Tru Color Paint Stripper?


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesn’t address suitable strippers for their paints, so I’d like to know what to use to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.

 

Nelson Moyer


mwbauers
 

The old rule is that if the paint job is grainy, as if drying before it hits the model…… you are spraying from too far away.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On May 28, 2015, at 12:01 PM, 'Nelson Moyer' wrote:


I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesn’t address suitable strippers for their paints, so I’d like to know what to use to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.



Nelson Moyer


Tim O'Connor
 

Nelson

If Tru Color behaves anything like Accupaint, an overspray of thinner with
a couple drops of retarder should repair the damage. Remember that AP and TruColor
are lacquers, not enamels -- they are just colors deposited on the model and do
not polymerize when they dry.

Did you thoroughly clean the resin before painting? Even the slightest mold release
residue can cause problems. I always prime resin before using AP.

Tim O'Connor

I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesn�t address suitable strippers for their paints, so I�d like to know what to use to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.

Nelson Moyer


Tim O'Connor
 

With AP (and probably TruColor) you can get "premature drying" from having
too little thinner/retarder in the mix, and you can also get "blushing" (which
looks flat and grainy) from high humidity. But as I said in the other message
AP is extremely forgiving and can usually be repaired without stripping.

Tim O'

The old rule is that if the paint job is grainy, as if drying before it hits the model�� you are spraying from too far away.

Mike Bauers


Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Did you thoroughly clean the resin before painting? Even the slightest mold release
residue can cause problems. I always prime resin before using AP.
I have found that even with careful cleaning of resin parts (mold release, oils, whatever), Tru-Color does not seem to stick well to resin. I agree with Tim, prime it first with a solvent-based paint. It has eliminated my problems.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Mike, that wasn’t the question. I already know the issues re grainy paint i.e. too much air pressure and/or too far away. What I want to know is, what do I strip Tru Color paint. You didn’t address that questions, so why the post?



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:29 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?





The old rule is that if the paint job is grainy, as if drying before it hits the model…… you are spraying from too far away.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On May 28, 2015, at 12:01 PM, 'Nelson Moyer' wrote:


I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesn’t address suitable strippers for their paints, so I’d like to know what to use to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.



Nelson Moyer




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Tim,

Yes, I washed with Dawn, rinsed well, and dried. I'm thinking about rinsing
with 70% isopropanol after that on the next paint batch. I primed with
Tamiya Fine White Primer. I use White for white, yellow, orange, and red
final coats and Tamiya Fine Light Gray for everything else. I wasn't doing
model railroading during the Accupaint era, so I have no experience with it.

I emailed Tru Color at the same time I posted my question, and their
response came in amazingly fast. They recommend brake fluid. I asked them to
add that to the online FAQ.

Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2015 1:09 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?

Nelson

If Tru Color behaves anything like Accupaint, an overspray of thinner with a
couple drops of retarder should repair the damage. Remember that AP and
TruColor are lacquers, not enamels -- they are just colors deposited on the
model and do not polymerize when they dry.

Did you thoroughly clean the resin before painting? Even the slightest mold
release residue can cause problems. I always prime resin before using AP.

Tim O'Connor






I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new
Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less
air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat
grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesnt
address suitable strippers for their paints, so Id like to know what to use
to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.

Nelson Moyer


------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Allen Montgomery
 

I live in Arizona, where any paint can flash before hitting the surface. But I have been having big problems with Tru color, as you described. I too use an Iwata. I called the company and they recommended dropping the pressure. This did not work. My Iwata doesn't like 30 to 35 PSI. This only made the problem worse. The company also suggested using their thinner, which I have not tried. The best results I have had were to thin the paint even more, 25/75. This has solved the problem, mostly. To correct the models that turned out grainy I used a flow coat of super thinned paint, then the gloss coat for decals took the rest out. I didn't add too much more paint to the surface and my decal work went off without a hitch. Not exactly what you wanted to know, but it might be an easier fix for you. I hope that is helpful.
As a bonus WATCH OUT, look out for the following problem. Let me explain. Three days ago I was weathering freight cars, first with a grimy black wash from Floquil. I had maybe 6 to 7 drops left in my work pot. As I use the same thinner for Floquil and Tru Color, I left it in the pot and mixed up a batch of Tru Color Grime. I added the thinner first, then the moment I added the Tru Color it gelled up into a blob at the bottom of the pot, seperating completely from the thinner. Easy to get out, but a waste of paint. I have had smaller amounts of Floquil reside in a work pot, but there is evidently a tipping point.
Allen



On Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:22 PM, "'Nelson Moyer' ku0a@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Tim,

Yes, I washed with Dawn, rinsed well, and dried. I'm thinking about rinsing
with 70% isopropanol after that on the next paint batch. I primed with
Tamiya Fine White Primer. I use White for white, yellow, orange, and red
final coats and Tamiya Fine Light Gray for everything else. I wasn't doing
model railroading during the Accupaint era, so I have no experience with it.

