e bay chuckle


ed_mines
 

Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.


The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.


Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 


How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.


Ed Mines


Jeff Pellas <jppellas@...>
 

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 

Jeff
jppellas@...


-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Bill Welch
 

FYI the Wabash DD SS cars had Radial roofs.

I think it would be very interesting to have an Album dedicated to photos of wood models as a part of this Yahoo discussion group.

Bill Welch


Mikebrock
 

Bill Welch writes:

"I think it would be very interesting to have an Album dedicated to photos of wood models as a part of this Yahoo discussion group."

I have to say that one of the best wood models that I have seen is the Quality Craft UP CA-1 caboose. UP modelers have been blessed with quite a few nice renditions of CA-1 cabooses and the old Quality Craft hangs in pretty well with its various brass competitors.

I have to also say that I have a soft spot [ in my brain? ] for the old Silver Streak DS box car [ USRA?], particularly the Frisco version with Frisco Fast Freight emblazoned on its side...although I believe I determined that such a logo never appeared on the car.

Mike Brock...what hapened? Is it 1953 again?


Andy Harman
 

In the 1970s Quality Craft made a PRR 50' auto box car with end doors.  A local guy built one up and had it on display at the LHS.  It did the job, I bought the kit and some scalecoat sanding sealer.  I really gave it the old college try, but I was never satisfied with the prepping of the wood.  It had cast ends so I did'nt have to worry about that.

I never got any farther with it... Today I would use the cast parts and build the rest with styrene shapes.  How do you surface sand a piece of spaghetti wood?  My answer is... I don't.  Fortunately I didn't mangle the kit to where I Couldn't sell it.  

Also attempted a QC well flat car that had cast end beams and you had to shape the sides around them... And to represent a welded stiffener they gave you a piece of cardstock.  I got farther with that one but eventually parked and ebayed it 25 years later.

Wood is like shooting film when you've got a nice digital camera.  Except I will still shoot film for fun.  I will work with wood if it's for furniture, benchwork, or other 1:1 utility.  But for models plastic is king.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 6:04 PM, "Jeff Pellas jppellas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 



-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Andy Harman
 

I just remembered... I have an AMB Laserkit of an N&W CF caboose.  This is one I have attempted three times to build from a QC kit- twice in HO scale and once in O scale.  All failed.

Thing is, I will be modeling a CF as rebuilt with plywood sides.  Not sure if I can reverse the sides so the smooth side is out, or just make them from styrene.

I also have a brass CF... NJI I think, never painted it.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 6:04 PM, "Jeff Pellas jppellas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 



-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Douglas Harding
 

Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Bruce Smith
 

The Q1 2015 edition of the NYC Modeler has an article by Seth Larkin on building some AMB kits and he converted one to a plywood sided car with Squadron white putty to fill in the grooves.  It seemed to work fairly nicely.  I suppose that you could also contact AMB to see if they would cut plywood sides for you...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 10:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org




A&Y Dave in MD
 

Sides are not reversible due to 'toilet' window. Also not sure whether peel and stick details would work with wall inside out. Aren't there plastic versions of plywood side CF?

Fortunately I need the as is CF for the  two the A&Y purchased. I have a partially built AMB and a painted brass version. Then I moved the date for my layout back 7 years before the cabs were used on the A&Y. 

I have a QC cab kitbashed by a friend to represent the ex-RF&P cab used in the 30s along with rented Southern woodies for A&Y.  The QC metal castings worked well, but even for usual sick built wood sides my friend substituted styrene.

I have some vent box wood cars I purchased built at a flea market, but I also prefer to build in styrene. I like uniform density and fracture properties. I don't like having to 'commune' with materials to know how they warp, cut or fracture!

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Jan 29, 2015, at 10:36 PM, Andy Harman gsgondola@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I just remembered... I have an AMB Laserkit of an N&W CF caboose.  This is one I have attempted three times to build from a QC kit- twice in HO scale and once in O scale.  All failed.

Thing is, I will be modeling a CF as rebuilt with plywood sides.  Not sure if I can reverse the sides so the smooth side is out, or just make them from styrene.

I also have a brass CF... NJI I think, never painted it.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 6:04 PM, "Jeff Pellas jppellas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 



-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Andy Harman
 

The only N&W caboose available in plastic is the P2K northeast.  In spite of the variety that's the only one that can be correct out if the box.  Atlas makes a good stand-in for the C31 that is easily fixed, and an ok stand-in for the C8/C9 that can't be fixed.  The N&W "family"
Cabooses - CF, CG, CH, C30, C30A - not in plastic but OMI has done them.

