Richard Hendrickson


Mikebrock
 

The STMFC, RPM in general, Prototype Rails, certainly various historical and modeling organizations [ led, of course, by the Santa Fe ] and many other model railroading groups have lost a giant among their members. Many of us have lost a dear friend as well and his passing will be difficult to take.

I would just say that, among the several thousand STMFC members, I only referred to one by his first name alone...Richard. Everyone knew who I was referring to. Let me add that I can also say that, without Richard, there would not have been a Steam Era Freight Car Group.

Mike Brock


Richard Hendrickson
 

Dear Mike,
     I’ve gotten so many cudos to Richard …. it’s a shame he isn’t here to hear them.  Thank you for your kind words.  And please relay to STMFC my thanks.  This was so sudden and unexpected that I still don’t know what I’m doing.
     Sandra
On Jul 1, 2014, at 9:37 PM, 'Mike Brock' brockm@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

The STMFC, RPM in general, Prototype Rails, certainly various historical and 
modeling organizations [ led, of course, by the Santa Fe ] and many other 
model railroading groups have lost a giant among their members. Many of us 
have lost a dear friend as well and his passing will be difficult to take.

I would just say that, among the several thousand STMFC members, I only 
referred to one by his first name alone...Richard. Everyone knew who I was 
referring to. Let me add that I can also say that, without Richard, there 
would not have been a Steam Era Freight Car Group.

Mike Brock 


Sandra Hendrickson



Douglas Harding
 

With all the other positive comments about Richard, his personality, and his tremendous support of the hobby and especially his unbelievable knowledge about freight cars, I would like to add two comments of a personal nature. 1) I had attended his clinics, saw the teacher as many did. But after I got acquainted with Richard, I was always impressed that he remembered me and called me by name at each event that followed, making it always a delight to see him. And 2) the thrill I had when he contacted me seeking something I had for a book he was working on, after he had helped me with many requests.  ie the master seeking help from the pupil. I will always remember him for the friendship he offered, perhaps more than the knowledge he shared.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Brian Carlson
 

I know I responded already but I was thinking about my friendship with Richard, and wanted to share one more memory. When I first got the courage to email him off list, I addressed him as Mr. Hendrickson,. (I was approximately 40 years younger than Richard, and the way I was raised first names were not used in initial contacts.) It wasn’t long before he had me calling him Richard. I think that his approachability and gracious nature are what really endeared him to me and probably many others.

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga, NY

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 02, 2014 12:38 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Richard Hendrickson

 

 


Clark Propst
 

I’ve hesitated on writing, not being good at this type of stuff.
I still tell friends about the first presentation of Richard’s I attended. Don’t think my mouth closed the entire time. I’ve asked him about different freight cars over the years and always received emails with images, sometimes without soliciting. Once I asked about a particular ATSF box car and he sent me doors he had had cast for that class. I’ll treasure that model even more now. I’ve been fortunate enough to have sent Richard more freight car photos than I’ve received, but the most humbling honor was having him buy a freight car from me last fall.
Stan Rydarowicz is not on this list. I don’t know how many times he’s commented to me that he really enjoyed Richard’s articles in RMJ on new models. Mainly because he would tell you which were correct, which were close and which were not and let you decide your purchase.
It was MY pleasure Richard...
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

The greatest tragedy of Richard's death is that at 83, he was still a person of physical vitality (to my knowledge, he still flew aerobatics in his own Citabria airplane), and his undiminished productive mind continued on at a pace that those younger might only envy. He was not ready to yet wind down his life; nor was there any need that I last knew about to actually consider doing so.

The Big Hole in his productive life, as many of his railroad friends and students might see it, was that he never produced a Magnum Opus, THE FREIGHT CAR BOOK, that would have summarized for posterity the vast amount of data that he accumulated over a lifetime of interest, and which only exists in part in widely scattered publications, most of which were low-volume (even by our standards) and defunct to boot. The high value of such accumulated knowledge and data only gains the high acclaim that posterity requires when it is actually published for wide critical review.  Richard always explained to me that he was  reluctant to do so  because railroad interests were only a part of his everyday life; and in his retirement, his devotion to flying and aerobatics (for instance) quite often took precedence, if only because advancing age of pilots and the FAA eventually close at a single point.

I believe that it is safe to say that the  person closest to Richard in the sharing of railroad interests in general, and freight car interests in particular, is Tony Thompson; and at some appropriate and respectful time, I would hope that he might weigh in on how Richard would have liked to have made all of this knowledge available to those who follow.

R.I.P.

