terra cotta roofing tiles


ed_mines
 

 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines


William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Hi Ed and Group,

A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines




O Fenton Wells
 

Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.
From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi Ed and Group,


A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines






--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Fenton and Group,

I suspect that the cast iron pipe and concrete pipe were produced in major population areas and that terra cotta roof tiles and pipe were more of a local production product. 

How local? One of the projects that I worked on some years back was the restoration of a vaudeville theater in Newport Beach, California. The building was constructed around 1927-1928. The building had a clay tile roof and we soon discovered that the clay tiles were hand made. Actually hand formed over the leg of fellow doing the manufacture. These roof tiles may have been made right on the construction site. The existing roof tiles still showed the finger prints of the person doing the forming. Life — and construction methods — were a lot different that what we see today almost 85 years on.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA



On May 26, 2014, at 11:27 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.
From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi Ed and Group,


A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines







-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...



O Fenton Wells
 

I think you are correct I know in the south east clay building products were very local.  Tile, pipe and brick plants, albeit it very small were in almost every town.    I know early on bricks were made at the construction site.
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 3:11 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Fenton and Group,


I suspect that the cast iron pipe and concrete pipe were produced in major population areas and that terra cotta roof tiles and pipe were more of a local production product. 

How local? One of the projects that I worked on some years back was the restoration of a vaudeville theater in Newport Beach, California. The building was constructed around 1927-1928. The building had a clay tile roof and we soon discovered that the clay tiles were hand made. Actually hand formed over the leg of fellow doing the manufacture. These roof tiles may have been made right on the construction site. The existing roof tiles still showed the finger prints of the person doing the forming. Life — and construction methods — were a lot different that what we see today almost 85 years on.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA



On May 26, 2014, at 11:27 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.
From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi Ed and Group,


A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines







-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...





--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Winfield, IA was once home to the Merillat Road Construction Co., a large producer of culverts of various types that distributed throughout Iowa and probably in Western Illinois and Northeastern Missouri. L. B. Pierce Brick and Tile Factory and E. C. Smith Sash and Door Factory were also located there. Winfield was and still is a small town in East Central Iowa. It was served by the CB&Q and the M&StL, so rail shipments are probable, given the state of rural roads in the 1920-30s. I have photos of all of these industries, but I don’t know who, if anyone, retains the rights, so I can’t post them to the photo section at this time. That’s a shame, because they’re too good not to be distributed to a group that would fully appreciate them. I photographed the photographs and copies of photographs at the Winfield Historical Society a couple of years ago. I’ll inquire about posting them.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent:
Monday, May 26, 2014 2:20 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] terra cotta roofing tiles

 

 

I think you are correct I know in the south east clay building products were very local.  Tile, pipe and brick plants, albeit it very small were in almost every town.    I know early on bricks were made at the construction site.

Fenton Wells

 

On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 3:11 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Fenton and Group,

 

I suspect that the cast iron pipe and concrete pipe were produced in major population areas and that terra cotta roof tiles and pipe were more of a local production product. 

 

How local? One of the projects that I worked on some years back was the restoration of a vaudeville theater in Newport Beach, California. The building was constructed around 1927-1928. The building had a clay tile roof and we soon discovered that the clay tiles were hand made. Actually hand formed over the leg of fellow doing the manufacture. These roof tiles may have been made right on the construction site. The existing roof tiles still showed the finger prints of the person doing the forming. Life — and construction methods — were a lot different that what we see today almost 85 years on.

 

Cheers,

Bill Keene

Irvine, CA

 

 

 

On May 26, 2014, at 11:27 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



 

Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.

From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that

Fenton Wells

 

On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Hi Ed and Group,

 

A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

 

Cheers,

Bill Keene

Irvine, CA

 

 

On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



 

 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines

 

 

 



 

-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...

 

 



 

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...

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