IIRC BLI announced a CF around the time they released the H2 hoppers and Y6B but it never materialized.  I have the brass CH and C30A.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 30, 2015, at 9:29 AM, "David Bott dbott@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Sides are not reversible due to 'toilet' window. Also not sure whether peel and stick details would work with wall inside out. Aren't there plastic versions of plywood side CF?

Fortunately I need the as is CF for the  two the A&Y purchased. I have a partially built AMB and a painted brass version. Then I moved the date for my layout back 7 years before the cabs were used on the A&Y. 

I have a QC cab kitbashed by a friend to represent the ex-RF&P cab used in the 30s along with rented Southern woodies for A&Y.  The QC metal castings worked well, but even for usual sick built wood sides my friend substituted styrene.

I have some vent box wood cars I purchased built at a flea market, but I also prefer to build in styrene. I like uniform density and fracture properties. I don't like having to 'commune' with materials to know how they warp, cut or fracture!

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Jan 29, 2015, at 10:36 PM, Andy Harman gsgondola@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I just remembered... I have an AMB Laserkit of an N&W CF caboose.  This is one I have attempted three times to build from a QC kit- twice in HO scale and once in O scale.  All failed.

Thing is, I will be modeling a CF as rebuilt with plywood sides.  Not sure if I can reverse the sides so the smooth side is out, or just make them from styrene.

I also have a brass CF... NJI I think, never painted it.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 6:04 PM, "Jeff Pellas jppellas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 



-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Andy Harman
 

Yeah styrene will be the answer.  I may cut other parts in plastic as well, depends on what I find.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 11:35 PM, "'Douglas Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Andy Harman
 

I never really thought about just filling in the grooves.  

I still can't believe anyone still uses Squadron.

I think I'm going to pull out the kit and start troweling some Cypox on the sides.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 11:49 PM, "'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

The Q1 2015 edition of the NYC Modeler has an article by Seth Larkin on building some AMB kits and he converted one to a plywood sided car with Squadron white putty to fill in the grooves.  It seemed to work fairly nicely.  I suppose that you could also contact AMB to see if they would cut plywood sides for you...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 10:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org




Doug Pillow
 

Have built two of the  Quality craft wood CF N&W cabooses over the years. Very accurate with the correct underframe. AMB kit has Athearn caboose under frame, I plan on replacing it with stryene when I build it.
 
                                                                                                                                Doug Pillow


Jeff Pellas <jppellas@...>
 

Bill,

     The first change to the kit I made was scratch building a radial roof for it. I walk a line between being true to the kit and depicting the car as accurately as possible and in this case, the car had to have a radial roof! I built up the roof with thin strips of balsa and sanded a curved roof shape for it. I then glued a very thin layer of aluminum (from a soda can) over the wood before applying the metal ribs. For the underside details, I used frame pieces salvaged from a Silver Streak USRA DS car combined with Tichy bolsters. I did use the turned wood brake cylinder that came with the kit (with modifications). For the 3-3-3 ends, I decided not to use the card stock ones and instead cut them off of a 1970s era Tyco boxcar. Had to sand and file off the cast on ladder and brake parts. I then put aside the ladder stock from the kit and instead fashioned the end ladders out of styrene and Ye Olde Huff n Puff grab irons. For the sides, I first added styrene strip for the side braces (to make the braces stand out more). I then cut out, from the cardboard sides, the spaces between the embossed braces and glued them to the car between the styrene braces I had just applied. I also cut out the doors individually, added very thin wood strip behind the doors (also to make them stand out more) and glued those to the sides. That is where I am now. Still have to add grabs and a few other details to the sides and carefully paint them and touch up several other areas. 
     If I had to do this over again, I'd still probably use the Tyco ends since I can't seem to find 3-3-3 ends as a separate detail part. Also I'd use end ladders from Yarmouth, a Central Valley radial roof and an Accurail bottom.
     The GTW car I am going to build is very similar to the Wabash car except it has auto end doors and also ladders on the sides instead of drop grabs.

     I'd definitely contribute pics to a photo section on vintage kit cars.                  

Jeff
jppellas@...


-----Original Message-----
From: fgexbill@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 6:58 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



FYI the Wabash DD SS cars had Radial roofs.

I think it would be very interesting to have an Album dedicated to photos of wood models as a part of this Yahoo discussion group.

Bill Welch