Denny



    

 
Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA






MARK OLSTYN
 

I met Richard early on at Naperville and had the the privilege to talk with him a couple of times. He truly was an exceptional person. The depth of his knowledge was amazing. As much as his loss to the modeling world is, is it possible to create a compendium of all the railroading comments he made to this list and others who received information from him, with the real facts according to Richard Hendrickson. An awful lot of railroad knowledge passed with him and we'll never be able to ask him any more questions. Could this knowledge be compiled some how before it's lost for all time? It would be a great tribute to him.
                                                                                                    Mark Olstyn
                                                                                                    Grosse Pointe Park, MI    


rwitt_2000
 

Richard's passing is sad news indeed. Richard was a friend and colleague. He was full of life with much more to give.

He was a trained academic and that is how he treated the study of steam era freight cars.

Richard will be missed.

Bob Witt


CJ Riley
 

I have hesitated to respond since it could easily be repetitious, but Richard was a great help with the freight car chapter in my book. In the end, I could only think of an expression I have heard:

"When someone dies, a library burns."

Never more appropriate than now. RIP Richard.


CJ Riley
Port Ludlow WA

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Armand Premo
 

Nicely said..A Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, July 04, 2014 10:53 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Richard Hendrickson

 

The greatest tragedy of Richard's death is that at 83, he was still a person of physical vitality (to my knowledge, he still flew aerobatics in his own Citabria airplane), and his undiminished productive mind continued on at a pace that those younger might only envy. He was not ready to yet wind down his life; nor was there any need that I last knew about to actually consider doing so.


The Big Hole in his productive life, as many of his railroad friends and students might see it, was that he never produced a Magnum Opus, THE FREIGHT CAR BOOK, that would have summarized for posterity the vast amount of data that he accumulated over a lifetime of interest, and which only exists in part in widely scattered publications, most of which were low-volume (even by our standards) and defunct to boot. The high value of such accumulated knowledge and data only gains the high acclaim that posterity requires when it is actually published for wide critical review.   Richard always explained to me that he was  reluctant to do so  because railroad interests were only a part of his everyday life; and in his retirement, his devotion to flying and aerobatics (for instance) quite often took precedence, if only because advancing age of pilots and the FAA eventually close at a single point.

I believe that it is safe to say that the  person closest to Richard in the sharing of railroad interests in general, and freight car interests in particular, is Tony Thompson; and at some appropriate and respectful time, I would hope that he might weigh in on how Richard would have liked to have made all of this knowledge available to those who follow.

R.I.P.

Denny



    


Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA





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Tony Thompson
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

The Big Hole in his productive life, as many of his railroad friends and students might see it, was that he never produced a Magnum Opus, THE FREIGHT CAR BOOK, that would have summarized for posterity the vast amount of data that he accumulated over a lifetime of interest, and which only exists in part in widely scattered publications, most of which were low-volume (even by our standards) and defunct to boot. The high value of such accumulated knowledge and data only gains the high acclaim that posterity requires when it is actually published for wide critical review.   

I believe that it is safe to say that the  person closest to Richard in the sharing of railroad interests in general, and freight car interests in particular, is Tony Thompson; and at some appropriate and respectful time, I would hope that he might weigh in on how Richard would have liked to have made all of this knowledge available to those who follow..


       Denny, you are right in a way, and Richard did talk from time to time about a “big book,” to be all about tank cars. I believe he never really started, being a little daunted by the magnitude of the task, though I often tried to encourage to try a chapter and see if it would get him going. 
        But remember he DID do three books about Santa Fe freight cars, and most of the writing in the book he co-authored with Ed Kaminski, on Billboard Refrigerator Cars.
        I also think he felt that the impact of numerous magazine articles (he published more than 400) was important too, and reached a lot of people.

Tony Thompson


tjcataldo
 


i know its too soon but i hope richard collection photo notes ect ect goes The California State Railroad Museum so all
enjoy what richard did

  tom


On Fri, Jul 4, 2014 at 12:02 PM, Anthony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

The Big Hole in his productive life, as many of his railroad friends and students might see it, was that he never produced a Magnum Opus, THE FREIGHT CAR BOOK, that would have summarized for posterity the vast amount of data that he accumulated over a lifetime of interest, and which only exists in part in widely scattered publications, most of which were low-volume (even by our standards) and defunct to boot. The high value of such accumulated knowledge and data only gains the high acclaim that posterity requires when it is actually published for wide critical review.   

