Painting HO Scale Brass


Paul Hillman
 

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere "super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Schuyler Larrabee
 

How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect.



But, for me, once I'm sure there's no clearcoat on the model and I'm really
dealing with brass as my surface to paint . . .

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with
that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar
with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20
minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.



I prime it with Scalecoat 1, first, and bake it per the directions. Maybe
140-150 degrees for a half hour plus. This will give you a rock-hard glossy
surface. Then the finish coat, or coats as the case may be, and bake those
too.



For masking, I use Scotch 3M 218 Fine Line tape, cut to fit around any
protuberances. Cover any gaps in the taping with rubber cement, or
MicroScale's Micro-.Mask There's been a ton printed about how to remove the
tape, pulling it back so it's coming off the model at a 178 degree angle (as
near to 180 as you can manage) so you're minimizing the perpendicular pull
on the paint.



Decal.



Flat coat.*



Weather.



Done.





*There's been a bit of whining about the demise of Dullcoat. Not from me.
I say "Finally." I have for years used a flat photo lacquer, which is DEAD
flat. If you remember Kar-Line models, which came with paint approximating
the finish on your new car, photo flat lacquer would turn Kar-Line cars into
presentable, weatherable layout scenery in one coat. They were usually
Athearn Blue Box models, hence "scenery" models. I bought a gallon of
McDonald's Photo Flat Lacquer around 1985. Thinned to a ratio of about 5:1
thinner/lacquer, it sprays very nicely and really works far better than
Dullcoat. And I still have a LOT left.





Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:25 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass





I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting
around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the
best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's
always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of
parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere
"super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Paul Hillman
 

Schuyler, thanks for the response. Found it new & interesting about etching with vinegar & salt. What kind of vinegar? (Type of salt = sodium chloride / "table salt"?)
 
Sounds like this replaces having to sand-blast.
 
Thanks, Paul Hillman
 
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:48 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect.

But, for me, once I'm sure there's no clearcoat on the model and I'm really
dealing with brass as my surface to paint . . .

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with
that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar
with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20
minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.

I prime it with Scalecoat 1, first, and bake it per the directions. Maybe
140-150 degrees for a half hour plus. This will give you a rock-hard glossy
surface. Then the finish coat, or coats as the case may be, and bake those
too.

For masking, I use Scotch 3M 218 Fine Line tape, cut to fit around any
protuberances. Cover any gaps in the taping with rubber cement, or
MicroScale's Micro-.Mask There's been a ton printed about how to remove the
tape, pulling it back so it's coming off the model at a 178 degree angle (as
near to 180 as you can manage) so you're minimizing the perpendicular pull
on the paint.

Decal.

Flat coat.*

Weather.

Done.

*There's been a bit of whining about the demise of Dullcoat. Not from me.
I say "Finally." I have for years used a flat photo lacquer, which is DEAD
flat. If you remember Kar-Line models, which came with paint approximating
the finish on your new car, photo flat lacquer would turn Kar-Line cars into
presentable, weatherable layout scenery in one coat. They were usually
Athearn Blue Box models, hence "scenery" models. I bought a gallon of
McDonald's Photo Flat Lacquer around 1985. Thinned to a ratio of about 5:1
thinner/lacquer, it sprays very nicely and really works far better than
Dullcoat. And I still have a LOT left.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting
around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the
best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's
always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of
parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere
"super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Tony Thompson
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20 minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.

     I would urge that this step be done cautiously. If the brass is one of those with a tough, adherent "brass-color" lacquer on it, no harm done. If it is bare brass, I would be careful because this mild etch can preferentially attack solder, depending on the composition of solder used in the original fabrication. So watch carefully around any visible solder joints and if anything seems to be happening there, STOP and remove and rinse thoroughly.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Schuyler Larrabee
 

I may amuse (or exasperate) the chemists on the list, but IIRC, vinegar and salt make weak hydrochloric acid.  I don’t know as it >replaces< grit blasting, as that can reduce or eliminate some surface imperfections (solder buildup, epoxy smears, things like that, I think) but once the model is physically what you want it to be, it really does CLEAN the surface.

