EJ&E 2-bay offset hopper car


Tim O'Connor
 

This car doesn't have all the typical features of an "AAR standard"
design and doesn't have the features of the "AMC standard" either --
Is there a "type" for this car or do I just stash it into the "other"
bucket?

http://columbusrailroads.com/Ralston%20photos/ralston-092-1940-EJ&E.JPG

Tim O'Connor


David
 

The EJ&E car in particular is an oddball, due to the nonstandard side post count. The chisel-corner in general was an Enterprise design that they promoted in the trade press.

David Thompson


Todd Horton
 

Does anyone know where these cars were generally loaded?  I assume they bought them for on line customers.  Todd Horton

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, February 14, 2015 3:45 AM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] EJ&E 2-bay offset hopper car

 

 


This car doesn't have all the typical features of an "AAR standard"
design and doesn't have the features of the "AMC standard" either --
Is there a "type" for this car or do I just stash it into the "other"
bucket?

http://columbusrailroads.com/Ralston%20photos/ralston-092-1940-EJ&E.JPG

Tim O'Connor


Tim O'Connor
 

Perhaps for coke, inter-plant movements? I was in South Chicago about 5-6 years
ago and saw some ancient 1940's/1950's hoppers and gondolas that appeared to still
be in use with steel plant markings on them.

Tim O'Connor

Does anyone know where these cars were generally loaded? I assume they bought them for on line customers. Todd Horton


Jack Mullen
 

Tim,

I guess I'd call it a non-standard derivative of the 1935 AAR design (and/or AMC alternate). It's larger (34' 9" IL vs 33 '0") and makes extensive use of high-tensile steel for lighter weight. The J seems to have been in the forefront of Cor-ten steel use in this era, thanks to its paent company. The photo appears in U.S. Steel's ad touting Cor-ten and Man-ten steels in the '43 Cyc   High-strength steel allows the side sheets to be thinner, but the thinner sheet is less stiff, so more closely spaced posts are used.

The Apr. 1942 ORER lists 1700 cars in series 40000-41699. I don't know whether they were all from one lot, or even one carbuilder, but only the one group, with one set of dimensions is listed.
IL 34' 9"
IW 10' 4"
OL 35' 10"
EW 10' 5"
EH  10' 8"
CUFT 2238
CAPY 100000
In the photo, the stencilled LTWT is 39300, which is near the low end of weights for the AAR std. 33', 2145 cu ft cars.

Post steam era, the survivors were rebuilt with 11-post outside post sides.

As to use, I wouldn't say they didn't haul coke, but the 129,700# load limit divided by cubic capacity is about 58 lb/cuft, so the size is optimized for coal. EJ&E delivered a lot of coal, and though probably most was received in foreign cars in interchange, in the steam era it did originate significant coal traffic, both on its Coal City branch, and from the region around Danville IL via C&EI trackage rights.

Jack Mullen
 


Tim O'Connor
 

Thanks Jack! I never knew about the EJ&E coal mine connection.

Tim O'

I guess I'd call it a non-standard derivative of the 1935 AAR design (and/or AMC alternate). It's larger (34' 9" IL vs 33 '0") and makes extensive use of high-tensile steel for lighter weight. The J seems to have been in the forefront of Cor-ten steel use in this era, thanks to its paent company. The photo appears in U.S. Steel's ad touting Cor-ten and Man-ten steels in the '43 Cyc High-strength steel allows the side sheets to be thinner, but the thinner sheet is less stiff, so more closely spaced posts are used.

The Apr. 1942 ORER lists 1700 cars in series 40000-41699. I don't know whether they were all from one lot, or even one carbuilder, but only the one group, with one set of dimensions is listed.

IL 34' 9"
IW 10' 4"
OL 35' 10"
EW 10' 5"
EH 10' 8"
CUFT 2238
CAPY 100000

In the photo, the stencilled LTWT is 39300, which is near the low end of weights for the AAR std. 33', 2145 cu ft cars.

Post steam era, the survivors were rebuilt with 11-post outside post sides.

As to use, I wouldn't say they didn't haul coke, but the 129,700# load limit divided by cubic capacity is about 58 lb/cuft, so the size is optimized for coal. EJ&E delivered a lot of coal, and though probably most was received in foreign cars in interchange, in the steam era it did originate significant coal traffic, both on its Coal City branch, and from the region around Danville IL via C&EI trackage rights.

Jack Mullen