I believe that it is safe to say that the  person closest to Richard in the sharing of railroad interests in general, and freight car interests in particular, is Tony Thompson; and at some appropriate and respectful time, I would hope that he might weigh in on how Richard would have liked to have made all of this knowledge available to those who follow..


       Denny, you are right in a way, and Richard did talk from time to time about a “big book,” to be all about tank cars. I believe he never really started, being a little daunted by the magnitude of the task, though I often tried to encourage to try a chapter and see if it would get him going. 
        But remember he DID do three books about Santa Fe freight cars, and most of the writing in the book he co-authored with Ed Kaminski, on Billboard Refrigerator Cars.
        I also think he felt that the impact of numerous magazine articles (he published more than 400) was important too, and reached a lot of people.

Tony Thompson




--
Thomas  j Cataldo


greg kennelly
 

I first met Richard at the NMRA National Convention in Sacramento in 2011 but we had corresponded for a number of years prior to that.  Along with Ian Cranstone, Richard provided me with immeasurable help in trying to work my way through the intricacies of the British American Oil Company tank car fleet, and the time-frame for the various paint schemes.  While his own modelling was in HO scale, he was sufficiently knowledgeable to be able to clearly indicate what needed to be changed on some available N-scale models in order to create the cars I wanted.  I now need to get myself organized and complete those models to serve as a reminder of his willingness to help.

He will be missed.

RIP Richard, and condolences to Sandra and family.

Greg Kennelly
Burnaby, BC
CANADA



Ian Cranstone
 

I can't say I knew Richard as well as many on this list, but like many, did benefit from his knowledge and his willingness to share.  On a few occasions I was able to send things back his way, from roster information to occasional photographs to assist his efforts.  Richard was always wonderful to correspond with, and I will miss his many postings, which always amazed me with their frequency and depth of knowledge which they displayed.

Like Tony, I was hoping that he would get started on that tank car book -- which in my case had a particular self interest.  Some years ago, Stafford Swain enlisted both of us in an effort to better understand the Canadian tank car fleet, and we hoped that Richard would explain much about tank cars to us.  I had hoped to ask Richard more questions as I learned more, and sadly I will not get that chance now.

I never did cross paths with Richard - between such distractions as employment, and a busy schedule with my dogs (sledding and agility), I find myself with few opportunities to get to conventions.  We have lost a tremendous asset to the hobby, and a truly inspirational man.  My condolences to his family, and I hope that some way can be found to have his collection of material somehow continue to benefit the hobby as a whole.

Ian Cranstone

Osgoode, Ontario, Canada

lamontc@...

http://freightcars.nakina.net


Armand Premo
 

    Truly a Renaissance Man.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, July 04, 2014 3:02 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Richard Hendrickson

 

Denny Anspach wrote:

The Big Hole in his productive life, as many of his railroad friends and students might see it, was that he never produced a Magnum Opus, THE FREIGHT CAR BOOK, that would have summarized for posterity the vast amount of data that he accumulated over a lifetime of interest, and which only exists in part in widely scattered publications, most of which were low-volume (even by our standards) and defunct to boot. The high value of such accumulated knowledge and data only gains the high acclaim that posterity requires when it is actually published for wide critical review.   

I believe that it is safe to say that the  person closest to Richard in the sharing of railroad interests in general, and freight car interests in particular, is Tony Thompson; and at some appropriate and respectful time, I would hope that he might weigh in on how Richard would have liked to have made all of this knowledge available to those who follow..


       Denny, you are right in a way, and Richard did talk from time to time about a “big book,” to be all about tank cars. I believe he never really started, being a little daunted by the magnitude of the task, though I often tried to encourage to try a chapter and see if it would get him going. 
        But remember he DID do three books about Santa Fe freight cars, and most of the writing in the book he co-authored with Ed Kaminski, on Billboard Refrigerator Cars.
        I also think he felt that the impact of numerous magazine articles (he published more than 400) was important too, and reached a lot of people.

Tony Thompson

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Andy Harman
 

To add to all that has been said... though Richard's passion was steam era freight cars, he saw the bigger picture of prototype modeling and the importance and value of people getting together for a meet to share information and modeling techniques, regardless of our area of interest. Instrumental in taking model building away from the contest mentality and scoring points and jealously guarding trade secrets, to the open atmosphere we enjoy at RPM meets all over the country today.

Technically I have no business being on the Steam Era Freight Car List, since I decided back around 17-18 years ago to concentrate on modeling the mid 1970s N&W. But there is so much knowledge here - as well as others who model outside the subject area, that there's too much to be missed by not being here. Of course thousands of steam era freight cars operated in the 1970s and while off topic here, the cars themselves are still largely the same.

