CN&L 2500 series s/s boxcar width


Benjamin Scanlon
 

Hi all

I think the series ran from 2500-2524. I am trying to establish the overall width of these cars which were similar in some respects to USRA s/s cars, but had rather different pattern bracing and 7/8 Murphy ends. Thanks to Rob K, we now have some appropriate ends in TT.

Regards

Ben Scanlon
London


Eric Lombard
 

Ben, if no one can come up with an equipment diagram or drawing with definitive dimensions you might consider the following.

ACL 49700-50199, and C&WC 8596-8695, class O-16, were built by TCI in 1925  (a known stencil date of 6-1925) as was CN&L 2500-2524 (a known stencil date of 7-1925). Pho,tos of all these cars show the same construction detail. On single-sheathed cars, the outer surface of the wood sheathing is in the same plane as the outer surface of the side sill. See:
http://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/c-n-and-l-columbia-newberry-and-laurens-box-car-2501;rad

The O-16 cars were rebuilt with steel sheathing to classes O-16-A through F. Equipment diagrams for these rebuilt cars indicate a dimension of 8'-8 1/2" over the (presumably original) side sills.

If one is comfortable with the logic train here then the base plane width of the CN&L cars is 8'-8 1/2" to which, on each side, the posts and braces, door, ladders, and grabs would be added.

Eric L
Homewood, IL

Photos

On Mon, Dec 22, 2014 at 1:35 AM, benjaminscanlon@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi all

I think the series ran from 2500-2524. I am trying to establish the overall width of these cars which were similar in some respects to USRA s/s cars, but had rather different pattern bracing and 7/8 Murphy ends. Thanks to Rob K, we now have some appropriate ends in TT.

Regards

Ben Scanlon
London



Bill Welch
 

I have a photo of 2530 in my collection so it must have been a larger group although I have not checked my ORER. I would argue that the cars are more derivative of the CN cars built circa 1916 from which the USRA 50-ton car was arguably derived.  CN&L cars were 6-inches shorter than USRA cars.

Bill Welch


Benjamin Scanlon
 

Thanks Bill and Eric


Bill, yes, I  believe modellers have used the Accurail version of that car as a stand-in for the CN&L car.  I'm wondering what you think the width of the car would be if it conformed more to the 1916 Canadian car design. Mr Hendrickson's article in the Feb 1993 RMJ mentioned inside widths of 9' and 8'6" so I suppose I might conclude that an outer width of 8'9" is reasonable?


Regards,


Ben Scanlon

London


Dennis Storzek
 

Sounds too narrow to me for cars built that late.. USRA single sheathed cars were 8'-9" wide over the sills, and 9'-4" over the eaves. The double sheathed cars were onlt 8'-6" wide over the sills, but the wall system was thicker and were 9'-3 1/4" over the siding. Both were 8'-6" wide inside. Other cars of the era were similar.

Ben, you keep talking about designing patterns for cars in TT scale, but you don't have squat for reference material. At least buy the 1922 Car Builder'[s Cyclopedia reprint available on CD from Rail Driver.

RailDriver | Historic Cyclopedias

 


It will give you a lot of background if nothing else.

Dennis Storzek


Benjamin Scanlon
 

I've been sent an ORER page indicating that the CN&L 2500-2524 and the later series 2525-2549 (which 2530 was part of) were 8'6" IH by 8'6" inner width ... so I'm assuming the outside width of the cars was probably more like 8'8 1/2" over the sheathing.  Same ORER gives a overall width over eaves of 9'3 1/2" which sounds sufficient for the bracing etc.   


Thanks to all


Ben Scanlon

London


Benjamin Scanlon
 

I will buy that Cyclopedia, Dennis.  I was not aware of it, and you may not believe it but that's the first time any one has suggested it.


Ben Scanlon

London


Benjamin Scanlon
 

It's been noted on here that photos of CN&L  2500-2524 and 2525-2549 series don't show evidence of a Hutchins roof, ie, the lack of prominent ribs. 

 

I'm wondering if anyone has a view as to what roof these cars would have had. Not a radial type, I think but beyond that I do not know and the photos don't give much away.

 

Regards,

 

Ben Scanlon

London, England


David
 

Focus on Freight Cars Vol.1 has two mid-30s photos of ACL O-16 48558, which has what appears to be a flat metal roof with no visible seam caps (which means they're inside the roof sheets).

David Thompson