I emailed Tru Color at the same time I posted my question, and their
response came in amazingly fast. They recommend brake fluid. I asked them to
add that to the online FAQ.

Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2015 1:09 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?

Nelson

If Tru Color behaves anything like Accupaint, an overspray of thinner with a
couple drops of retarder should repair the damage. Remember that AP and
TruColor are lacquers, not enamels -- they are just colors deposited on the
model and do not polymerize when they dry.

Did you thoroughly clean the resin before painting? Even the slightest mold
release residue can cause problems. I always prime resin before using AP.

Tim O'Connor

>I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new
Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less
air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat
grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesnt
address suitable strippers for their paints, so Id like to know what to use
to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.
>
>Nelson Moyer

------------------------------------

------------------------------------

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links




Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Allen,



Floquil thinner was a mix of toluene and xylene. The chemical composition of Testor’s Universal Thinner isn’t given on the can, and I haven’t looked for the MSDS, so I don’t know what they’re using now. Tru Color is acetone based, and I use acetone to clean up after using it per their recommendation. It’s not surprising that Tru Color would clot in a Floquil thinner, given the differences in chemical composition for the thinners and the paints. I haven’t tried Tru Color thinner yet since I’ve been spraying undiluted, but I’ll get some and try your dilution (3:1 paint to thinner) or maybe a 4:1 dilution for starters.



One other thing I’ve noticed with Tru Color is that you have to get the amount of paint exactly even on the whole model or there are some parts that are glossier than others. My Iwata gravity feed airbrush has a spray pattern about half the size of my Paasche H-series using either a #3 or #5 tip, and I haven’t adjusted to the need for more passes closer together. I haven’t sprayed a dull finish over any of my Tru Color painted models yet, so I don’t know if the dull finish smooths out the shiny and not so shiny parts of the model. Overall, I’m finding Tru Color more difficult to make peace with than Poly Scale was after Floquil.



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2015 3:00 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?





I live in Arizona, where any paint can flash before hitting the surface. But I have been having big problems with Tru color, as you described. I too use an Iwata. I called the company and they recommended dropping the pressure. This did not work. My Iwata doesn't like 30 to 35 PSI. This only made the problem worse. The company also suggested using their thinner, which I have not tried. The best results I have had were to thin the paint even more, 25/75. This has solved the problem, mostly. To correct the models that turned out grainy I used a flow coat of super thinned paint, then the gloss coat for decals took the rest out. I didn't add too much more paint to the surface and my decal work went off without a hitch. Not exactly what you wanted to know, but it might be an easier fix for you. I hope that is helpful.

As a bonus WATCH OUT, look out for the following problem. Let me explain. Three days ago I was weathering freight cars, first with a grimy black wash from Floquil. I had maybe 6 to 7 drops left in my work pot. As I use the same thinner for Floquil and Tru Color, I left it in the pot and mixed up a batch of Tru Color Grime. I added the thinner first, then the moment I added the Tru Color it gelled up into a blob at the bottom of the pot, seperating completely from the thinner. Easy to get out, but a waste of paint. I have had smaller amounts of Floquil reside in a work pot, but there is evidently a tipping point.

Allen





On Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:22 PM, "'Nelson Moyer' ku0a@mchsi.com [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:





Tim,

Yes, I washed with Dawn, rinsed well, and dried. I'm thinking about rinsing
with 70% isopropanol after that on the next paint batch. I primed with
Tamiya Fine White Primer. I use White for white, yellow, orange, and red
final coats and Tamiya Fine Light Gray for everything else. I wasn't doing
model railroading during the Accupaint era, so I have no experience with it.

I emailed Tru Color at the same time I posted my question, and their
response came in amazingly fast. They recommend brake fluid. I asked them to
add that to the online FAQ.

Nelson

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2015 1:09 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?

Nelson

If Tru Color behaves anything like Accupaint, an overspray of thinner with a
couple drops of retarder should repair the damage. Remember that AP and
TruColor are lacquers, not enamels -- they are just colors deposited on the
model and do not polymerize when they dry.

Did you thoroughly clean the resin before painting? Even the slightest mold
release residue can cause problems. I always prime resin before using AP.

Tim O'Connor

I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new
Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less
air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat
grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesnt
address suitable strippers for their paints, so Id like to know what to use
to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.

Nelson Moyer
------------------------------------

------------------------------------

------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


mwbauers
 

You state two problems.

I addressed your first.

" and I ended up with flat grainy sides from "

I've been airbrush painting since the late '60's. Your finish problem is not pressure related. That will show up as a very different effect.

Mike Bauers


On May 28, 2015, at 2:05 PM, "'Nelson Moyer' ku0a@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Mike, that wasn’t the question. I already know the issues re grainy paint i.e. too much air pressure and/or too far away. What I want to know is, what do I strip Tru Color paint. You didn’t address that questions, so why the post?

Nelson Moyer

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:29 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?

The old rule is that if the paint job is grainy, as if drying before it hits the model…… you are spraying from too far away.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

> On May 28, 2015, at 12:01 PM, 'Nelson Moyer' wrote:
>
>
> I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesn’t address suitable strippers for their paints, so I’d like to know what to use to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.
>
>
>
> Nelson Moyer


Greg Martin
 

Nelson,
 
I have never personally stripped resin, but I wouldn't use Brake Fluid.  I would try 90% Isopropyl Alcohol. And you can test it on the side of the car in single area to see it is going to 'lift" the paint.
 
I have had similar issues with Tru Color last summer with high humidity and higher temperatures (above 90º). I was able to let it dry and repaint it with another coat later in the evening. I did wet sand some of the worst spots.  I haven't given up on Tru Color but the jury is still out.  I can't seem to get away from FLOQUIL and TESTORS solvent based paints.
 
Greg Martin   
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 5/28/2015 10:28:57 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesn’t address suitable strippers for their paints, so I’d like to know what to use to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.
>
>
>
> Nelson Moyer


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Mike, read the painting primer on the Tamiya web page.



http://www.tamiyausa.com/articles/feature.php?article-id=35#.VWhot5Mo4-U



Keep in mind that this primer refers to rattle cans where the user can’t alter pressure other than by heating the can. With an airbursh, we control both distance and pressure. With acetone based paint, pressure is the overriding culprit at normal painting distance, since the carrier flashes off so quickly with increased air pressure. I was painting at about 36-38 psi at a distance of 5-6 in. when I painted the reefer sides. Any closer would have blown them off the tape! The pressure setting was from the last paint session when I painted the interior of my stock cars with a siphon feed Paasche H and a #5 tip. I started painting with the gravity feed Iwata without reducing the pressure (big mistake), and I flashed the carrier. Have you actually tried painting with Tru Color?



Mr. Johnson’s primer (aside from misspelled words), is the best summary of model painting technique I’ve seen yet, and I imagine many on the list will find it interesting and informative.



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2015 12:29 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?





You state two problems.



I addressed your first.



" and I ended up with flat grainy sides from "

I've been airbrush painting since the late '60's. Your finish problem is not pressure related. That will show up as a very different effect.



Mike Bauers
On May 28, 2015, at 2:05 PM, "'Nelson Moyer' ku0a@mchsi.com <mailto:ku0a@mchsi.com> [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com> > wrote:



Mike, that wasn’t the question. I already know the issues re grainy paint i.e. too much air pressure and/or too far away. What I want to know is, what do I strip Tru Color paint. You didn’t address that questions, so why the post?

Nelson Moyer

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:29 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?

The old rule is that if the paint job is grainy, as if drying before it hits the model…… you are spraying from too far away.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On May 28, 2015, at 12:01 PM, 'Nelson Moyer' wrote:


I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesn’t address suitable strippers for their paints, so I’d like to know what to use to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.



Nelson Moyer


mwbauers
 

I now realize that my practices are not the norm.

From the start I begin spray painting by using a test piece of scrap cardboard to see how the paint I’m using handles and what is the better distance to use to get the best results.