 

You might want to take into account that I do not own a grit blasting setup.  And since I don’t own one or have ready access to one . . .

 

I use distilled white vinegar (not derived from foods) and yup, plain ol’ Morton’s.  I keep it back in the glass bottle, appropriately marked and stored with my paint stuff, with some plastic wrap under that steel cap.  I probably should buy a new bottle with a plastic cap!  Same bottle’s done  . . . I dunno, 15-18 models?  A lot.  Lasts quite a while.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

Schuyler, thanks for the response. Found it new & interesting about etching with vinegar & salt. What kind of vinegar? (Type of salt = sodium chloride / "table salt"?)

 

Sounds like this replaces having to sand-blast.

 

Thanks, Paul Hillman

 

 

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:48 PM

Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect.

But, for me, once I'm sure there's no clearcoat on the model and I'm really
dealing with brass as my surface to paint . . .

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with
that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar
with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20
minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.

I prime it with Scalecoat 1, first, and bake it per the directions. Maybe
140-150 degrees for a half hour plus. This will give you a rock-hard glossy
surface. Then the finish coat, or coats as the case may be, and bake those
too.

For masking, I use Scotch 3M 218 Fine Line tape, cut to fit around any
protuberances. Cover any gaps in the taping with rubber cement, or
MicroScale's Micro-.Mask There's been a ton printed about how to remove the
tape, pulling it back so it's coming off the model at a 178 degree angle (as
near to 180 as you can manage) so you're minimizing the perpendicular pull
on the paint.

Decal.

Flat coat.*

Weather.

Done.

*There's been a bit of whining about the demise of Dullcoat. Not from me.
I say "Finally." I have for years used a flat photo lacquer, which is DEAD
flat. If you remember Kar-Line models, which came with paint approximating
the finish on your new car, photo flat lacquer would turn Kar-Line cars into
presentable, weatherable layout scenery in one coat. They were usually
Athearn Blue Box models, hence "scenery" models. I bought a gallon of
McDonald's Photo Flat Lacquer around 1985. Thinned to a ratio of about 5:1
thinner/lacquer, it sprays very nicely and really works far better than
Dullcoat. And I still have a LOT left.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting
around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the
best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's
always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of
parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere
"super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Bruce Smith
 

Paul,

Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1.  I don't bake - there is no need and too much risk for my taste. 

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 5:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass



I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere "super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman




Paul Hillman
 

Googled the following for all list chemists:
 
 Vinegar consists of acetic acid (CH3COOH), water and trace amounts of other chemicals, which may include flavorings. The concentration of the acetic acid is variable. Distilled vinegar contains 5-8% acetic acid. Spirit of vinegar is a stronger form of vinegar that contains 5-20% acetic acid.
 
"Table salt - ( 'Morton's Salt' ) " = sodium chloride = NaCl
 
Hydrochloric acid = HCl
 
So,.........mixing NaCl + CH3COOH = HCl ( ? )
 
Paul Hillman
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 8:42 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

I may amuse (or exasperate) the chemists on the list, but IIRC, vinegar and salt make weak hydrochloric acid.  I don't know as it >replaces< grit blasting, as that can reduce or eliminate some surface imperfections (solder buildup, epoxy smears, things like that, I think) but once the model is physically what you want it to be, it really does CLEAN the surface.

You might want to take into account that I do not own a grit blasting setup.  And since I don't own one or have ready access to one . . .

I use distilled white vinegar (not derived from foods) and yup, plain ol' Morton's.  I keep it back in the glass bottle, appropriately marked and stored with my paint stuff, with some plastic wrap under that steel cap.  I probably should buy a new bottle with a plastic cap!  Same bottle's done  . . . I dunno, 15-18 models?  A lot.  Lasts quite a while.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

Schuyler, thanks for the response. Found it new & interesting about etching with vinegar & salt. What kind of vinegar? (Type of salt = sodium chloride / "table salt"?)

Sounds like this replaces having to sand-blast.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----

To: STMFC@...

Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:48 PM

Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect.

But, for me, once I'm sure there's no clearcoat on the model and I'm really
dealing with brass as my surface to paint . . .

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with
that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar
with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20
minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.

I prime it with Scalecoat 1, first, and bake it per the directions. Maybe
140-150 degrees for a half hour plus. This will give you a rock-hard glossy
surface. Then the finish coat, or coats as the case may be, and bake those
too.

For masking, I use Scotch 3M 218 Fine Line tape, cut to fit around any
protuberances. Cover any gaps in the taping with rubber cement, or
MicroScale's Micro-.Mask There's been a ton printed about how to remove the
tape, pulling it back so it's coming off the model at a 178 degree angle (as
near to 180 as you can manage) so you're minimizing the perpendicular pull
on the paint.

Decal.

Flat coat.*

Weather.

Done.

*There's been a bit of whining about the demise of Dullcoat. Not from me.
I say "Finally." I have for years used a flat photo lacquer, which is DEAD
flat. If you remember Kar-Line models, which came with paint approximating
the finish on your new car, photo flat lacquer would turn Kar-Line cars into
presentable, weatherable layout scenery in one coat. They were usually
Athearn Blue Box models, hence "scenery" models. I bought a gallon of
McDonald's Photo Flat Lacquer around 1985. Thinned to a ratio of about 5:1
thinner/lacquer, it sprays very nicely and really works far better than
Dullcoat. And I still have a LOT left.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting
around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the
best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's
always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of
parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere
"super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Baking at 150-160 degrees . . . that can easily be the temperature of your models in the trunk or especially in the back seat of your car.  So unless you have a fully temperature-controlled environment at all times and don’t take your model anywhere . . .

 

But knowing where you live, Bruce, you MAY have a temperature-controlled environment.  At least, I >hope< you have  AC!

 

Baking is what sets Scalecoat I hard, nearly impossible to scratch.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 10:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

Paul,

 

Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1.  I don't bake - there is no need and too much risk for my taste. 

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 5:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere "super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

 


Mikebrock
 

Schuyler Larrabee writes:

"How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect."

Pretty close I'd say. And, to add to the list:

After following Schuyler's cleaning technique, I place a brass shell [ car or locomitive ] into a solution of photo tray cleaner [ using a rectangular glass baking dish. For about 10 seconds. Then, into a pail of water it goes. Really cleans any corrosion. After a few minutes in the water I make absolutely certain every thing is dry [ using a hair dryer blower ] I paint. With [ now ] Polyscale. Baking? You're kidding. Why?

Unfortunately it's getting to be difficult to find tray cleaner solution.

Mike Brock


Bruce Smith
 

Schuyler,

That's why I never leave models in a parked car around here !  

The reality is that home oven controllers are notoriously inaccurate and especially in the lower ranges.  If you do bake, make sure all meltable parts are off the model and use an accurate thermometer to check the temperature of your oven, or use a specially built oven with an accurate thermostat in the desired range.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass



Baking at 150-160 degrees . . . that can easily be the temperature of your models in the trunk or especially in the back seat of your car.  So unless you have a fully temperature-controlled environment at all times and don’t take your model anywhere . . .

 

But knowing where you live, Bruce, you MAY have a temperature-controlled environment.  At least, I >hope< you have  AC!

 

Baking is what sets Scalecoat I hard, nearly impossible to scratch.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 10:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

Paul,

 

Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1.  I don't bake - there is no need and too much risk for my taste. 

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

!

 


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 5:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

I have a! n unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere "super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

 




Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

Recognizing that "primer" is in most instances just another gray (usually) paint, I continue to favor its use as an undercoat on brass. 

Its flatness makes it relatively easy to detect small surface defects not otherwise easy to see (or correct) prior to applying any finish coat. 

Despite the repeated mantra of Scalecoat I not requiring any undercoat, I haver repeatedly been disappointed that the paint minus undercoat does not stand up nearly as well to casual scratches or wear.  I do not know why this is so, unless the added thickness of the undercoat may provide a sort of cushion to withstand such physical assaults.

I do not know what has happened to the "old" primers that were actually supposed to bite into the metal surface.  Perhaps they never did, or the EPA did them in. I still have quart of DuPont gray automotive primer from the '60s that was/is supposed to be such a product.

Denny  


Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA






Schuyler Larrabee
 

that is, of course, quite good advice.

Schuyler

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Tablet

"'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@auburn.edu [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Schuyler,

That's why I never leave models in a parked car around here <G>!

The reality is that home oven controllers are notoriously inaccurate and especially in the lower ranges. If you do bake, make sure all meltable parts are off the model and use an accurate thermometer to check the temperature of your oven, or use a specially built oven with an accurate thermostat in the desired range.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:45 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass



Baking at 150-160 degrees . . . that can easily be the temperature of your models in the trunk or especially in the back seat of your car. So unless you have a fully temperature-controlled environment at all times and don’t take your model anywhere . . .

But knowing where you live, Bruce, you MAY have a temperature-controlled environment. At least, I >hope< you have AC!

Baking is what sets Scalecoat I hard, nearly impossible to scratch.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 10:02 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass


Paul,

Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1. I don't bake - there is no need and too much risk for my taste.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
!

________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com> [STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 5:25 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass


I have a! n unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.


Schuyler Larrabee
 

The other reason to apply primer is to make the model all a uniform color, which permits thinner final color coats since they don't have to cover everything from dark solder joints to bright brass. Especially true if you have a light color, yellow, for instance, or white. A yellow UP streamliner would really benefit from a gray primer/undercoat.

Schuyler

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE Tablet

"Denny Anspach danspachmd@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Recognizing that "primer" is in most instances just another gray (usually) paint, I continue to favor its use as an undercoat on brass. 


Its flatness makes it relatively easy to detect small surface defects not otherwise easy to see (or correct) prior to applying any finish coat. 

Despite the repeated mantra of Scalecoat I not requiring any undercoat, I haver repeatedly been disappointed that the paint minus undercoat does not stand up nearly as well to casual scratches or wear.  I do not know why this is so, unless the added thickness of the undercoat may provide a sort of cushion to withstand such physical assaults.

I do not know what has happened to the "old" primers that were actually supposed to bite into the metal surface.  Perhaps they never did, or the EPA did them in. I still have quart of DuPont gray automotive primer from the '60s that was/is supposed to be such a product.

Denny  


Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA






Greg Martin
 

Paul in Context:
 
 
Paul Hillman  writes:

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.
You didn't mention if it was showing signs of tarnish or not. Strip the applied varnish off the car with ACETONE, just soak it in a Tupperware container in the garage not in the house...  Then if you wish you can etch it, I never have to this day, but I do wash it in warm soapy water and dry it completely.


It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the best current methods?
You know the one about Old Dawgs and new tricks?


In the past I have baked on a primer, then sprayed the final colors. There's always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of parts.
I have only watched a brass (actually two Brass models) baked at low temperature and it was an ugly result and not my models... I don't bake mine in an oven. Paul I believe you live in Southern California???  What I do to "bake"on paint is to put the models on a piece of Masonite/hardboard and dry them under a clear plastic container like the one that the cookies come in or a long flat cake. I leave them in the sun and on a warm day they will bake up in a couple of hours. Remember when you lift the top the brass will still be warm/hot and the paint likely tacky so I move it into the garage from the patio or driveway and let it cool naturally. When it has cooled if it still has a tack, heat it up again... But this environment is much safer for brass than an oven. I will tell you that will works for plastic but in a much shorter time and with a watchful eye... very watchful  


I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere "super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman
 
My 2¢ worth
 
Greg Martin


Tony Thompson
 

Bruce  Smith wrote:

The reality is that home oven controllers are notoriously inaccurate and especially in the lower ranges.  If you do bake, make sure all meltable parts are off the model and use an accurate thermometer to check the temperature of your oven, or use a specially built oven with an accurate thermostat in the desired range.

     Amen! If you have a device that gives an accurate temperature reading, you will be astounded at what your oven thinks it is doing in the low range.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Tim O'Connor
 

I pre-heat the oven, and turn it off when I place the model inside.

