's been prosecuted. Yet. :-)

Tim O'Connor


Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

(My) common sources for car weights:  salvage from ubiquitous medical facilities that have had lead-lined rooms for x-rays;  printing type (the best source because they are already perfectly sized);  lead flashing-  easy (easy!) to use and commonly available without having to melt, etc.; and mounds of foreign currency that are either impractical or impossible to exchange, e.g. Franks, Baht, Rubles, more Franks, Pesos, Francs, and Crowns (various).  I have not yet had to use car weights because of the ease of using the foregoing, but....I am prepared to do so!

Denny
 
Denny S. Anspach
Sacramento, CA


Andy Harman
 

I went searching for lead flashing in the Cincinnati area and came up empty.  Apparently it's just not used in roofing around here the way it is out west.  I wound up ordering a 3x6' lead sheet from McMaster-Carr in Cleveland about 8 years ago.  I've probably used half of it.  It is the easiest to work with, better than shot, tire weights or anything else.  Used it in freight, passenger, locos etc.  I also have some Cerrobend on hand which comes in handy on some applications... Like steam loco boilers.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Dec 31, 2013, at 10:12 AM, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:

(My) common sources for car weights:  salvage from ubiquitous medical facilities that have had lead-lined rooms for x-rays;  printing type (the best source because they are already perfectly sized);  lead flashing-  easy (easy!) to use and commonly available without having to melt, etc.; and mounds of foreign currency that are either impractical or impossible to exchange, e.g. Franks, Baht, Rubles, more Franks, Pesos, Francs, and Crowns (various).  I have not yet had to use car weights because of the ease of using the foregoing, but....I am prepared to do so!

Denny
 
Denny S. Anspach
Sacramento, CA


Tony Thompson
 

Andy Harman wrote:

 
I went searching for lead flashing in the Cincinnati area and came up empty.  Apparently it's just not used in roofing around here the way it is out west.  I wound up ordering a 3x6' lead sheet from McMaster-Carr in Cleveland about 8 years ago.  I've probably used half of it.  It is the easiest to work with, better than shot, tire weights or anything else.  Used it in freight, passenger, locos etc.  I also have some Cerrobend on hand which comes in handy on some applications... Like steam loco boilers.

  I agree with Andy, lead sheet is far easier to work with than wheel weights. I bought my sheet of lead at a plumbing supply place, so if you strike with roofing supplies, you can try plumbers. My sheet, like Andy's, is probably only half used -- definitely a lifetime supply.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Tom in Texas
 

I have purchased lead chimney "jacks" in the roofing departments of Lowes or Home Depot

Tom in Texas


Andy Harman
 

Grossly overpriced for the amount of material you get. I went to an 84 lumber and asked about lead flashing and the kid said "you mean metal?" and I said yes lead is a metal. He showed me a bunch of galvanized stuff.

The only lead I found were those chimney jacks.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 1, 2014, at 4:27 PM, Tom <texpearson@...> wrote:

I have purchased lead chimney "jacks" in the roofing departments of Lowes or Home Depot

Tom in Texas

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Andy Sperandeo
 

Like Tony and Andy, I prefer lead sheet to tire weights. I've had tire weights come unstuck inside cars, but I use screws to secure the lead sheet, and they stay put.

Happy New Year,

Andy


Andy Harman
 

At 02:47 PM 1/1/2014 -0800, you wrote:
Like Tony and Andy, I prefer lead sheet to tire weights. I've had tire weights come unstuck inside cars, but I use screws to secure the lead sheet, and they stay put.
I usually cyanopoxy the lead in place. Sometimes I fold it over and stack it up, in that case I put some cyanopoxy between the layers and then squeeze it in a vice. For freight cars, if I'm not using the factory weight, I will just slip some sheet lead anyplace I can hide it.

Cerrobend is good for things like filling the hollow sill of a flat car for a low center of gravity. Its melting point is well below that of styrene IF you don't get it too hot, you can pour it right in. It's a bismuth alloy that is heavier than lead. Very expensive, but very handy to get some density in very tight spots. My dad used it on some wood kits back in the 50s.

Andy


Andy Harman
 

At 01:26 PM 1/1/2014 -0800, you wrote:
I agree with Andy, lead sheet is far easier to work with than wheel weights. I bought my sheet of lead at a plumbing supply place, so if you strike with roofing supplies, you can try plumbers. My sheet, like Andy's, is probably only half used -- definitely a lifetime supply.


Many of my customers in the 80s up through the mid 90s were in the printing business and they still used lead type here and there. I have about 75 lbs of slugs with names of long out-of-business banks and businesses on them. Some are aluminum - not really usable - but most are lead/zinc alloy type and are at least flat. I used these for a long time back in the days when I tended to overweight my freight cars. But they're rather thick - 1/8" or more, and not being pure lead they tend to break rather than bend, or crumble if you try to pound them flat. Genuine pure lead sheet is much more malleable and you can cut it with scissors, fold it, etc. I probably won't use the slugs at all anymore.

One customer had 2-foot longs of blank leading... they printed election forms and other government stuff. They gave me a nice bundle of those strips way back in the mid 1980s. Much thinner, and smooth - used them up on all of the passenger cars I kitbashed back then. But the lead sheet is even better.

Andy