I also prefer to use a paint like Floquil [which I stopped using a long timer ago] and my normal paint is Scalecoat that I apply in perhaps four passes to a side.

I settled in spraying at about 15-pounds of pressure early on and see that the tutes are using 25-35 pounds for the same paints I filter for lumps, thin and spray at 16-pounds. I don’t know why the average looking slightly thinned paints I use work well at much below the now recommended pressure…… but they do.

example..


I’ve alway upped the pressure for water based paints. But by feel to get the spray result I want on a test piece without noting that I should be going directly to 35-pounds or so. I don’t think I ever go that high. I do up the pressure for water based paints. But I don’t think I go to 35 pounds with the same common airbrushes that I use at 15 pounds.

So I’m misting on the paint from a distance that works well with the slightly thinned paint under a pressure that others would tell me is just too low.

I don’t know better. I just know that I test it each time before I paint a model and that it works so well for me that I’ve not had to use nor discover what the conventional settings had become. When I started spray painting ages ago, 12-15 pounds was recommended for thinned and additive gloss standard Floquil and I have that as my base setting.

A good spray painting is a combination and dependent interaction of the pressure used, the distance sprayed from, the fluidity of the paint mix, and the chosen speed at which the airbrush is passed over the model while traveling from side to side.

I must conclude that I really can’t advise on spray painting since my well-practiced method is seemingly not practical per the common recommendations.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On May 29, 2015, at 8:50 AM, 'Nelson Moyer' ku0a@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Mike, read the painting primer on the Tamiya web page.

http://www.tamiyausa.com/articles/feature.php?article-id=35#.VWhot5Mo4-U

Keep in mind that this primer refers to rattle cans where the user can’t alter pressure other than by heating the can. With an airbursh, we control both distance and pressure. With acetone based paint, pressure is the overriding culprit at normal painting distance, since the carrier flashes off so quickly with increased air pressure. I was painting at about 36-38 psi at a distance of 5-6 in. when I painted the reefer sides. Any closer would have blown them off the tape! The pressure setting was from the last paint session when I painted the interior of my stock cars with a siphon feed Paasche H and a #5 tip. I started painting with the gravity feed Iwata without reducing the pressure (big mistake), and I flashed the carrier. Have you actually tried painting with Tru Color?

Mr. Johnson’s primer (aside from misspelled words), is the best summary of model painting technique I’ve seen yet, and I imagine many on the list will find it interesting and informative.

Nelson Moyer

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] 
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2015 12:29 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?

You state two problems.

I addressed your first.

" and I ended up with flat grainy sides from "

I've been airbrush painting since the late '60's. Your finish problem is not pressure related. That will show up as a very different effect.

Mike Bauers



On May 28, 2015, at 2:05 PM, "'Nelson Moyer' ku0a@... <mailto:ku0a@...> [STMFC]" <STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC@...> > wrote:

Mike, that wasn’t the question. I already know the issues re grainy paint i.e. too much air pressure and/or too far away. What I want to know is, what do I strip Tru Color paint. You didn’t address that questions, so why the post?

Nelson Moyer

From: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> [mailto:STMFC@...] 
Sent: Thursday, May 28, 2015 12:29 PM
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC@...> 
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tru Color Paint Stripper?

The old rule is that if the paint job is grainy, as if drying before it hits the model…… you are spraying from too far away.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

> On May 28, 2015, at 12:01 PM, 'Nelson Moyer' wrote:
> 
> 
> I painted two reefer sides with Tru Color WFE Yellow last night using a new Iwata gravity feed airbrush. Apparently, the gravity feed takes much less air pressure than my Paasche siphon feed airbrush, and I ended up with flat grainy sides from too much air pressure. The Tru Color web page doesn’t address suitable strippers for their paints, so I’d like to know what to use to strip the Sunshine resin sides without damaging them.
> 
> 
> 
> Nelson Moyer


Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

This has been an interesting thread. I too believe that the results that Nelson reports are from too high pressure.  The pressure that I find best with TruColor is about 15-20 psi. 

Increasingly, Tru-Color is my go-to paint, very forgiving and producing a lovely smooth finish.  I too use an Iwata Eclipse, but I use removable 0.5 oz. bottles with a Paasche double-action coupling rather than a gravity feed ( I am not certain why feed type would make any difference, however). I thin Tru-Color paint 50/50 with their own brand thinner.  Other thinners might work, but IMHO the risk/cost ratio is not worth investigating.

I am not above stripping flawed paint finishes, but I believe that I would first try the other simpler methods already advised.

Denny    

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA






Allen Montgomery
 

FWIW, I use Home Depot Mineral Spirits for my thinner. I have good success with both Floquil and Tru Color. Evidently not together in small amounts. Nelson, thanks for telling me that Tru color is Acetone based. I will by a can of that and see if it works better than mineral spirits. As I do a lot of airbrushing, my wallet finds that this is the best way to go.
Allen



On Friday, May 29, 2015 1:11 PM, "Denny Anspach danspachmd@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
This has been an interesting thread. I too believe that the results that Nelson reports are from too high pressure.  The pressure that I find best with TruColor is about 15-20 psi. 

Increasingly, Tru-Color is my go-to paint, very forgiving and producing a lovely smooth finish.  I too use an Iwata Eclipse, but I use removable 0.5 oz. bottles with a Paasche double-action coupling rather than a gravity feed ( I am not certain why feed type would make any difference, however). I thin Tru-Color paint 50/50 with their own brand thinner.  Other thinners might work, but IMHO the risk/cost ratio is not worth investigating.

I am not above stripping flawed paint finishes, but I believe that I would first try the other simpler methods already advised.

Denny    

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA








Jack Burgess
 

Denny wrote:

 

[Snip] I too use an Iwata Eclipse, but I use removable 0.5 oz. bottles with a Paasche double-action coupling rather than a gravity feed ( I am not certain why feed type would make any difference, however). I thin Tru-Color paint 50/50 with their own brand thinner.  Other thinners might work, but IMHO the risk/cost ratio is not worth investigating.

 

It took a while but I finally realized that with a gravity feed airbrush, I didn’t need to thin Floquil at all…

 

Jack Burgess


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Allen,



While Tru Color is acetone based, I wouldn’t rush out to buy acetone as a diluent. Acetone is good for cleanup, but I stay with the manufacturer’s thinner for dilutions. Tru Color’s web site says that you may lose the gloss finish if you use acetone for a dilution thinner. Since I haven’t tried diluting with acetone, I can’t speak to the results. The solvent base in Tru Color is more complicated than just acetone.



Nelson Moyer





From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2015 4:19 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tru Color Paint Stripper?





FWIW, I use Home Depot Mineral Spirits for my thinner. I have good success with both Floquil and Tru Color. Evidently not together in small amounts. Nelson, thanks for telling me that Tru color is Acetone based. I will by a can of that and see if it works better than mineral spirits. As I do a lot of airbrushing, my wallet finds that this is the best way to go.

Allen





On Friday, May 29, 2015 1:11 PM, "Denny Anspach danspachmd@gmail.com [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:





This has been an interesting thread. I too believe that the results that Nelson reports are from too high pressure. The pressure that I find best with TruColor is about 15-20 psi.



Increasingly, Tru-Color is my go-to paint, very forgiving and producing a lovely smooth finish. I too use an Iwata Eclipse, but I use removable 0.5 oz. bottles with a Paasche double-action coupling rather than a gravity feed ( I am not certain why feed type would make any difference, however). I thin Tru-Color paint 50/50 with their own brand thinner. Other thinners might work, but IMHO the risk/cost ratio is not worth investigating.



I am not above stripping flawed paint finishes, but I believe that I would first try the other simpler methods already advised.



Denny



Denny S. Anspach MD

Okoboji, IA















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Andy Harman
 

I use generic paint thinner for cleanup
and soak the business end of the airbrush in it between sessions.  But I always use the branded thinner for airbrushing regardless.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On May 29, 2015, at 4:11 PM, "Denny Anspach danspachmd@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

This has been an interesting thread. I too believe that the results that Nelson reports are from too high pressure.  The pressure that I find best with TruColor is about 15-20 psi. 

Increasingly, Tru-Color is my go-to paint, very forgiving and producing a lovely smooth finish.  I too use an Iwata Eclipse, but I use removable 0.5 oz. bottles with a Paasche double-action coupling rather than a gravity feed ( I am not certain why feed type would make any difference, however). I thin Tru-Color paint 50/50 with their own brand thinner.  Other thinners might work, but IMHO the risk/cost ratio is not worth investigating.

I am not above stripping flawed paint finishes, but I believe that I would first try the other simpler methods already advised.

Denny    

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA