Scientific nomenclature


Clark Propst
 

Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle have a real railroad engineering type name?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Andy Miller
 

Clark,



I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common
on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".



Regards,



Andy Miller



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
cepropst@q.com
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 10:07 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature





Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle
have a real railroad engineering type name?

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Michael Watnoski
 

The sheet metal type is a 'Carmer cut lever'. I believe the technical term is 'pin lifter'.

Michael

On 5/4/2014 11:35 AM, Andrew Miller wrote:
Clark,


I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common
on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".


Regards,


Andy Miller


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
cepropst@q.com
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 10:07 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature



Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle
have a real railroad engineering type name?

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa








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Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

"Uncoupling lever" is official per CBD. "Cut lever" appears to be colloquial, but probably widely used.
 
Eric N.
 

----- Original Message -----
To: STMFC
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 10:07 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature

 

Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle have a real railroad engineering type name?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


destorzek@...
 

In the 1922 CBC, all other alternate terms re-direct to this:

"Uncoupling Lever or Uncoupling Rod. An iron rod with a bent handle forming a lever, usually attached to the end sill, by which the lock of the automatic coupler is opened and the cars uncoupled without going between them. The lever proper is the part attached to the rod and operating the unlocking mechanism, but in the case of freight cars the lever and rod are generally made in one piece. In passenger equipment cars the lever is located on the platform or in the vestibule. The short lever which is directly connected to a passenger coupler is also sometimes called an uncoupling lever. Figs. 1237, 1325-1339."

The listing was unchanged in the 1946 CBC, except for eliminating the reference to specific figures.

Dennis Storzek


Richard Hendrickson
 


On May 4, 2014, at 8:50 AM, destorzek@... wrote:

In the 1922 CBC, all other alternate terms re-direct to this:

"Uncoupling Lever or Uncoupling Rod. An iron rod with a bent handle forming a lever, usually attached to the end sill, by which the lock of the automatic coupler is opened and the cars uncoupled without going between them. The lever proper is the part attached to the rod and operating the unlocking mechanism, but in the case of freight cars the lever and rod are generally made in one piece. In passenger equipment cars the lever is located on the platform or in the vestibule. The short lever which is directly connected to a passenger coupler is also sometimes called an uncoupling lever. Figs. 1237, 1325-1339."

The listing was unchanged in the 1946 CBC, except for eliminating the reference to specific figures.

I will add to this that (also in the 1946 CBCyc) the Standard Railway Equipment Co. described its uncoupling mechanisms, both top and bottom operated, as “coupler release rigging” and the bottom operated type as “rotary coupler release rigging.”  By 1953, Standard had developed a version of the rotary bottom-operated uncoupling rod which it described as a "coupler device,” though the official AAR terminology continued to be “uncoupling rod.”  Later, with the development of long-travel cushion underframes, the increased rage of motion between draft gear and car body required some sort of sliding or articulated arrangement of uncoupling rod, and it then became common to call that arrangement an “uncoupling mechanism,” though that was just beginning to appear ca. 1960.

In any case, Eric Neubauer is right that “cut lever” was colloquial usage, and though common among railroad operating department and car shop crews, it was not used in railway engineering practice. 

Finally, while we’re on the subject of terminology, some model railroaders are in the habit of referring to the Standard Railway Equipment Co. as “Stanray,” and that is incorrect in the steam era.  Stanray was a corporation that evolved out of the Standard Railway Equipment Co., but not until well after the period covered by the STMFC list. 

Richard Hendrickson



Schuyler Larrabee
 

Andy, those are “Carmer” levers, not ‘carmen’ levers.  Carmer was a specific design and a particular manufacturer.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Andrew Miller
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 11:36 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature

 

 

Clark,

I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common
on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".

Regards,

Andy Miller

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
cepropst@q.com
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 10:07 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature

Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle
have a real railroad engineering type name?

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Tony Thompson
 

Andrew Miller wrote:

I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".


      That would be "Carmer," name of the maker of a specific product.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
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Andy Sperandeo
 

Hi Clark,

Formally (as in Cyclopedias) it's the "uncoupling lever," but many railroaders call it the "cut lever" for what it does. "Coupler lift bar" is a model railroad term as far as I can tell.

So long,

Andy


Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

I'd guess coupler (or pin) lift bar would apply only when the lever went to the top of the coupler.
 
Eric N.
 

 

Hi Clark,

Formally (as in Cyclopedias) it's the "uncoupling lever," but many railroaders call it the "cut lever" for what it does. "Coupler lift bar" is a model railroad term as far as I can tell.

So long,

Andy


Tim O'Connor
 


That's correct. Carmen cut levers were exceptionally high spirited and flirtatious.


Andy, those are �Carmer� levers, not �carmen� levers.  Carmer was a specific design and a particular manufacturer.
 
Schuyler
 
From: STMFC@... [ mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Andrew Miller

Clark,

I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common
on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".

Regards,

Andy Miller


albyrno
 

Clark,
 Look in one of the car builders cyclopedias. These will literally tell you what kitchen sink was used in passenger cars,among other appliances and hardware.There are diagrams of coupler components listed in these.
   Alan


Geodyssey
 

Eric,


The coupler pin is raised up no matter how the bar/rod is connected, top or bottom.  So "coupler lift bar" is ok (well, by me).  Also, there really isn't a single "official" name for the device, let alone a "scientific" name.  There are just accepted names.


Robert Simpson

ex-pin puller, switch thrower and friction bearing dealer-wither.





---In STMFC@..., <eaneubauer@...> wrote :

I'd guess coupler (or pin) lift bar would apply only when the lever went to the top of the coupler.
 
Eric N.
 

 
Hi Clark,

Formally (as in Cyclopedias) it's the "uncoupling lever," but many railroaders call it the "cut lever" for what it does. "Coupler lift bar" is a model railroad term as far as I can tell.

So long,

Andy