Cudahy Meat Reefer End Color Question


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

While we’re talking about meat reefers, that Tru Color paint shade best matches the red ends, fascia, and door kick plates on Cudahy 5701-5850 meat reefers. I have Gene Greens color reefer book, and the red is very red on newly painted cars, and faded red on old paint jobs. I also have the Tru Color color swatches in pdf format, but it’s hard to get a match between a color monitor and a book photograph. There’s no Tru Color dealer near Iowa City that I’m aware of, so I can’t easily try to match from a bottle. Sunshine 24.17 is read to paint. Since I ordered two and got one, we can safely assume that there are no more.

 

Nelson Moyer

 


Tony Thompson
 

Nelson Moyer wrote:

I also have the Tru Color color swatches in pdf format, but it’s hard to get a match between a color monitor and a book photograph. 

   Not true. In Photoshop you can sample the color and get either an RGB or CMYK proportion; you can do the same with a scan from the book. Whether you want to trust the comparison is another matter. The original photo lighting, and the various modifications which may have happened to the file en route from scanner to printed page, are unknowable at this point but can certainly alter the hue and tone of the image.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Tim O'Connor
 


Which brings to mind a question --

Do scanners all use the same color (e.g. full frequency spectrum) light?

The color question will never be settled, because of course, color only
exists in our heads. (Our brain assigns "hues" to various electromagnetic
wavelengths based on hard-wired genetic programming, which can vary from
one set of genes to another.) But in that context, RGB readings are more
consistent than eyeballs.

:-)


Nelson Moyer wrote:

I also have the Tru Color color swatches in pdf format, but it�s hard to get a match between a color monitor and a book photograph.

   Not true. In Photoshop you can sample the color and get either an RGB or CMYK proportion; you can do the same with a scan from the book. Whether you want to trust the comparison is another matter. The original photo lighting, and the various modifications which may have happened to the file en route from scanner to printed page, are unknowable at this point but can certainly alter the hue and tone of the image.

Tony Thompson


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Tony, et. al.

 

I had already scanned the four color pictures available, so I opened the best one in Photoshop Elements along with all four Tru Color color chip files (they scanned them in four files with one quarter of the chart in each file). It would have been easier to get direct comparisons if the color chart was in one file, but after several sampling attempts, I gave up on a direct comparison and did an eyeball color match to the fascia, recorded the RBG numbers for the eyeball and eyedropper sample, then looked at the likely Tru Color candidates for similar RBG numbers. The eyedropper samples vary within a solid color chip depending upon where on the chip you sample, so I use the averaging method to arrive at the RBG number. That narrowed the field to D&RGW Orange, Guilford Orange, and Milwaukee Road Orange. That was a surprise, because my eye sees more red than orange in the photo. I was able to get a perfect match with the eyedropper sample and the eyeball match with all three colors by moving the cursor around a little in the color gradient, which indicates that any of these colors could be mixed to a perfect photo match by either the sample or eyeball method. Comparing the RBG numbers, Guilford Orange is the best eyedropper sample match, while Milwaukee Orange is the best eyeball match. My inclination is to go with the eyeball match, since it has the most red of the three colors. I’ll order both colors and see which one I like best.

 

I hadn’t done anything like this until now, so thank you Tony for spurring me to try something new.

 

As Tony points out, there are a lot of variables in color matching, and ultimately the appearance of the car under layout lighting will be the final measure of success.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2014 3:36 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Cudahy Meat Reefer End Color Question

 

 

Nelson Moyer wrote:

 

I also have the Tru Color color swatches in pdf format, but it’s hard to get a match between a color monitor and a book photograph. 

 

   Not true. In Photoshop you can sample the color and get either an RGB or CMYK proportion; you can do the same with a scan from the book. Whether you want to trust the comparison is another matter. The original photo lighting, and the various modifications which may have happened to the file en route from scanner to printed page, are unknowable at this point but can certainly alter the hue and tone of the image.

 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history

 


Dave Nelson
 

IMO the real problem is not the scanner or the photograph but the monitor in use (and laptop screens are far, far worse).  Waaaaaay too few people calibrate their monitor and so the scan may be perfect, the photo may be perfect but the screen throws in too much blue or too little green or too little brightness, etc. etc and/or any and all combinations of whatever can go wrong… is usually present on most screens.

 

I have a high end $600 screen and I calibrate it regularly because most of my work product for RR sims now is artwork.  I’m often SHOCKED at how f’ed up some of my peers artwork is on account of the lousy screen they use.

 

And please understand that the RGB values sent to my screen and to yours are identical for the same image – it’s the same digital data – but what each screen does with that data is often very, very different.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, January 22, 2014 2:08 PM


Which brings to mind a question --

Do scanners all use the same color (e.g. full frequency spectrum) light?

 


Tony Thompson
 

Dave Nelson wrote:

IMO the real problem is not the scanner or the photograph but the monitor in use (and laptop screens are far, far worse).  Waaaaaay too few people calibrate their monitor and so the scan may be perfect, the photo may be perfect but the screen throws in too much blue or too little green or too little brightness, etc. etc and/or any and all combinations of whatever can go wrong… is usually present on most screens.

    Quite true, Dave, but my suggestion was to use the RGB or CMYK proportions sampled from compared images, NOT to trust what you see on the screen.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history