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prototype for MDC truss-rod caboose?


D. Scott Chatfield
 

Is there a prototype for MDC/Roundhouse's 30-odd foot truss-rod wood caboose?
I've got one here that has a cupola whose roof has a bell-curve shape, which
I've seen on their drovers caboose, but not on this 3-window cab. Perhaps
the original owner swapped cupolas? Anyhow, it has a slightly NYC look, but
I wonder if there was a better match.

This is the caboose with the double-sheathed sides, not the single-sheathed
truss-sided version. Here's an example with the regular cupola:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Roundhouse-MDC-HO-Chicago-North-Western-Old-Time-Caboose-Kit-NIB-/281557124238?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item418e1cc48e


Here's a drover caboose with the funky cupola that my model has:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Roundhouse-MDC-HO-John-Allen-Tribute-G-D-Old-Time-Dovers-Caboose-Upgraded-Exc-/271734056486?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item3f449ca626


My thinking if it is close to a New York Central caboose a friend's railroad
can use it, since NYC steam-era cabooses are hard to come by. I know that
many NYC cabooses had very low cupolas.

Thanks
Scott Chatfield


Adrian Hundhausen
 

Scott,

The MDC caboose is a model of a Colorado Midland way car, built 1886 based on an AT&SF design from the early 1880s, but with wider side doors installed ca. 1890. The CM only had one car with those exact doors; the others had double rather than triple windows. The kit came with that cupola roof. That style of roof was relatively common and was usually referred to as a Bombay roof.

Adrian Hundhausen


---In STMFC@..., <blindog@...> wrote :

Is there a prototype for MDC/Roundhouse's 30-odd foot truss-rod wood caboose?
I've got one here that has a cupola whose roof has a bell-curve shape, which
I've seen on their drovers caboose, but not on this 3-window cab. Perhaps
the original owner swapped cupolas? Anyhow, it has a slightly NYC look, but
I wonder if there was a better match.

This is the caboose with the double-sheathed sides, not the single-sheathed
truss-sided version. Here's an example with the regular cupola:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Roundhouse-MDC-HO-Chicago-North-Western-Old-Time-Caboose-Kit-NIB-/281557124238?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item418e1cc48e


Here's a drover caboose with the funky cupola that my model has:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Roundhouse-MDC-HO-John-Allen-Tribute-G-D-Old-Time-Dovers-Caboose-Upgraded-Exc-/271734056486?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item3f449ca626


My thinking if it is close to a New York Central caboose a friend's railroad
can use it, since NYC steam-era cabooses are hard to come by. I know that
many NYC cabooses had very low cupolas.

Thanks
Scott Chatfield


Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Scott,

The MDC three-window caboose is fairly close to a common design built for/by the Gould-owned railroads: D&RG, WP, MP and possibly others. Many of these were sold off to shortlines including California's Sacramento Northern, Tidewater Southern, and Central California Traction Co.

The body casting is fairly close to photos in my collection, and to plans in the Gregg TRAINSHED CYCLOPEDIAS.  That said, the underframe/floor rides way too high (or the body rides too high on the underframe) throwing off the car's proportions, to clear the truck centers are set too far from the ends, the end platforms should be full width with tender-type steps, the cupola is too narrow for most prototype examples (but not all), and the detail parts are pretty crude. For most of the Gould-era cars, or their successors built to this design, the round roof casting and the standard cupola with the simple arched roof are the closest to prototype.

As has been pointed out, the "Bombay" cupola is similar to a CM car, and IIRC the Wabash had cars with this type of cupola.

I have two of these cars from the bad old days before we knew better, and a couple more in my unbuilt pile (I used to model the WP and SN). Someday I may build new underframes for these and see if I can get closer to the prototype. Finding the proper step castings was always the problem. I also shortened one into a Pere Marquette prototype when I did Nickle Plate. Now it is lettered for my Virginia Midland.

You can read about the SN cars purchased from the WP at http://www.wplives.org/sn/caboose.html . There are two photos of these cars in the "Post-merger section".

And by the way, these cabooses were NEVER known "Gould standard" cars. Unlike "Harriman standard", there is no corresponding term for the Gould common designs. I coined this term many years ago and used it in correspondence. Somehow it caught on and been used in various otherwise reputable books (Jim Eager's WP Color Guide page 120, for example). Inventing this term is not one of my prouder moments.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 1/10/15 7:33 PM, blindog@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Is there a prototype for MDC/Roundhouse's 30-odd foot truss-rod wood caboose?
I've got one here that has a cupola whose roof has a bell-curve shape, which
I've seen on their drovers caboose, but not on this 3-window cab. Perhaps
the original owner swapped cupolas? Anyhow, it has a slightly NYC look, but
I wonder if there was a better match.

This is the caboose with the double-sheathed sides, not the single-sheathed
truss-sided version. Here's an example with the regular cupola:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Roundhouse-MDC-HO-Chicago-North-Western-Old-Time-Caboose-Kit-NIB-/281557124238?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item418e1cc48e

Here's a drover caboose with the funky cupola that my model has:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Roundhouse-MDC-HO-John-Allen-Tribute-G-D-Old-Time-Dovers-Caboose-Upgraded-Exc-/271734056486?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item3f449ca626

My thinking if it is close to a New York Central caboose a friend's railroad
can use it, since NYC steam-era cabooses are hard to come by. I know that
many NYC cabooses had very low cupolas.

Thanks
Scott Chatfield



 

Scott – The bell curve roof, combined with the MDC old timer caboose kit makes a very good approximation of the standard Wabash caboose.  That was the standard caboose on my layout, utilizing the Red Ball cupola. – Al Westerfield
 

Sent: Saturday, January 10, 2015 7:16 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: prototype for MDC truss-rod caboose?
 
 

Scott,

The MDC caboose is a model of a Colorado Midland way car, built 1886 based on an AT&SF design from the early 1880s, but with wider side doors installed ca. 1890. The CM only had one car with those exact doors; the others had double rather than triple windows. The kit came with that cupola roof. That style of roof was relatively common and was usually referred to as a Bombay roof.

Adrian Hundhausen



---In STMFC@..., wrote :

Is there a prototype for MDC/Roundhouse's 30-odd foot truss-rod wood caboose?
I've got one here that has a cupola whose roof has a bell-curve shape, which
I've seen on their drovers caboose, but not on this 3-window cab. Perhaps
the original owner swapped cupolas? Anyhow, it has a slightly NYC look, but
I wonder if there was a better match.

This is the caboose with the double-sheathed sides, not the single-sheathed
truss-sided version. Here's an example with the regular cupola:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Roundhouse-MDC-HO-Chicago-North-Western-Old-Time-Caboose-Kit-NIB-/281557124238?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item418e1cc48e


Here's a drover caboose with the funky cupola that my model has:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Roundhouse-MDC-HO-John-Allen-Tribute-G-D-Old-Time-Dovers-Caboose-Upgraded-Exc-/271734056486?pt=Model_RR_Trains&hash=item3f449ca626


My thinking if it is close to a New York Central caboose a friend's railroad
can use it, since NYC steam-era cabooses are hard to come by. I know that
many NYC cabooses had very low cupolas.

Thanks
Scott Chatfield


Charlie Vlk
 

Scott-

The MDC / Roundhouse / Athearn HO double sheathed caboose is loosely based on the Colorado Midland waycar, for which drawings were published in Model Railroader.

It was chosen because it could share tooling with the MDC Overland passenger cars which were based on Sierra Railroad prototypes.  Side door and single sheathed variations were also tooled at the same time.

The car was a pretty good choice as it was very similar to what was a near-standard car from the 1880s – 1900s as built….the AT&SF and CB&Q among the major western roads that had 30’ bodied cars of similar architecture.

The big problem with the car is that Clarence Menteer (sp?) owner and toolmaker of MDC decided to lower the windows so that the roadname could be printed above them which made the car unlike most anything on the railroads.

The N Scale car is most probably a D&RGW prototype picked for the same reasons with pretty much the same artistic license liberties taken and also shares underframe and body tooling with the N Scale shorty passenger cars.

Charlie Vlk

TT


Tom Vanwormer
 

Folks,
Actually the way car in question was a scheduled model developed by the St. Charles Car Co and cataloged by them.  The Wabash and other Mid Western roads also used the design.
Tom Van Wormer
Monument CO

'Charlie Vlk' cvlk@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Scott-

The MDC / Roundhouse / Athearn HO double sheathed caboose is loosely based on the Colorado Midland waycar, for which drawings were published in Model Railroader.

It was chosen because it could share tooling with the MDC Overland passenger cars which were based on Sierra Railroad prototypes.  Side door and single sheathed variations were also tooled at the same time.

The car was a pretty good choice as it was very similar to what was a near-standard car from the 1880s – 1900s as built….the AT&SF and CB&Q among the major western roads that had 30’ bodied cars of similar architecture.

The big problem with the car is that Clarence Menteer (sp?) owner and toolmaker of MDC decided to lower the windows so that the roadname could be printed above them which made the car unlike most anything on the railroads.

The N Scale car is most probably a D&RGW prototype picked for the same reasons with pretty much the same artistic license liberties taken and also shares underframe and body tooling with the N Scale shorty passenger cars.

Charlie Vlk

TT