Car Weights


Todd Horton
 

I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided cars?  I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this.  I’ve used 5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.

 

Todd Horton

 

 

 

 


Dennis Williams
 

16 pennies weight about the same as the two nuts do. 
Dennis Williams/Owner


On Friday, January 16, 2015 10:22 PM, "'Todd Horton' toddchorton@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided cars?  I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this.  I’ve used 5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.
 
Todd Horton
 
 
 
 



A&Y Dave in MD
 

Sheet lead from chimney flashing is one I use. Cut to size with scissors or shears (if you have them). Try not to sand it or letting kids play with it as lead accumulates in the body and can lead to developmental problems for kids if absorbed/ingested in sufficient quantities by them. But it should be safe in most weighting applications. Tire balancing weights are harder to find, but another option.

A final option I have used is pennies, although newer ones are getting lighter and not as cost effective.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Jan 16, 2015, at 10:21 PM, 'Todd Horton' toddchorton@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided cars?  I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this.  I’ve used 5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.

 

Todd Horton

 

 

 

 


NHJJ4@...
 

  Todd,
 
 I use the stick on wheel wt. Can buy a big box from the likes of Pep Boys. I use the 1/4 oz section. Each stick is 3 oz and there are 48 in a box. That is a lot less than the name brand hi priced spread.
 Last box I got I think was $10.00 maybe a bit more.
 
 Jim Evans
 

In a message dated 1/16/2015 7:22:26 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided cars?  I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this.  I’ve used 5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.

Todd Horton


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Todd,



I use tire weights for house cars except stock cars. They come in strips of
0.25 oz. self-adhesive lead weights, and they're readily available at auto
parts stores. You break off the number of weights you need for a car, peel
off the backing and stick them to the floor. I've never had one come loose.
For stock cars, I use sheet lead, cut to fit the car, and glued to the floor
with a liberal amount of medium viscosity cyanoacrylate. Sheet lead is
available in various thicknesses by the foot, and I buy the minimum web
order amount, usually 3 or 4 sq. ft. at a time from Rotometals. The cost of
sheet lead is about 35 cents per car, depending upon the thickness you use
(1/16, 3/32, or 1/8 in.). Sheet lead is also useful for hoppers and
gondolas. I use lead shot in the center sill space for flat cars.



Nelson Moyer







From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2015 9:21 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Car Weights





I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided
cars? I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this. I've used
5/8" nuts as weights but those aren't cheap. If this has been discussed in
the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.



Todd Horton


Schuyler Larrabee
 

I use wheel weights, from auto shops, though I bought mine on Amazon. They
are rectangular in cross section, about 3/32” thick by ½” x 5/8” for ¼ oz.,
and are presented on double-sticky foam tape. The sticky is REALLY sticky.
Get it on in the right place the first time.



Cheap thrills. I got enough to last me a LONG time.



Schuyler



Subject: [STMFC] Car Weights

I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided
cars? I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this. I’ve used
5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in
the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.



Todd Horton













[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Andy Harman
 

At 10:21 PM 1/16/2015 -0500, you wrote:
I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided cars? I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this. I ve used 5/8 nuts as weights but those aren t cheap. If this has been discussed in the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.
I ordered a big roll of sheet lead from McMaster-Carr back about 10 years ago, cost me about $70 including shipping. Can cut it with scissors, form it to shape, stack it and glue it with cyanopoxy and use it about anywhere. Sure beats shot. The big steel nuts are ok providing they don't break loose - super glue isn't so super where steel is involved.

Andy


Andy Harman
 

At 10:41 PM 1/16/2015 -0500, you wrote:
Sheet lead from chimney flashing is one I use.
This must be a western thing. I found zero lead flashing around Cincinnati. One kid I asked at an 84 lumber store, asked for lead flashing and he said "Uh, do you mean metal?" I said yes, lead is a metal. He showed me some galvanized.... for whatever reason, lead is just not used around here in roofing and plain sheet isn't readily available. Lowes had some chimney cone shaped things, but they cost way more than I wanted to pay for the actual amount of lead they contained. Someone suggested McMaster-Carr and I bought what has so far been a lifetime supply. It beats tire weights, or marked up 10x tire weights, and all the other blob and pellet shaped things. It's 1/16" sheet and I can cut it to whatever shapes I need. The scraps all go in a box and get used here and there to fill in spaces.

Andy


Tony Thompson
 

Andy Harman wrote:

 

The big steel nuts are ok providing they don't  break loose - super glue isn't so super where steel is involved.


     I use canopy glue for this and have never had one break loose, even one case where the car catapulted to the floor. I agree I would not use CA for this.


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Jim Betz
 

Hi,

� I've used lead sheet, lead shot, car weights (lead), nuts (steel),
pennies ... just about anything that is 'heavy'.� If I have to shape
or cut the weight - I use lead because it is fast and easy.� If what
I'm using fits the space ... then I'll use just about anything that
is heavy.� If you use depleted uranium it can recharge the
luminescence of the numbers on your watch.

� If I need 'cut to fit' I use sheet lead.� When doing the underside
of a flat car I put a layer of lead shot 'where ever it will fit'.� When
adding weight to a leading/trailing truck I cut small pieces of
sheet lead and glue it to the underside.� When doing hoppers
that have a load I add the weight before the load.
� Lead also has the advantage that it can be drilled, cut with
scissors or a hobby knife, etc.� I don't ever file it (fills up the
file immediately) ... but you can scrape it with the back side
of your hobby knife and 'wear it down' as needed.

� My most common adhesive for all weight jobs is "some form
of white glue" (Elmers, Elmers Carpenter, Krystal Klear).� I
wouldn't use CA/acc for this work ... ever.� First its too
expensive and second I hate it and avoid it at all costs.
(Yes, there are some jobs where CA is required.)

� One of the great advantages of the white glues is that
they can be softened with a few drops of water - just in
case you need to rework.
������������������������������������������������������������������������������ - YMMV ... Jim


mopacfirst
 

Probably too much verbiage for something like car weights, but here goes anyway.

Twenty-ish years ago I stopped at a neighborhood hardware store that was going out of business, and picked up a roll of lead flashing.  The guy who was selling off stuff offered it to me for $5.  If I live to be 200 I probably won't run out of this stuff.  I keep it in the paper bag I brought it home from the store in, and I have a pair of yellow-handle tinsnips that's more or less dedicated to cutting it.  Yellow-handle means the part you're cutting and the part that you're cutting from both get bent, which is pretty unimportant with lead.

But for house cars, I prefer fishing weights.  I can buy these at Academy here in Texas, but I have some packages that I bought from Cabela's (midwest).  I use two 1/2 ounce or four 1/4 oz for a typical car, and I use a scale.  The Branchline 50' cars came with two 5/8" nuts, I think, and those are fine, but the 40' cars came with maybe 1/2" nuts and those are not enough.  I was surprised when I realized this, but the scale proved it.  So I add two of the 1/4 oz weights, gluing them next to or on top of the steel weights.  I don't think center of gravity is that huge a deal on HO freight cars.

The glue?  Zap-a-dap or Shoe Goo, which are clear and kind of stringy, but will not turn loose.  I  can get one off, as I did once when I had already glued the weights into a car that I decided wasn't correct enough (body style and paint scheme didn't match) and it took water pump pliers to break the weights free.  Don't ask why I bothered to try to re-use the weights.

Ron Merrick


Craig Zeni
 

On Jan 17, 2015, at 3:19 AM, STMFC@yahoogroups.com wrote:

2a. Re: Car Weights
Posted by: "Tony Thompson" tony@signaturepress.com sigpress
Date: Fri Jan 16, 2015 11:49 pm ((PST))

Andy Harman wrote:

The big steel nuts are ok providing they don't break loose - super glue isn't so super where steel is involved.
I use canopy glue for this and have never had one break loose, even one case where the car catapulted to the floor. I agree I would not use CA for this.


Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history
Being the eternal skeptic on this, I try to build my cars with removable floors. Typically I'll put a car-interior-width strip of 1/4" square styrene across the inside end of the car and use coupler mounting screws long enough to screw into said styrene. I've been securing the weights with RTV silicone for the past few years with good success.

Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Schleigh Mike
 

STMFC Model Railroaders----

My closed-car weights are made from 1/8 x 1/2 brass bar I purchase from McMaster-Carr; not necessarily an economical approach but, for me, an appealing one.  The bar is cut to the full length of the available interior space.  The weight is attached usually with two 0-80 stainless screws passing from below through the center sill.  Tapped holes for couplers, trucks, and shelf retention are all placed in this bar.  It provides an assured stability for the straightness of the floor, comforting for some resin models.  The added weight is about right (0.462 ounces per inch).  These weights are also placed inside tank cars typically on 'edge.'

I went to the brass after being annoyed by having to paint the steel car weights on Athearn and other 'blue-boxers.'  My approach takes extra time but I very much like it.  I have also used lead sheet (also from McM-C) for flats and gons and like that as well.  It has occurred to me that lead could be scribed to represent floor boards for these open top cars but I have not done that yet.  I would have to post guards to watch for EPA and local DEP big-brothers.

