Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels


Andy Carlson
 

Hello everyone-

Many know that Tahoe Model Works' HO trucks utilize Intermountain Railways' wheel sets, and as such are dependent on the availability to support semi-scale wheeled truck's production.

I always recommend getting these trucks while available, and now is one of those times.

I am offering all fourteen of Tahoe Model Work's HO trucks with semi-scale wheels. they are as follows:

201  Dalman 2-level plain 50-ton
202  Dalman 2-level with lateral motion device 50-ton
203  AC&F arch bar
204  Bettendorf swing-motion caboose
205  Barber-Bettendorf Swing-motion caboose
206  Buckeye cast steel truck w/ spring plank
207  Double truss cast steel 50-ton
208  Cast steel coil-elliptic 50-ton
209  Barber Lateral Motion 50-ton
210  ASF 70-ton A3 ride control
211  "Old Time" 5'0" w.b. archbar
212  USRA Andrews
213  Barber S-2 w/ spring plank
214  Scullin 40-ton w/ spring plank

All trucks are factory new, in Factory packaging and are offered for sale at $7.25/pair.  Shipping is $3 and up, dependent on weight.
I accept checks and money orders. For a small fee I also accept PayPal.

To view these trucks, go to Jim Hayes' "Sunshine Models" web site, and click on "Links and scroll to "Tahoe Model Works".

******* Contact me OFF-LIST (PLEASE) at *******

thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


midrly
 

Have you seen Rapido Trains'  HO Code 88 wheelsets?  I like the "wrought steel" look of the plates of the backs of the wheelsets.  These are nice sets that I've refitted a few of my STMFC's with.  Sold in boxes of fifty as well as twelve-packs.


Mark Steigerwald
 


Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

A gentle reminder: semi-scale wheel sets are definitely not  all alike, and in this regard, there is no such thing as *one size fits all!".  Although I have yet to come across any of the current semi-scale wheels that are not acceptable either with reference to appearance or contour, the shape of the ends (broad conical, or pin point), the end material (metal, or plastic) and lengths of the axles on which the wheels are mounted  can and will make a world of  difference as to how in real life they will function in any given truck application. 

The popular pin point IM sets had axles measuring 1.012-15" for years until without notice they changed manufacturers, and the axles changed significantly to 1.007-1.012"-  a significant difference. 

The Branchline semiscale pin point wheelsets (no longer available, I believe) measured 1.018"-1.020".  

The fine Kadee wheels measure a reliable 1.015", but have have relatively borad Delrin ends.

 The NWSL wheel sets have relatively broad ends. 

The pinpoint Reboxx wheels have a huge range of axle lengths (also available double insulated- a real boon for installation in metal trucks).

The combination of semiscale wheels and maximum (maximum!) real time rollability have been my gold standard benchmark for almost 12 years, and I feel that my efforts in this regard have been repaid many times over when everyday, I can admire long  strings of fine freight cars rolling effortlessly and quietly through the environs of my layout.  A lot of this has been enabled by tailoring each truck, or type of truck to maximum rollability, and this has often required wheels sets of varied axle lengths, or axles of different types. My usual standard  wheelset is Reboxx, and I keep a full supply.  Some recent 3-axle metal truck conversions worked best with an wheel sets inboard, and a Branchline set in the middle (this combination alone almost tripled the trucks tested rollability).  Other metal trucks do best with the Kadee wheels (the Delrin./metal combination can be especially good).  The Central Valley trucks work best with the pin point axles inasmuch as the angle of the conical bearing holes is narrower than the nominal NMRA angle commonly inhabiting most other trucks.

More than you really wanted to know this Monday morning....

Denny 



 

 



   
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA


Andy Carlson
 

I don't understand your point, as you have shared this many times over the years. Tahoe trucks run very well, perhaps the best in the whole industry-EVER. I think over analyzing something that performs already to peak satisfaction  isn't accomplishing much. There are many areas left to joust over. All Tahoe trucks run well within the .006" range axle lengths you have noted.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


From: "Denny Anspach danspachmd@... [STMFC]"
To: Steam Era Freight Car List
Sent: Monday, September 8, 2014 9:57 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels

 
A gentle reminder: semi-scale wheel sets are definitely not  all alike, and in this regard, there is no such thing as *one size fits all!".  Although I have yet to come across any of the current semi-scale wheels that are not acceptable either with reference to appearance or contour, the shape of the ends (broad conical, or pin point), the end material (metal, or plastic) and lengths of the axles on which the wheels are mounted  can and will make a world of  difference as to how in real life they will function in any given truck application. 

The popular pin point IM sets had axles measuring 1.012-15" for years until without notice they changed manufacturers, and the axles changed significantly to 1.007-1.012"-  a significant difference. 

The Branchline semiscale pin point wheelsets (no longer available, I believe) measured 1.018"-1.020".  

The fine Kadee wheels measure a reliable 1.015", but have have relatively borad Delrin ends.

 The NWSL wheel sets have relatively broad ends. 

The pinpoint Reboxx wheels have a huge range of axle lengths (also available double insulated- a real boon for installation in metal trucks).

The combination of semiscale wheels and maximum (maximum!) real time rollability have been my gold standard benchmark for almost 12 years, and I feel that my efforts in this regard have been repaid many times over when everyday, I can admire long  strings of fine freight cars rolling effortlessly and quietly through the environs of my layout.  A lot of this has been enabled by tailoring each truck, or type of truck to maximum rollability, and this has often required wheels sets of varied axle lengths, or axles of different types. My usual standard  wheelset is Reboxx, and I keep a full supply.  Some recent 3-axle metal truck conversions worked best with an wheel sets inboard, and a Branchline set in the middle (this combination alone almost tripled the trucks tested rollability).  Other metal trucks do best with the Kadee wheels (the Delrin./metal combination can be especially good).  The Central Valley trucks work best with the pin point axles inasmuch as the angle of the conical bearing holes is narrower than the nominal NMRA angle commonly inhabiting most other trucks.

More than you really wanted to know this Monday morning....

Denny 



 

 



   
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA




Aley, Jeff A
 

Andy,

 

               I suspect that Denny’s point is that those who wish to change to a different type of wheelset (e.g. someone mentioned using Rapido wheelsets) should be forearmed with knowledge, and not think that “all wheelsets are equal”.  It would be a shame if someone maligned the fine Tahoe trucks if they put in poorly-fitting wheelsets, and ignorantly blamed the trucks!

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 10:12 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels

 

 

I don't understand your point, as you have shared this many times over the years. Tahoe trucks run very well, perhaps the best in the whole industry-EVER. I think over analyzing something that performs already to peak satisfaction  isn't accomplishing much. There are many areas left to joust over. All Tahoe trucks run well within the .006" range axle lengths you have noted.

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA

 


From: "Denny Anspach danspachmd@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: Steam Era Freight Car List <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, September 8, 2014 9:57 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels

 

 

A gentle reminder: semi-scale wheel sets are definitely not  all alike, and in this regard, there is no such thing as *one size fits all!".  Although I have yet to come across any of the current semi-scale wheels that are not acceptable either with reference to appearance or contour, the shape of the ends (broad conical, or pin point), the end material (metal, or plastic) and lengths of the axles on which the wheels are mounted  can and will make a world of  difference as to how in real life they will function in any given truck application. 

 

The popular pin point IM sets had axles measuring 1.012-15" for years until without notice they changed manufacturers, and the axles changed significantly to 1.007-1.012"-  a significant difference. 

 

The Branchline semiscale pin point wheelsets (no longer available, I believe) measured 1.018"-1.020".  

 

The fine Kadee wheels measure a reliable 1.015", but have have relatively borad Delrin ends.

 

 The NWSL wheel sets have relatively broad ends. 

 

The pinpoint Reboxx wheels have a huge range of axle lengths (also available double insulated- a real boon for installation in metal trucks).

 

The combination of semiscale wheels and maximum (maximum!) real time rollability have been my gold standard benchmark for almost 12 years, and I feel that my efforts in this regard have been repaid many times over when everyday, I can admire long  strings of fine freight cars rolling effortlessly and quietly through the environs of my layout.  A lot of this has been enabled by tailoring each truck, or type of truck to maximum rollability, and this has often required wheels sets of varied axle lengths, or axles of different types. My usual standard  wheelset is Reboxx, and I keep a full supply.  Some recent 3-axle metal truck conversions worked best with an wheel sets inboard, and a Branchline set in the middle (this combination alone almost tripled the trucks tested rollability).  Other metal trucks do best with the Kadee wheels (the Delrin./metal combination can be especially good).  The Central Valley trucks work best with the pin point axles inasmuch as the angle of the conical bearing holes is narrower than the nominal NMRA angle commonly inhabiting most other trucks.

 

More than you really wanted to know this Monday morning....

 

Denny 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

Denny S. Anspach, MD

Sacramento, CA

 

 


Mikebrock
 

Andy Carlson writes regarding Denny Anspach's comments about semi scale wheels and possible truck applications:


"I don't understand your point, as you have shared this many times over the years."

Well, I think Denny was pointing out the various applications of semi scale wheels to a variety of different manufacturer's trucks. Being a modeler of a few more yrs than some perhaps and, therefore, the owner of a variety of different trucks, I found it quite useful. Some of this is because I haven't done enough research into the various wheel axle lengths of available wheels and truck dimensions.

"Tahoe trucks run very well, perhaps the best in the whole industry-EVER."

I don't disagree with that...given what I have heard. However, [ don't tell anyone ] I don't have any. I've been spending too much time making sure DCC functions during my Jan op session during Prototype Rails and haven't pursued Tahoe trucks. Yes, I have been sleeping with the NCE manual. However, we definitely need a vendor at Prototype Rails selling Tahoe trucks [ hint ].

"I think over analyzing something that performs already to peak satisfaction isn't accomplishing much."

Well, it is if you put the wrong wheel in the wrong truck. Note, that Denny did not refer to Tahoe trucks.
Also, note the STMFC rule: "Members are permitted to criticize or praise manufacturer's products free from criticism from other members." And, "Thus, all
admin, security, or "policing" functions will be conducted only by myself or my representatives."

" There are many areas left to joust over. All Tahoe trucks run well within the .006" range axle lengths you have noted."

Good. Now all I have to do is find some Tahoe's.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Armand Premo
 


Which brings up another issue.......................rolling quality.I would like to hear what members of this list do in the attempt to standardize the  rolling quality of their freight car fleet .Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 7:41 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels

 


Andy Carlson writes regarding Denny Anspach's comments about semi scale
wheels and possible truck applications:

"I don't understand your point, as you have shared this many times over the
years."

Well, I think Denny was pointing out the various applications of semi scale
wheels to a variety of different manufacturer's trucks. Being a modeler of
a few more yrs than some perhaps and, therefore, the owner of a variety of
different trucks, I found it quite useful. Some of this is because I haven't
done enough research into the various wheel axle lengths of available wheels
and truck dimensions.

"Tahoe trucks run very well, perhaps the best in the whole industry-EVER."

I don't disagree with that...given what I have heard. However, [ don't tell
anyone ] I don't have any. I've been spending too much time making sure DCC
functions during my Jan op session during Prototype Rails and haven't
pursued Tahoe trucks. Yes, I have been sleeping with the NCE manual.
However, we definitely need a vendor at Prototype Rails selling Tahoe trucks
[ hint ].

"I think over analyzing something that performs already to peak
satisfaction isn't accomplishing much."

Well, it is if you put the wrong wheel in the wrong truck. Note, that Denny
did not refer to Tahoe trucks.
Also, note the STMFC rule: "Members are permitted to criticize or praise
manufacturer's products free from criticism from other members." And,
"Thus, all
admin, security, or "policing" functions will be conducted only by myself or
my representatives."

" There are many areas left to joust over. All Tahoe trucks run well within
the .006" range axle lengths you have noted."

Good. Now all I have to do is find some Tahoe's.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4592 / Virus Database: 4015/8178 - Release Date: 09/08/14


Bruce Smith
 

Armand,

First, have a home brew.  Second, don't worry!  Seriously though, I can understand getting close, although again, I wouldn't worry about them all being the same.  And a note... there is an argument that maximal roll might not be desirable for several reasons.  If for example, I want to HAVE to use helpers and my locos are too powerful, a little rolling resistance might be desirable.  Likewise if my yards/sidings are not perfectly level.

I select wheel sets that spin freely in the truck, but the ends do not wobbly.  I sometimes ream the bearing holes to improve this and rarely, add graphite to the bearing.  It usually takes me about 2 minutes per car to get it where I want it, rolling wise.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 6:50 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels



Which brings up another issue.......................rolling quality.I would like to hear what members of this list do in the attempt to standardize the  rolling quality of their freight car fleet .Armand Premo


Armand Premo
 


Bruce,We strive to standardize car weight and couplers yet with the variety of wheel sets available do we attempt to standardize?.My motive power is rated for tonnage,but if I want to have realistic sized trains there should be a degree of uniformity in rolling performance.Admittedly level track is desirable-Armand Premo-- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 8:07 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels

 

Armand,

First, have a home brew.  Second, don't worry!  Seriously though, I can understand getting close, although again, I wouldn't worry about them all being the same.  And a note... there is an argument that maximal roll might not be desirable for several reasons.  If for example, I want to HAVE to use helpers and my locos are too powerful, a little rolling resistance might be desirable.  Likewise if my yards/sidings are not perfectly level.

I select wheel sets that spin freely in the truck, but the ends do not wobbly.  I sometimes ream the bearing holes to improve this and rarely, add graphite to the bearing.  It usually takes me about 2 minutes per car to get it where I want it, rolling wise.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 6:50 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels



Which brings up another issue.......................rolling quality.I would like to hear what members of this list do in the attempt to standardize the  rolling quality of their freight car fleet .Armand Premo

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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4592 / Virus Database: 4015/8178 - Release Date: 09/08/14


Aley, Jeff A
 

Denny’s efforts to objectively measure and optimize rollability are well-documented.  I will say that the RESULT of such tuning is visible on his layout.  It includes some grades, and many trains are pulled by steam locomotives.  Many of us have steamers that do not pull as well as we may desire; the free-rolling trucks make it possible to pull a train of a “handsome” length up the grade on his model railroad.  I have not encountered any issues with his cars when doing yard switching; industrial switching areas are still under construction.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 5:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels

 

 



Bruce,We strive to standardize car weight and couplers yet with the variety of wheel sets available do we attempt to standardize?.My motive power is rated for tonnage,but if I want to have realistic sized trains there should be a degree of uniformity in rolling performance.Admittedly level track is desirable-Armand Premo-- Original Message -----

To: STMFC@...

Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 8:07 PM

Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels

 

 

Armand,

 

First, have a home brew.  Second, don't worry!  Seriously though, I can understand getting close, although again, I wouldn't worry about them all being the same.  And a note... there is an argument that maximal roll might not be desirable for several reasons.  If for example, I want to HAVE to use helpers and my locos are too powerful, a little rolling resistance might be desirable.  Likewise if my yards/sidings are not perfectly level.

 

I select wheel sets that spin freely in the truck, but the ends do not wobbly.  I sometimes ream the bearing holes to improve this and rarely, add graphite to the bearing.  It usually takes me about 2 minutes per car to get it where I want it, rolling wise.

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 6:50 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels



Which brings up another issue.......................rolling quality.I would like to hear what members of this list do in the attempt to standardize the  rolling quality of their freight car fleet .Armand Premo

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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4592 / Virus Database: 4015/8178 - Release Date: 09/08/14


Mikebrock
 

Bruce Smith says:

"First, have a home brew."

My sentiments exactly.

"Second, don't worry!"

More good advice.

Armand says: "Bruce,We strive to standardize car weight and couplers yet with the variety of wheel sets available do we attempt to standardize?. "

Huh? Car weight? I couldn't care less what a car weighs. Yes, I know the NMRA has its "standard" and that's fine with me. I recall building a Westerfield GN SS 50 ft auto car and proudly painted and decaled it. Then I proudly noticed that I had not added any weight to its interior. Hmmm. OK, following Richard's view that the bottom should only be viewed from trackside [ what?, me have a derailment? ] I merely inserted flexible lead weights inside the 2 center sills. Voila! And, I might note that several "bo's" thanked me for leaving all that open space in the car's interior.

Standardize couplers? Who says? I have Kadee 5's and Kadee 58's on various cars. I have no idea which. I do put 58's on new stuff. You mean I should retrofit? Are you serious?

I will also admit that I filed a flat spot on a car's wheel. Sounds pretty good.

Mike Brock...Bruce, don't forget the home brew next Jan.










Gary Ray
 

Back before Tahoe Trucks became available (20 or so years ago), my friend had purchased a couple of hundred MDC frames and put semi-scale wheelsets in them. I inherited the cars and was having trouble with some derailing. I thought the problem was my trackwork, but it turned out the axles were so loose that some cars actually bottomed out on the loose wheelsets. I have since replaced all the offending wheelsets because I had a quantity of standard ones available. Have to see if I can find a frame that works well with the offending wheelsets (200 or so). Moral: check compatibility before you buy a lot.
Gary Ray

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 4:41 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels


Andy Carlson writes regarding Denny Anspach's comments about semi scale wheels and possible truck applications:


"I don't understand your point, as you have shared this many times over the
years."

Well, I think Denny was pointing out the various applications of semi scale
wheels to a variety of different manufacturer's trucks. Being a modeler of
a few more yrs than some perhaps and, therefore, the owner of a variety of
different trucks, I found it quite useful. Some of this is because I haven't
done enough research into the various wheel axle lengths of available wheels
and truck dimensions.


John Sykes III
 

Although I've made the switch to using Kadee #58's on most of my new freight cars (except where specialty couplers are called for) , I haven't done the switch to code 88 wheelsets at all.  I bought some NWSL code 64 wheelsets for some show models but no 88's.  I guess part of the reason is, I don't know how smooth my track work will end up, and second is my investment in code 110 sets.


I have a Plano 3700 tackle box full of Kadee, IM, Proto 2000 and NWSL 33" and 36" wheelsets with ribbed & smooth backs (also some 38" & 28" sets for modern cars).  I have a Reboxx reamer in the Plano as well.


One thing I generally try to do is use plastic axle wheelsets (e.g., Kadees) on metal trucks and metal axle wheelsets (e.g., IM) on plastic trucks on the theory (which might be false) that plastic to metal rolls smoother than metal to metal or plastic to plastic.  Again, before you all go off on this, this is based on anecdotal evidence, I have no hard data to support this theory.


-- John


Anspach Denny <danspachmd@...>
 

Andy Carson posts: 

>I don't understand your point, as you have shared this many times over the years. Tahoe trucks run very well, perhaps the best in the whole industry-EVER. I think over analyzing something that performs already to peak satisfaction isn't accomplishing much. There are many areas left to joust over. All Tahoe trucks run well within the .006" range axle lengths you have noted<.

H-mmm. 

My comments on semi scale wheels were intended to be, and are of a general variety referring to the choices available, and had no particular or special reference to the Tahoe Trucks (whose rollability is and has been -at least in my hands- exemplary with either the Reboxx or IM wheel sets that have been supplied OEM, or have been installed aftermarket).  

Denny
 
Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento





Armand Premo
 


    Well,well,well Mike.By standardization I mean personal standards or preferences if you will.Operational "Go or No Go".As new products become available I will try them, and only to newly built cars .Getting back to "rollability". and trying to set a standard,what test or tests do individuals use? We have minimum standards for just about everything. else.I just finished "upgrading" some of my old,but excellent Storzek resin cars.Again,for clarification Mike I added underframe detail,brake rods and the like that I had not  when I initially built  them.Simply put Mike ,upgraded to my own current and personal standards.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 08, 2014 9:00 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tahoe trucks w/ semiscale wheels

 

Bruce Smith says:

"First, have a home brew."

My sentiments exactly.

"Second, don't worry!"

More good advice.

Armand says: "Bruce,We strive to standardize car weight and couplers yet
with the variety of wheel sets available do we attempt to standardize?. "

Huh? Car weight? I couldn't care less what a car weighs. Yes, I know the
NMRA has its "standard" and that's fine with me. I recall building a
Westerfield GN SS 50 ft auto car and proudly painted and decaled it. Then I
proudly noticed that I had not added any weight to its interior. Hmmm. OK,
following Richard's view that the bottom should only be viewed from
trackside [ what?, me have a derailment? ] I merely inserted flexible lead
weights inside the 2 center sills. Voila! And, I might note that several
"bo's" thanked me for leaving all that open space in the car's interior.

Standardize couplers? Who says? I have Kadee 5's and Kadee 58's on various
cars. I have no idea which. I do put 58's on new stuff. You mean I should
retrofit? Are you serious?

I will also admit that I filed a flat spot on a car's wheel. Sounds pretty
good.

Mike Brock...Bruce, don't forget the home brew next Jan.



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jon miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 9/9/2014 2:30 AM, 'A Premo' armprem2@... [STMFC] wrote:
Getting back to "rollability". and trying to set a standard,what test or tests do individuals use?

    Someone once made a moon shaped section of track and, when a truck was place on it, you counted the times it went past center.  This could be a machine for a standard but don't think it's really necessary.  I think Dr. Denny has one of these things.

-- 

Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


ku0a@...
 

The club to which I belong has standards for wheels, trucks, detection, couplers, weight,, rollability, and center of gravity.

Rollability                                                                                                                                   

1.   Rolling stock (excluding locomotives and other track powered equipment) must initiate spontaneous motion on a grade of 2.5 % or LESS and have a  smooth, steady, uninterrupted roll for at least one full car body length.

      2.   There is no rollability allowance/exemption for regular freight cars in regular "interchange" service.

3.   Cabooses, passenger cars, unit trains and MoW cars are in assigned (essentially unit train) service and MAY be exempted at the discretion of the Car Department Foreman on a 'proof only' basis.

The grade specification means that a car will roll spontaneously on any grade. Tahoe Model Works trucks readily meet this specification, while Kadee and Walthers trucks may or may not meet the specification depending upon the wheel sets used.

Nelson Moyer


Benjamin Hom
 

Armand Premo asked:
"Getting back to "rollability". and trying to set a standard, what test or tests do individuals use?"

Jon Miller replied:


"Someone once made a moon shaped section of track and, when a truck was place on it, you counted the times it went past center. This could be a machine for a standard but don't think it's really necessary. I think Dr. Denny has one of these things."
Reboxx Roll Tester:
http://www.reboxx.com/wheelsets.htm#RollTester


Ben Hom


Bruce Smith
 

Nelson,

Not to be picky, but that is not the way I read the standard.  In fact, the car could be a “lead sled” on a grade of 1%, just so long as it starts rolling at or before the grade getting to 2.5%.

BTW, the length of the grade is not specified so the standard is missing an important component ;)

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Sep 9, 2014, at 9:36 AM, ku0a@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
1.   Rolling stock (excluding locomotives and other track powered equipment) must initiate spontaneous motion on a grade of 2.5 % or LESS and have a  smooth, steady, uninterrupted roll for at least one full car body length.

The grade specification means that a car will roll spontaneously on any grade. Tahoe Model Works trucks readily meet this specification, while Kadee and Walthers trucks may or may not meet the specification depending upon the wheel sets used.

Nelson Moyer