MTH Paint Remover


Layout Tour
 

Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I’ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.

 

Chuck Davis

Norfolk VA


Tim O'Connor
 

Chuck

Tried acetone or MEK? I mention this because the old Front Range cars
were extremely hard to strip, except with Accupaint thinner, which is
around 75% acetone + MEK. (Fred Becker is the person who found the paint
in the first place, and told George Bishop who quickly switched his AP
brand to that type of paint. AP was originally a complete different paint.)

Tim O'



At 1/30/2015 10:12 PM Friday, you wrote:

Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I�ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.
 
Chuck Davis
Norfolk VA


Steve SANDIFER
 

Won't MEK dissolve the car? I use it as my solvent for plastic kits.

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ

Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 10:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] MTH Paint Remover

 

 

Chuck

Tried acetone or MEK? I mention this because the old Front Range cars
were extremely hard to strip, except with Accupaint thinner, which is
around 75% acetone + MEK. (Fred Becker is the person who found the paint
in the first place, and told George Bishop who quickly switched his AP
brand to that type of paint. AP was originally a complete different paint.)

Tim O'



At 1/30/2015 10:12 PM Friday, you wrote:

Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I’ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.
 
Chuck Davis
Norfolk VA


Tim O'Connor
 


Evidently not, since it's a major component of Accupaint, TruColor etc.
I didn't soak the Front Range bodies for long -- just a few seconds in
the bath and the paint sloughed off. Because it's so volatile it will
evaporate almost immediately from the car when the car is removed from
the bath. I think that if you allow them to soak or leave a puddle on the
car, that could damage the plastic. Also I only stripped the car body,
not fine ladders, etc.


At 1/30/2015 11:30 PM Friday, you wrote:


Won't MEK dissolve the car? I use it as my solvent for plastic kits.
 
__________________________________________________
J. Stephen Sandifer
Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ
Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society
 
From: STMFC@... [ mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 10:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] MTH Paint Remover
 
 

Chuck

Tried acetone or MEK? I mention this because the old Front Range cars
were extremely hard to strip, except with Accupaint thinner, which is
around 75% acetone + MEK. (Fred Becker is the person who found the paint
in the first place, and told George Bishop who quickly switched his AP
brand to that type of paint. AP was originally a complete different paint.)

Tim O'



At 1/30/2015 10:12 PM Friday, you wrote:
Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I�ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.
 
Chuck Davis
Norfolk VA




Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Would acetone/lacquer thinner/fingernail polish remover be safe? I use this to strip paint from fiberglass (on archery bows), but I'm not sure of its effect on styrene.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 1/30/15 11:39 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
 


Evidently not, since it's a major component of Accupaint, TruColor etc.
I didn't soak the Front Range bodies for long -- just a few seconds in
the bath and the paint sloughed off. Because it's so volatile it will
evaporate almost immediately from the car when the car is removed from
the bath. I think that if you allow them to soak or leave a puddle on the
car, that could damage the plastic. Also I only stripped the car body,
not fine ladders, etc.


At 1/30/2015 11:30 PM Friday, you wrote:


Won't MEK dissolve the car? I use it as my solvent for plastic kits.
 
__________________________________________________
J. Stephen Sandifer
Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ
Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society
 
From: STMFC@... [ mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 10:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] MTH Paint Remover
 
 

Chuck

Tried acetone or MEK? I mention this because the old Front Range cars
were extremely hard to strip, except with Accupaint thinner, which is
around 75% acetone + MEK. (Fred Becker is the person who found the paint
in the first place, and told George Bishop who quickly switched his AP
brand to that type of paint. AP was originally a complete different paint.)

Tim O'



At 1/30/2015 10:12 PM Friday, you wrote:
Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I’ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.
 
Chuck Davis
Norfolk VA





ed_mines
 

Garth, how do you know the plastic is polystyrene?


Some of the newer cars are made of plastic that seems to be stronger than polystyrene in thin cross section.


Try a little ketone where an accident will not show.


Ed Mines


Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 1/31/2015 10:59 AM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] wrote:
Garth, how do you know the plastic is polystyrene?
    Most of the imported stuff like MTH and BLI is made of ABS.  A quick check of MTH site says ABS.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Tony Thompson
 

Try a little ketone where an accident will not show.

         As many of you know, our familiar acetone is, chemically, dimethyl ketone. The MEK of song and legend is methyl ethyl ketone, very similar in many ways.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





destorzek@...
 

Just keep in mind, ABS is Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. Both Acetone and MEK will still attack the styrene portion of that mix.

Dennis Storzek


Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Ed,

Good point. I'm used to stripping TM, Athearn and Roundhouse. Since I got rid of most of those old relics, I haven't done much stripping. New plastics are an unknown world for me.

I once stripped a Bachmann 44-tonner shell in brake fluid, and had it turn to rubber. I don't want a repeat of that on a $50 car.

Yours Aye,


Garth



On 1/31/15 1:59 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Garth, how do you know the plastic is polystyrene?


Some of the newer cars are made of plastic that seems to be stronger than polystyrene in thin cross section.


Try a little ketone where an accident will not show.


