Working with dry transfer decals.


Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

I am about to apply  relatively large HO multicolor dry transfer heralds onto the sides of a restored filled-and-finished Ambroid/Northeastern wood-sheathed express reefer.  I have a lot of experience working with and successfully decaling wood models, but no experience at all in applying dry transfers in the same circumstance.  With standard water slide decals, I work with them with various decal setting solutions to get them settled into wood siding seams, ending with slicing the decal at each seam before the final application of solution (usually Walthers).   

A big question:  can decal setting solution be used on dry transfers to get them to settle into seams? 

Denny
  
Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento, CA 

Please note my new eMail address.






Tim O'Connor
 

I wouldn't count on that Denny. I would transfer them to decal paper first,
and overcoat them with liquid decal film.

I am about to apply relatively large HO multicolor dry transfer heralds onto the sides of a restored filled-and-finished Ambroid/Northeastern wood-sheathed express reefer. I have a lot of experience working with and successfully decaling wood models, but no experience at all in applying dry transfers in the same circumstance. With standard water slide decals, I work with them with various decal setting solutions to get them settled into wood siding seams, ending with slicing the decal at each seam before the final application of solution (usually Walthers).

A big question: can decal setting solution be used on dry transfers to get them to settle into seams?

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento, CA


Douglas Harding
 

Denny in one word “NO”. They are called Dry transfers for a reason, they are not decals. You lay them on a dry surface and adhere them by rubbing them with a stylus or blunt pencil. They stick best to a rough surface, ie a flat paint. Just the opposite of water slide decals. No need to apply a gloss coat prior to lettering.

 

The transfers will come on a carrier sheet. Some are already laid out for proper spacing/alignment on the car side. Position the lettering so it is in the correct spot and tape one edge of the carrier sheet in place so it will not slip or move. Use the tape as a hinge so you can periodically check your work. Once positioned correctly (you only get one chance with Dry Transfers) take a stylus, blunt pencil, or similar and rub the carrier sheet over the transfer. Rubbing will generate heat which will fix the lettering to the car side. It does not require a lot of pressure, but you do want a uniform pressure over the entire transfer. You can tell when the lettering is adhered to the car side as the color will change under the carrier sheet and you can lift the sheet without lifting up the lettering. If some of the letter comes up, put the carrier sheet back down and run that area again (reason for the hinge).

 

Once all the lettering is place, then you can apply a flat finish to fix it in place.

 

If you have not used try transfers before I suggest you practice. Get a sheet of the Woodland Scenics alphabet lettering, and practice spelling out words on a piece of scrap. You will quickly learn how much pressure to apply (too much will tear the carrier sheet) and how to properly position and align the transfer prior to rubbing it.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Thomas Baker
 

This is an interesting point: I never thought of transferring the dry transfer to decal paper, coating that with Dullcote or some such product, and then effecting the transfer. I have never been successful with dry transfers. Thank you for the tip that will be useful since I have a number of dry transfers that could be used with this method.

Tom Baker

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Jack Burgess
 

Denny...

 

Doug provided a very good overview of using dry transfers, including the idea of practicing using them before applying them to a freight car. I used a lot of dry transfers back in my manual (ink and linen) drafting days and we used a nylon burnisher to rub the sheet to transfer the lettering. It works much better than a pencil or stylus since the tip is quite blunt. The other end was wide and square which worked well when dealing with large transfers since you could go over the entire sheet with that end of the tool and get the backing to initially stick to the surface before switching to the other tip to start actually transferring the lettering. Burnishers are still available and cheap...

 

Jack Burgess

 




william darnaby
 

Hi Denny,



I would also recommend putting them down on clear decal paper and then
applying them to the car with the usual methods. I first ran across this
technique some 20 years ago on a resin kit, maybe an early Sunshine, that
included dry transfers and clear decal film for this purpose. It worked
very well and avoided the tedium of getting the dry transfers down around
details like ribs and car siding.



Bill Darnaby



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Denny Anspach
Sent: Monday, March 03, 2014 10:18 PM
To: STMFC List
Subject: [STMFC] Working with dry transfer decals.





I am about to apply relatively large HO multicolor dry transfer heralds
onto the sides of a restored filled-and-finished Ambroid/Northeastern
wood-sheathed express reefer. I have a lot of experience working with and
successfully decaling wood models, but no experience at all in applying dry
transfers in the same circumstance. With standard water slide decals, I
work with them with various decal setting solutions to get them settled into
wood siding seams, ending with slicing the decal at each seam before the
final application of solution (usually Walthers).



A big question: can decal setting solution be used on dry transfers to get
them to settle into seams?



Denny



Denny S. Anspach MD

Sacramento, CA



Please note my new eMail address.




















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Norman+Laraine Larkin
 

As an aside, dry transfers work well as paint masks. Paint the surface your color of choice, apply the transfer (usually lettering), paint the exposed surface a second color, and once the last coat is dry, apply a piece of masking tape to the transfer, and carefully peel the tape off with the mask. The result is a clean and sharp image in your preferred color. Worked really well with Floquil.
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Baker" <bakert@andrews.edu>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 9:51 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Working with dry transfer decals.


This is an interesting point: I never thought of transferring the dry
transfer to decal paper, coating that with Dullcote or some such
product, and then effecting the transfer. I have never been successful
with dry transfers. Thank you for the tip that will be useful since I
have a number of dry transfers that could be used with this method.

Tom Baker

---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com



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ronald parisi
 

Denny:

I only use Dry transfers (INT's) and do 'settle' them down with decal setting solutions.
Then I use Dullcote sprayed over them for permanence and to take weathering chalks better. 
A note on wood models - I do a large area (usually to edges as I noticed that if I only did the area around the INT it had a different 'texture' and showed - that was with the flat paints I use.
I promised and haven't delivered to explain how I hold the INT down with Scotch frosted tape.
With that method the INT doesn't move especially important for multi color circumstances.

Ron Parisi
 


On Mon, Mar 3, 2014 at 11:17 PM, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:
 

I am about to apply  relatively large HO multicolor dry transfer heralds onto the sides of a restored filled-and-finished Ambroid/Northeastern wood-sheathed express reefer.  I have a lot of experience working with and successfully decaling wood models, but no experience at all in applying dry transfers in the same circumstance.  With standard water slide decals, I work with them with various decal setting solutions to get them settled into wood siding seams, ending with slicing the decal at each seam before the final application of solution (usually Walthers).   


A big question:  can decal setting solution be used on dry transfers to get them to settle into seams? 

Denny
  
Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento, CA 

Please note my new eMail address.







Tim O'Connor
 

Doug

I agree with all of this, except that I'd also agree with another post,
that a small piece of 3M magic tape will hold the transfer in place. Also
I ALWAYS transfer the tiny dry transfer lettering (anything smaller than
3" letters) to decal paper now. The tiny letters are very fragile and can
be tricky to get them directly onto a model.

Tim O'

The transfers will come on a carrier sheet. Some are already laid out for proper spacing/alignment on the car side. Position the lettering so it is in the correct spot and tape one edge of the carrier sheet in place so it will not slip or move. Use the tape as a hinge so you can periodically check your work. Once positioned correctly (you only get one chance with Dry Transfers) take a stylus, blunt pencil, or similar and rub the carrier sheet over the transfer.
Doug Harding


Rod Miller
 

On 3/4/14, 9:06 AM, Norman+Laraine Larkin wrote:
As an aside, dry transfers work well as paint masks. Paint the surface your
color of choice, apply the transfer (usually lettering), paint the exposed
surface a second color, and once the last coat is dry, apply a piece of
masking tape to the transfer, and carefully peel the tape off with the mask.
The result is a clean and sharp image in your preferred color. Worked really
well with Floquil.
Norm Larkin
Great tip.

Here's something I learned when applying an NP monad herald.
The monad is 3 colors, white, black, and red so you have to
put the 2nd and 3rd colors down on top of others. Burnish
only where the new color will go, and if you have to burnish
over an existing color, try to stay on the new color. Otherwise
the existing color can get attached to the dry transfer
backing and will be lifted when you pick up the backing.

Rod
--

Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2015 Meet is Feb 5 - 7
http://www.rodmiller.com | http://www.oscalewest.com


michaelegross <michaelEGross@...>
 

Very thorough and helpful description of their application, Doug.  I have used Clover House dry transfers for years, particularly their chalk marks, and find them wonderful.

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA


Anspach Denny <danspachmd@...>
 

Thank all of you who promptly replied with good suggestions on this subject, both on list and off.  

I took the suggestion offered on list by notable veterans Tim O'C, Bill Darnaby and distinguished others,  and successfully laid out the large dry transfers (ancient Letraset) on to decal film (Microscale). I did so keeping the art and tricks espoused by the good Rev. Doug Harding well in mind. 

 There certainly is a learning curve and (as always) the tool that I needed RIGHT NOW, my (rarely-used) burnisher, was no where to be found in the milieu of my otherwise well ordered bench. A #2 pencil had to do. It worked! When I at last   removed the masks, all the print had successfully transferred onto the decal film. 

Not trusting the adhesion, I gave the new decals a quick covering of Glosscote. When dry, I soaked them in water for about 20 secs. max, and after a quick application of Microscale red Micro Sol on the wood siding,  the decals transferred smoothly intact into place, where they immediately began to settle down very nicely over the surface contours and into the seams. I did some (too) early cutting through into the seams (no real damage), and I anticipate that this eventually will also  go well, giving the desired appearance of some age in the process.

At another time, I might use a more robust decal film than Microscale inasmuch as the ultra thin-ness of the film and size of the decal (a very large herald) made it very difficult to position safely. 


Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento