Dowell vs Dow Chemical?


Tim O'Connor
 

Two acid tank cars, consecutively numbered, one lettered for
Dow Chemical in Midland Michigan and the other for Dowell?? Was
this the origin of the Dow name or just a weird coincidence?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15541180788/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15107226713/

I can't make out the gallonage on either car. Anyone know?

Tim O'Connor


Ed Hawkins
 


On Nov 22, 2014, at 3:02 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:

Two acid tank cars, consecutively numbered, one lettered for
Dow Chemical in Midland Michigan and the other for Dowell?? Was
this the origin of the Dow name or just a weird coincidence?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15541180788/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15107226713/

I can't make out the gallonage on either car. Anyone know?

Tim,
Dowell, Inc. was incorporated in 1932. Some history about Dow and Dowell can be seen at:


The cars shown at the Barriger Library links were 8,000-gallon, ICC-103B, ACF Type 27 tank cars for muriatic or ferric acid. Lot 1545 was for 3 DOWX cars with R-8369 & R-8370 lettered for Dowell, Inc. and R-8371 lettered for Dow Chemical Co. The two Dowell cars were orange and black while the Dow car was aluminum and black. All cars had black & white stencils. 

ACF built 20 more 8,000 gallon, ICC-103B, Type 27 tank cars of nearly identical design & appearance in 8-37, lots 1722 and 1739 (10 cars each) for Dow Chemical Co. numbered DOWX R-8372 to R-8382 and R-8382 to R-8391, respectively. These were painted in the same aluminum and black scheme with black & white stencils. 

All of these DOWX cars came with an interesting feature, mud-guards fabricated of steel plate to protect the tank from wheel splash. 

The Jan. 1943 ORER doesn't list these car numbers, and the cars were likely renumbered in the 38300-series. 
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Dave Parker
 

Ed:

There is no such thing as "ferric acid", at least formally.  Could this use have been for  ferric chloride solutions, which have fairly broad industrial applications, and are mildly acidic?  AFIK, the ICC/AAR would not have required 103B cars for ferric chloride, but I can see how a shipper might have opted to do so.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Ed Hawkins
 

On Nov 22, 2014, at 9:23 AM, Dave Parker spottab@... [STMFC]
wrote:

There is no such thing as "ferric acid", at least formally.  Could
this use have been for  ferric chloride solutions, which have fairly
broad industrial applications, and are mildly acidic?  AFIK, the
ICC/AAR would not have required 103B cars for ferric chloride, but I
can see how a shipper might have opted to do so.
Dave,
You're correct. From an ACF ledger book that contained information
about the commodities carried in the tank cars they built, my previous
message wasn't correct.

From my notes, lot 1545 specified "Muriatic Acid or Ferric Chromide"
and "Muriatic Acid or Ferric Chloride" for lots 1722 and 1729. I don't
know what Ferric Chromide is, so perhaps I misread the lot 1545
information or wrote it down wrong and that it should also be Ferric
Chloride.

A number of other ICC-103B Type 27 tank cars built from 1935 to 1941
for Penn Salt (PSMX) and Hooker (HOKX) also specified Muriatic Acid or
Ferric Chloride as well.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Ian Cranstone
 


On 2014-11-22, at 4:02 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Two acid tank cars, consecutively numbered, one lettered for
Dow Chemical in Midland Michigan and the other for Dowell?? Was
this the origin of the Dow name or just a weird coincidence?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15541180788/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15107226713/

I can't make out the gallonage on either car. Anyone know?


According to the 7/1937 ORER, DOWX 8370 was 8003 gallons, and DOWX 8371 was 8000 gallons.  There's no mention of Dowell in the ORER listing.  The "R-" prefix in front of the car number meant that the car was rubber-lined.

As Ed Hawkins has already noted, these cars (and successor cars in 1937) were probably renumbered to the 38300 series, as the ORERs indicate that Dow undertook a major fleet renumbering circa 1938-40.  Given the detail in the Dow listing, I think this renumbering can likely be matched up car for car.


Robert J Miller CFA
 

I believe Dowell was a subsidiary of Dow Chemical. Dow Chemical was founded in the late 1800's in Midland, Michigan by Herbert Henry Dow. The firm is one of the largest chemical companies in the world and its headquarters is still located in Midland.
 
Robert J. Miller CFA
Saginaw, MI

Tell the truth, work hard, and come to dinner on time.
Gerald R. Ford



From: "Ian Cranstone lamontc@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, November 22, 2014 11:22 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Dowell vs Dow Chemical?

 

On 2014-11-22, at 4:02 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:

 
Two acid tank cars, consecutively numbered, one lettered for
Dow Chemical in Midland Michigan and the other for Dowell?? Was
this the origin of the Dow name or just a weird coincidence?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15541180788/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15107226713/

I can't make out the gallonage on either car. Anyone know?

According to the 7/1937 ORER, DOWX 8370 was 8003 gallons, and DOWX 8371 was 8000 gallons.  There's no mention of Dowell in the ORER listing.  The "R-" prefix in front of the car number meant that the car was rubber-lined.

As Ed Hawkins has already noted, these cars (and successor cars in 1937) were probably renumbered to the 38300 series, as the ORERs indicate that Dow undertook a major fleet renumbering circa 1938-40.  Given the detail in the Dow listing, I think this renumbering can likely be matched up car for car.




Chuck Soule
 

As I recall from a job I had about 30 years ago for an oil company, Dowell was a subsidiary of Dow Chemical that specialized in oilfield chemicals.

Chuck Soule


Ian Cranstone
 

On 2014-11-22, at 4:02 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Two acid tank cars, consecutively numbered, one lettered for
Dow Chemical in Midland Michigan and the other for Dowell?? Was
this the origin of the Dow name or just a weird coincidence?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15541180788/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15107226713/

I can't make out the gallonage on either car. Anyone know?

After sleuthing through ORERs, I believe DOWX 8370 became DOWX 38328 in late 1939 or early 1940.

DOWX 8371 disappeared from the roster in late 1937 or early 1938, prior to the renumbering of the fleet -- my guess would be that Dowell was spun off to another outfit at this time (apparently under a new name), although the car could possibly have been wrecked.


arved_grass
 

On Sat, 11/22/14, Ed Hawkins hawk0621@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

I don't know what Ferric Chromide is...
Commonly used as an etchant for copper based alloys. i.e. printed circuit boards, and those nifty etched brass parts we use on our models.

Arved Grass
Fleming Island, Florida


Dave Parker
 

Sorry, there is no such thing as ferric chromide (or even a chromide ligand for that matter).

Ferric chloride enjoys a rich tradition in metal etching, originally for artwork and more recently for things like PCBs.  It is often supplied and shipped in liquid form, thus its relevance to tank cars.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Larry Buell
 

I worked for Dowell from June, 1973 until April, 1976, before I went to work for the Santa Fe Ry.  The full name of the company was Dowell Division of Dow Chemical.  The headquarters was in Midland, MI at that time.  Dowell was later taken over by Slumberger, a French-American joint venture, IIRC, in the oil patch.  Dowell got its start after Dow management realized the potential for improving the output of oil/gas wells after acidizing some of Dow’s brine wells and noting the output improvements.


hubert mask
 

Larry Buell please contact me of list 

Hubert Mask 


On Nov 22, 2014, at 7:53 PM, "'Larry Buell' lbuell@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I worked for Dowell from June, 1973 until April, 1976, before I went to work for the Santa Fe Ry.  The full name of the company was Dowell Division of Dow Chemical.  The headquarters was in Midland, MI at that time.  Dowell was later taken over by Slumberger, a French-American joint venture, IIRC, in the oil patch.  Dowell got its start after Dow management realized the potential for improving the output of oil/gas wells after acidizing some of Dow’s brine wells and noting the output improvements.