You can just put a dish of water in the oven and if it starts to boil
you know the oven is way too hot! :-) (but remove the water before you
put the model inside)

I've only had problems with my ultrasonic cleaner -- it heats up the
model slowly but if you forget about it (I did once!) you might return
to find a pile of brass parts (as I did)

That's why I never leave models in a parked car around here <G>!

The reality is that home oven controllers are notoriously inaccurate and especially in the lower ranges. If you do bake, make sure all meltable parts are off the model and use an accurate thermometer to check the temperature of your oven, or use a specially built oven with an accurate thermostat in the desired range.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


riverman_vt@...
 

Hi Paul,

 

      Schuyler and I seem to have been painting brass about an equal number of years and use very similar methods. About the only difference I notice is that I bake the first coat of Scalecoat I for at least two hours and each succeeding coat for an hour. While I might use other paints for weathering colors. I have been using Scalecoat I exclusively on brass since the late 1960's and, based on the experience of several friends, have

never seen a reason to change, especially given my previous experience with another brand. My late associate Harry A. Frye adopted the habit of using Scalecoat II on brass as well as plastic and always felt he made out as well with the Scalecoat II on brass as I did with Scalecoat I but I do not think he prepared the surface in the same way. He may well have left the clear lacquer on.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


riverman_vt@...
 

      How much control do you have painting with a "spray bomb" compared to a good airbrush, Bruce?

Given the cost of any good brass model that did not come factory painted today I'm not about to get any closer to one with a "spray bomb" than with any type of H.E. bomb. Nor do I think you would have any problem baking a finish on brass as long as you used an electric oven with its much more precise controls and kept it at no more than 150 degrees. I once tried a gas oven for this, the operative word here being "once".even with an oven thermometer to constantly monitor the temperature I will never try it again as gas ovens have been found to be notoriously inaccurate when it comes to temperature settings. My one "try" with a gas oven was in 1972 and I still have a Tfains, Inc. expfress reefer in kit form from that effort as a reminder.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


Bruce Smith
 

Don,

The Model Master paint is spectacular and I get extremely nice results straight from the can.  I do enjoy showing models to folks and then saying it was painted with a spray can <VBG>.  The paint is amazingly self leveling and gives a beautiful coat.  I do all my PRR motive power with this now. About the only issue I have had is with the fine vents on some of my electric locos, but I have the same issues with airbrushing Scalecoat over them. For the parts that stay black, that's all I do.  For the DGLE, I top coat with DGLE and then weather.  An added benefit is that when I am done with spraying, I tip the can upside down, clear the nozzle and am already enjoying one of my nice homebrews, while y'all are still sucking fumes cleaning your airbrush .  If I could find PRR 1940s PRR Freight Car Color in a Model Master spray bomb, I could paint my freight cars the same was and be a very happy man. As it is, I use a mix of Scalecoat I to paint brass PRR freight and cabin cars.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


On May 28, 2014, at 3:51 AM, riverman_vt@... [STMFC] wrote:



      How much control do you have painting with a "spray bomb" compared to a good airbrush, Bruce?

Given the cost of any good brass model that did not come factory painted today I'm not about to get any closer to one with a "spray bomb" than with any type of H.E. bomb. Nor do I think you would have any problem baking a finish on brass as long as you used an electric oven with its much more precise controls and kept it at no more than 150 degrees. I once tried a gas oven for this, the operative word here being "once".even with an oven thermometer to constantly monitor the temperature I will never try it again as gas ovens have been found to be notoriously inaccurate when it comes to temperature settings. My one "try" with a gas oven was in 1972 and I still have a Tfains, Inc. expfress reefer in kit form from that effort as a reminder.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine





ed_mines
 

Anyone taking organic chemistry soon learns that adding A to B does not always result in C & D.

 

Chemists sometimes have to stand on their heads to get get a little bit of C -put in a whole lot of extra A and remove D as soon as it forms.

 

Many foods including ketchup contain both vinegar and salt.

 

Ed Mines