I recall a conversation I had with Richard, who was giving me a little grief about modeling the NYC in the steam era, and my favorite locomotive being the Niagara. Which he said was ugly and a few other words. I said "Well think of it as an FEF-3 built to eastern clearances". And his response with a twinkle in his eye was something like "I believe I said that".

Also at one of the shows - and I forget which - Richard put together a complete Santa Fe train of his freight cars and operated it on one of the show layouts. It wasn't just an era-appropriate train with period freights. It was an exact model, end to end, of a train that ran on the Santa Fe one a specific date - end to end, I believe all cars with the correct numbers from an actual manifest. Including the locomotive. That's prototype modeling, I'm lucky to approximate it with a 12 car passenger train - he nailed it with a 35 car freight train.

All in all, I didn't know Richard nearly as well as hundreds of others, yet I still have "Richard stories" to tell. Many of them are a whole story in a one-line response. I'm sure many more will be told in the coming weeks, and they should be collected someplace for future generations.

As to a memorial freight car - well, in order to be legitimate I need to find a Santa Fe freight car from Richard's era that saw service east of Chicago into the 1970s. I don't think he'd mind appropriate data and an ACI label.

Andy


riverman_vt@...
 

     Agreed Andy. While not an STMFC qualified freight car, it was my slip up when milling

unnecessary underbody detail off of a Rivarossi 12-1 carbody six weeks ago that led to the discovery last week that the Branchline sides could drop right in place on a Rivarossi core

if the Rivarossi sides were simply removed! I cannot help but wonder how many freight car rebuilds, kitbashes or conversions have been based upon similar discoveries brought about

by such a slip up.

 

Cordiually, Don Valentine


Richard Hendrickson
 

Dear Tom,
     Richard’s collection of 60,000 rolling stock photos is destined to go to the California State Railroad Museum, for sure, so everyone can access it.
Yours,
     Sandra
On Jul 4, 2014, at 12:44 PM, Tom Cataldo cataldotj@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


i know its too soon but i hope richard collection photo notes ect ect goes The California State Railroad Museum so all
enjoy what richard did

  tom


On Fri, Jul 4, 2014 at 12:02 PM, Anthony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

The Big Hole in his productive life, as many of his railroad friends and students might see it, was that he never produced a Magnum Opus, THE FREIGHT CAR BOOK, that would have summarized for posterity the vast amount of data that he accumulated over a lifetime of interest, and which only exists in part in widely scattered publications, most of which were low-volume (even by our standards) and defunct to boot. The high value of such accumulated knowledge and data only gains the high acclaim that posterity requires when it is actually published for wide critical review.   

I believe that it is safe to say that the  person closest to Richard in the sharing of railroad interests in general, and freight car interests in particular, is Tony Thompson; and at some appropriate and respectful time, I would hope that he might weigh in on how Richard would have liked to have made all of this knowledge available to those who follow..


       Denny, you are right in a way, and Richard did talk from time to time about a “big book,” to be all about tank cars. I believe he never really started, being a little daunted by the magnitude of the task, though I often tried to encourage to try a chapter and see if it would get him going. 
        But remember he DID do three books about Santa Fe freight cars, and most of the writing in the book he co-authored with Ed Kaminski, on Billboard Refrigerator Cars.
        I also think he felt that the impact of numerous magazine articles (he published more than 400) was important too, and reached a lot of people.

Tony Thompson




-- 
Thomas  j Cataldo




Sandra Hendrickson



midrly
 

I'll join in a little late here.

My personal knowledge of Richard Hendrickson was limited to having met him at the Toronto 2003 NMRA National.  When others were jumping ship and the hobby press was all but reporting this convention cancelled due to a SARS scare, he was one of the clinicians who ignored this and came to Toronto. He was part of an FOFTC barbecue at the convention as well.  Wish that I could have gone to it.

Reading a book on Carnegie libraries in Ontario, I saw mention of the Simplified Spelling Board, which Andrew Carnegie had a part in.  I mentioned this tangentially in an STMFC post, to which Dr. Hendrickson replied that he'd email later about this.  An email followed in which he described in detail the Board and its work.

It's obvious that he gave so much of himself, privately, on this board, in the hobby press, and in giving model manufacturers advice on new products.  I have a number of STMFC's both to build and that I am building now, and they are at least in part supported by articles written by Richard.  A Santa Fe Bx-12 that I working on is a small reminder to me of his work and his sharing with us.

We've so much to work with as STMFC modellers because of Dr. Richard Hendrickson.   

Steve Lucas.