Ed Mines



Greg Martin
 

Garth, Tim and all,
 
Acetone and MEK will eat plastic and craze it almost instantly... If you want to do yours first and tell me how it worked out for you, let me know.
 
Chuck, spend a buck, go to The Dollar Tree and buy some "AWSOME" in that back of the store with the cleaners and you can't miss it as it is a yellow liquid. I would let it soak overnight and lightly scrub it the next day with a soft tooth brush. Keep it at room temperature for the best results. Keep it away from your wife's cabinets and other painted or varnished surfaces.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
Garth Groff replies:

Friends,

Would acetone/lacquer thinner/fingernail polish remover be safe? I use this to strip paint from fiberglass (on archery bows), but I'm not sure of its effect on styrene.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff"


Michael Watnoski
 

Geetings,

    I haven't any luck with 'Awesome'.  I did have good results with ProForce Floor Stripper from Sam's Club.  It has the odor of Chameleaon with a caustic base.  It is cheap and reusable.

Michael

On 1/31/2015 5:21 PM, tgregmrtn@... [STMFC] wrote:
Garth, Tim and all,
 
Acetone and MEK will eat plastic and craze it almost instantly... If you want to do yours first and tell me how it worked out for you, let me know.
 
Chuck, spend a buck, go to The Dollar Tree and buy some "AWSOME" in that back of the store with the cleaners and you can't miss it as it is a yellow liquid. I would let it soak overnight and lightly scrub it the next day with a soft tooth brush. Keep it at room temperature for the best results. Keep it away from your wife's cabinets and other painted or varnished surfaces.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
Garth Groff replies:
Friends,

Would acetone/lacquer thinner/fingernail polish remover be safe? I use this to strip paint from fiberglass (on archery bows), but I'm not sure of its effect on styrene.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff"


Layout Tour
 

Thanks for the recommendations guys.  Acetone is definitely not compatible with the MTH car, but fortunately it’s a hopper and a patch will cover that spot.   I tried  “Awesome” which Greg had recommended and it had absolutely no effect.

 

Jeff Damerst of shawmutcarshops.com, who does custom painting and decals, emailed me that MTH came up with a paint method for their Gauge One which he suspects they have applied to the smaller scales. They made the paint almost impossible to get off as other manufacturers had paint the would chip or not hold up well when running trains in the garden environment.

 

He recommended to wet sand the lettering off using Solvaset as a medium, fine sand paper, and an old rag to wipe away the residue.  I tried it on a N&W hopper and it worked great.  This car is a black plastic with some type of flat finish.  I used a small piece of 1200 grit wet/dry paper dipped in Solvaset and it quickly removed the raised N&W lettering and left a shiny surface.  For the smaller lettering I dipped a Q-tip in Solvaset and after repeated rubbing it eventually removed the lettering without damaging the rivets.

 

Chuck Davis

 


Tim O'Connor
 


About a year ago someone posted that the active ingredient in Solvaset is
called "Butyl Cellosolve" -- and that this is also present in Chameleon stripper.

Tim O'


Thanks for the recommendations guys.  Acetone is definitely not compatible with the MTH car, but fortunately it�s a hopper and a patch will cover that spot.   I tried  �Awesome� which Greg had recommended and it had absolutely no effect.
 
Jeff Damerst of shawmutcarshops.com, who does custom painting and decals, emailed me that MTH came up with a paint method for their Gauge One which he suspects they have applied to the smaller scales. They made the paint almost impossible to get off as other manufacturers had paint the would chip or not hold up well when running trains in the garden environment.
 
He recommended to wet sand the lettering off using Solvaset as a medium, fine sand paper, and an old rag to wipe away the residue.  I tried it on a N&W hopper and it worked great.  This car is a black plastic with some type of flat finish.  I used a small piece of 1200 grit wet/dry paper dipped in Solvaset and it quickly removed the raised N&W lettering and left a shiny surface.  For the smaller lettering I dipped a Q-tip in Solvaset and after repeated rubbing it eventually removed the lettering without damaging the rivets.
 
Chuck Davis


John Sykes III
 

OK, here it is again.

Butyl cellosolve (2-butoxy ethanol) is available in one gallon cans at large Sherwin Williams Paint stores (it is used by professional cabinet makers to slow down lacquer drying, or so I was told).  It is around $55/gal, so you might want to get a whole club to share the expense.  The formula for Chameleon or Wash-Away paint stripper is roughly the following:

Buy a 1 pint bottle of 91% isopropyl alcohol at WalMart or any pharmacy.

Measure out 4 oz of the isopropyl and throw it away (or use it for something else).

DO NOT USE 70% ISOPROPYL!  IT WON'T WORK RIGHT.

Replace the 4 oz taken out of the bottle with an equal amount of butyl cellosolve.  Put top back on and shake well.  Make sure to label your new paint stripper, so you don't goof and use it for alcohol.

Butyl cellosolve is also the active ingredient in Hobsco Solvaset, but I haven't found the proportions yet (I think it is just butyl cellosolve in distilled water but don't know if it is 2%, 5% or whatever).

-- John