Happy Model Railroading!    Mike Schleigh




On Saturday, January 17, 2015 8:33 AM, "Craig Zeni clzeni@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 

On Jan 17, 2015, at 3:19 AM, STMFC@... wrote:

> 2a. Re: Car Weights
> Posted by: "Tony Thompson" tony@... sigpress
> Date: Fri Jan 16, 2015 11:49 pm ((PST))
>
> Andy Harman wrote:
>
>> The big steel nuts are ok providing they don't break loose - super glue isn't so super where steel is involved.
>>
>
> I use canopy glue for this and have never had one break loose, even one case where the car catapulted to the floor. I agree I would not use CA for this.
>
>
> Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
> 2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
> (510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
> Publishers of books on railroad history

Being the eternal skeptic on this, I try to build my cars with removable floors. Typically I'll put a car-interior-width strip of 1/4" square styrene across the inside end of the car and use coupler mounting screws long enough to screw into said styrene. I've been securing the weights with RTV silicone for the past few years with good success.

Craig Zeni
Cary NC




Andy Sperandeo
 

I like sheet lead attached to the car floor with small machine screws. Screw holes on the center line are generally hidden by or in the car's center sill. Screw attachment is fast, reliable, and doesn't leak fumes. – Andy


asychis@...
 

Jim,
 
White or yellow glue for to a plastic to metal or metal to metal bond? That seems unusual to me.  I would think a steel nut glued to a plastic body with white glue would easily pop off. Are you using a thin layer of glue or encasing the weight?
 
Jerry Michels
 
 
"My most common adhesive for all weight jobs is "some form
of white glue" (Elmers, Elmers Carpenter, Krystal Klear)."
 


markstation01 <markstation01@...>
 

I like the lead sheet use as well, I have also bought weights too, I know it sounds ridiculous and people get very emotional about this stuff. Check train shows for bargains, maybe even ask your local hobby shop if they can give you a better price if you buy several packages at one time.


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Andy Sperandeo asperandeo@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date:01/17/2015 10:39 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Car Weights

 

I like sheet lead attached to the car floor with small machine screws. Screw holes on the center line are generally hidden by or in the car's center sill. Screw attachment is fast, reliable, and doesn't leak fumes. – Andy


markstation01 <markstation01@...>
 

I use Loctite white contact cement myself


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "asychis@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date:01/17/2015 10:51 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Car Weights

 

Jim,
 
White or yellow glue for to a plastic to metal or metal to metal bond? That seems unusual to me.  I would think a steel nut glued to a plastic body with white glue would easily pop off. Are you using a thin layer of glue or encasing the weight?
 
Jerry Michels
 
 
"My most common adhesive for all weight jobs is "some form
of white glue" (Elmers, Elmers Carpenter, Krystal Klear)."
 


A&Y Dave in MD
 

Got mine in New Hampshire at a building supply, not big box store. They stocked it for chimney pros. Not much retail market for DIY!

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Jan 17, 2015, at 2:33 AM, Andy Harman gsgondola@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

At 10:41 PM 1/16/2015 -0500, you wrote:
>Sheet lead from chimney flashing is one I use.

This must be a western thing. I found zero lead flashing around
Cincinnati. One kid I asked at an 84 lumber store, asked for lead flashing
and he said "Uh, do you mean metal?" I said yes, lead is a metal. He
showed me some galvanized.... for whatever reason, lead is just not used
around here in roofing and plain sheet isn't readily available. Lowes had
some chimney cone shaped things, but they cost way more than I wanted to
pay for the actual amount of lead they contained. Someone suggested
McMaster-Carr and I bought what has so far been a lifetime supply. It
beats tire weights, or marked up 10x tire weights, and all the other blob
and pellet shaped things. It's 1/16" sheet and I can cut it to whatever
shapes I need. The scraps all go in a box and get used here and there to
fill in spaces.

Andy


Tony Thompson
 

White or yellow glue for to a plastic to metal or metal to metal bond? That seems unusual to me.  I would think a steel nut glued to a plastic body with white glue would easily pop off. Are you using a thin layer of glue or encasing the weight?
 

   I don't know what Jim Betz meant by "white or yellow glue," but canopy cement is NOT "white glue" even though it is white in color and can be thinned with water.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Walter Cox
 

I have a few Branchline 40 foot box cars to build and was wondering about using good old Walthers goo. Has anyone had any experience with it
 Walt
 

In a message dated 1/17/2015 10:58:04 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

I use Loctite white contact cement myself


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "asychis@... [STMFC]"
Date:01/17/2015 10:51 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Car Weights

 

Jim,
 
White or yellow glue for to a plastic to metal or metal to metal bond? That seems unusual to me.  I would think a steel nut glued to a plastic body with white glue would easily pop off. Are you using a thin layer of glue or encasing the weight?
 
Jerry Michels
 
 
"My most common adhesive for all weight jobs is "some form
of white glue" (Elmers, Elmers Carpenter, Krystal Klear)."