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more freight cars from the far past


Schuyler Larrabee
 

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-24-14/C4664.jpg

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-24-14/C4665.jpg

 

Bob Bahrs, one of the erielack experts (principally on the DL&W) provides these notes:

 

C4664 & C4665 Mr Bunnell has moved seven miles east to a little east of

Johnson City, NY at MP 193.   C4664  looks east and C4665 looks west.

This of course is still in the

area where the Erie and Lackawanna were right alongside each other.

 

The photo is on the Lackawanna tracks, and the train of freight cars adjacent is on the ERIE.  You freightcarologists will be kicking yourselves that you cannot walk along the line photographing each and every one of those cars.  Maybe in particular “Atlantic Coast Despatch” ACL 23215.  I know I am.

 

 

Schuyler


O Fenton Wells
 

Check out the ACL truss rod vent box in the second photo.

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Charles Peck
 

I love the saggy cars in both photos. There really IS a prototype for those
John Allen cars.
Chuck Peck


On Tue, Jun 24, 2014 at 3:29 PM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Check out the ACL truss rod vent box in the second photo.

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...



Riverboy
 

I like looking closely at old photos like these. In the first photo, the Illinois Central box car has a little bit of a sag in it, while the Southern car right behind it has a very slight arch to it. The rest of the cars appear to be straight.

Tod (Ohio)
 
 


On Tuesday, June 24, 2014 3:42 PM, "Charles Peck lnnrr152@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I love the saggy cars in both photos. There really IS a prototype for those
John Allen cars.
Chuck Peck


On Tue, Jun 24, 2014 at 3:29 PM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 
Check out the ACL truss rod vent box in the second photo.

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...




riverman_vt@...
 

    Of equal interest is the track in the second photo. Note the full use of tie plates but

rail held in place with BOLTS, not spikes!!!!

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


Dennis Storzek
 

Screw spikes, Don

Dennis


riverman_vt@...
 

Hi Dennis,

 

     Call them what you will, the y took me by surprise. I think of such things

as being largely European, much like what I see used in Russia or Ukraine

whenever Tanya and I go back to her home in Russia, which we have kept,

and what was seen last fall from Munich to Budapest, though rail clips seem

to be more common with concrete ties. Just how much use of these "screw

spikes" was made in North America? sort of reminds me of the Belfast &

Moosehead Lake in Maine which uses butt joints. That is joints side-by-side

in both rails rather than staggered.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


John Larkin
 

They were used in timber bridges in North America, especially in holding timbers together, not for clamping rail to the bridge.  Also, I haven't seen them, but I have been told by MofW people that they were used on tight curves, especially on the gauge side of the outer rail, to help keep the rail from turning over under load.  The only other use I've seen is in the live steam hobby where I see 7.5" gauge tracks all over the place with them because of problems with spikes holding!  Very few of those use tie plates, making the spikes loosen up far too quickly and without the advantage of the plates helping hold rails in gauge!

John Larkin


On Thursday, June 26, 2014 10:03 AM, "riverman_vt@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Hi Dennis,
 
     Call them what you will, the y took me by surprise. I think of such things
as being largely European, much like what I see used in Russia or Ukraine
whenever Tanya and I go back to her home in Russia, which we have kept,
and what was seen last fall from Munich to Budapest, though rail clips seem
to be more common with concrete ties. Just how much use of these "screw
spikes" was made in North America? sort of reminds me of the Belfast &
Moosehead Lake in Maine which uses butt joints. That is joints side-by-side
in both rails rather than staggered.
 
Cordially, Don Valentine