ATSF Bx-27 in series 138000-138499


genegreen1942@...
 

Just received a Red Caboose ATSF box car kit # RC-8030-4i.  Car is numbered ATSF 138019 and appears to match some photos I've found of cars in ATSF Bx-27 series 138000-138499 except for one significant particular.  More on that later.


From the only photo -builder's photo, I assume - found so far I know to use the Youngstown doors and the Ajax hand brake.  The trucks in the kit's box do not appear correct but I won't worry about that until after an opportunity to see what extra trucks I have on hand.  I assume the rectangular panel roof and wood running boards are correct.  Anyone?


The model has Grand Canyon Line lettering on the left side and a straight-line map on the right.  The photo I found shows the B end and right side.  There is no map and the reporting marks are A.T.& S.F. in the photo and ATSF on the model.


If I have my facts straight the ATSF 138000-138499 series was built in early 1937.  Is it likely that the car would have been repainted as on the model by September 1950?


Gene Green



George Hollwedel
 

Yes,

1947 saw the maps replaced with the "Ship& Travel" slogan but by 1950 there were many maps still around.
 
Prototype N Scale Models (TM)
by George Hollwedel
2108 Buffalo Tundra Dr
Austin, TX 78754-5960
512-579-0539
http://www.micro-trains.com/hollwedel.php
http://www.atlasrr.com/special.htm
http://intermountain-railway.com/n/sr/nsr.htm
http://www.bluford-shops.com/bluford_93_014.htm

From: "genegreen1942@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2014 6:33 PM
Subject: [STMFC] ATSF Bx-27 in series 138000-138499



Just received a Red Caboose ATSF box car kit # RC-8030-4i.  Car is numbered ATSF 138019 and appears to match some photos I've found of cars in ATSF Bx-27 series 138000-138499 except for one significant particular.  More on that later.

From the only photo -builder's photo, I assume - found so far I know to use the Youngstown doors and the Ajax hand brake.  The trucks in the kit's box do not appear correct but I won't worry about that until after an opportunity to see what extra trucks I have on hand.  I assume the rectangular panel roof and wood running boards are correct.  Anyone?

The model has Grand Canyon Line lettering on the left side and a straight-line map on the right.  The photo I found shows the B end and right side.  There is no map and the reporting marks are A.T.& S.F. in the photo and ATSF on the model.

If I have my facts straight the ATSF 138000-138499 series was built in early 1937.  Is it likely that the car would have been repainted as on the model by September 1950?

Gene Green






Tony Thompson
 

Gene Green] wrote:

 
Just received a Red Caboose ATSF box car kit # RC-8030-4i.  Car is numbered ATSF 138019 and appears to match some photos I've found of cars in ATSF Bx-27 series 138000-138499 except for one significant particular.  More on that later.

The model has Grand Canyon Line lettering on the left side and a straight-line map on the right.  The photo I found shows the B end and right side.  There is no map and the reporting marks are A.T.& S.F. in the photo and ATSF on the model.


     When the car was built in 1937, Santa Fe did still use both the ampersand and the periods in reporting marks, but the ampersand went in 1938 and the periods in 1943. Since maps and train slogans arrived in 1940, the car obviously represents a repaint between 1943 and 1947. In 1947, maps were replaced with the legend, "Ship and Travel Santa Fe all the way."

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Allan Smith
 

ATSF Bx-27 boxcars had early Duryea underframes. That would show up by having the couplers stand out from the end of the car by about a foot. If you don't want to model the Duryea underframe you can at least simulate it by moving the coupler pockets out that one foot distance. Also these cars were delivered before the map schemes. So the car you have would represent a repainted car.

Al Smith


genegreen1942@...
 

Thanks to all who responded with info about the Santa Fe Bx-27 box car.  Special thanks to Al for mentioning the Duryea underframe.  I'll have to look into that some to decide how I'll handle it.  I guess, given that by September 1950 the paint job would have some age and steam-locomotive applied dirt, I'll have to give it some pretty heavy weathering.
Again, thanks to all who responded.
Gene Green


---In STMFC@..., <smithal9@...> wrote :

ATSF Bx-27 boxcars had early Duryea underframes. That would show up by having the couplers stand out from the end of the car by about a foot. If you don't want to model the Duryea underframe you can at least simulate it by moving the coupler pockets out that one foot distance. Also these cars were delivered before the map schemes. So the car you have would represent a repainted car.

Al Smith


mopacfirst
 

Here's what I did.

This is before a lot of the detailed information on such cars, and perhaps even before there was a Sunshine kit for the Duryea underframe.  I had good photos, which are not hard to come by for Santa Fe, and I knew about the underframe but didn't know exactly what was under there.

I mounted the kit draft gear boxes out the appropriate distance.  I believe it's normally 7" each end, but that can be determined by comparing these cars with other typical cars of the same length.  I'd have to turn the car upside down to see, but I bet I somehow filled in the gap between the end of the center sill and the coupler.  (You have to do that on some Intermountain cars anyway, unless you don't mind the toothless look.)  Then I sliced off the two sidesill tabs and relocated one to a position about halfway between the originals, which can be determined from the photos since the lettering helps locate them a bit closer to correct position.  Then I sliced off the crossmembers and repositioned one of them to match the sidesill tab.

Not perfect, but not that visible from the side either.

Ron Merrick


mopacfirst
 

Found one.  I'd forgotten about the terrible Intermountain coupler boxes, so it turns out that the car has Kadee coupler boxes (with #5 couplers, given the age of the model) which seemingly fit against the existing underframe end and thus extend out about the right amount.

From the underside, the car just looks like it has one less crossbearer than a normal ARA/AAR boxcar.  Trucks are Accurail.

Additional modeling notes:  Santa Fe was pretty good about lowering tackboards, after 1954, but wood running boards were not normally changed so you're in good shape there.

Ron Merrick


Bill Vaughn
 



On Monday, July 21, 2014 4:47 PM, "ron.merrick@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Here's what I did.

This is before a lot of the detailed information on such cars, and perhaps even before there was a Sunshine kit for the Duryea underframe.  I had good photos, which are not hard to come by for Santa Fe, and I knew about the underframe but didn't know exactly what was under there.

I mounted the kit draft gear boxes out the appropriate distance.  I believe it's normally 7" each end, but that can be determined by comparing these cars with other typical cars of the same length.  I'd have to turn the car upside down to see, but I bet I somehow filled in the gap between the end of the center sill and the coupler.  (You have to do that on some Intermountain cars anyway, unless you don't mind the toothless look.)  Then I sliced off the two sidesill tabs and relocated one to a position about halfway between the originals, which can be determined from the photos since the lettering helps locate them a bit closer to correct position.  Then I sliced off the crossmembers and repositioned one of them to match the sidesill tab.

Not perfect, but not that visible from the side either.

Ron Merrick



 

Another thing to be aware of are the ends. Bx-27's had "square" cornered ends. Red Caboose and IMWX are the only 2 plastic manufacturers that do that car.

Rich Christie


On Wednesday, July 23, 2014 2:32 PM, "bill Vaughn atsfmodlr@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:


 


On Monday, July 21, 2014 4:47 PM, "ron.merrick@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Here's what I did.

This is before a lot of the detailed information on such cars, and perhaps even before there was a Sunshine kit for the Duryea underframe.  I had good photos, which are not hard to come by for Santa Fe, and I knew about the underframe but didn't know exactly what was under there.

I mounted the kit draft gear boxes out the appropriate distance.  I believe it's normally 7" each end, but that can be determined by comparing these cars with other typical cars of the same length.  I'd have to turn the car upside down to see, but I bet I somehow filled in the gap between the end of the center sill and the coupler.  (You have to do that on some Intermountain cars anyway, unless you don't mind the toothless look.)  Then I sliced off the two sidesill tabs and relocated one to a position about halfway between the originals, which can be determined from the photos since the lettering helps locate them a bit closer to correct position.  Then I sliced off the crossmembers and repositioned one of them to match the sidesill tab.

Not perfect, but not that visible from the side either.

Ron Merrick