Airbrushing Acrylics


Bill Welch
 

Given the thread about handling Tru-Color paints, I cannot remember if I have ever voiced an important caveat for those that might be interested in painting with Acrylics, which I have been doing for over 20 years now on both styrene and resin.


For the first couple of years I was using a Binks "Wren" airbrush with mixed results, often having to stop and clean the airbrush. That changed when Badger introduced their "Anthem" #155 that has a .76mm Needle and Nozzle or Tip, the issue being that Acrylics require a larger opening to be sprayed successfully. If you have been unhappy with your efforts with Acrylics, you may want to invest in a new AB with a larger tip and matching need. I know Passche now offers ABs with larger openings, their Talon can be equipped with a .66mm needle/tip combo for example, and Grex has large needle/tips combos also.


The 155 is a siphon feed and I spray at 20-22 PSI.


For cleaning, after I paint, I do an initial cleanse with Distilled water w/back flush, then Windex w/back flush,  water again, and finish up with 91% Isopropyl Alcohol. This last step is a recent addition and now when I pull the needle out to clean it out it is really clean of paint. Regardless I pulll the needle through a Paper Shop Towel a couple of time, apply a dab of Needle Lub and rub it between my fingers a couple of times to spread it along the length of the needle, then pull it through a paper towell to remove the excess.


Bill Welch


Douglas Harding
 

I will echo on Bill’s comments regarding acrylic paints, especially Model-Flex. I have both the Badger Anthem 155 and an Iwata Eclipse, both siphon feed. The larger tip is necessary for acrylic paints. Cleaning immediately after using, at the very least flushing with water after each use is necessary as the paint dries so fast. I also paint about 20lbs air pressure. A large bottle of Windex sits next to my cleaning station, ie my paint booth sits next to a sink allowing for fast flushing and clean up. The ammonia in the Windex cuts the acrylic paint, at least in Model-Flex.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


frograbbit602
 

Doug Harding wrote, A large bottle of Windex sits next to my cleaning station, ie my
paint booth sits next to a sink allowing for fast flushing and clean up. The
ammonia in the Windex cuts the acrylic paint, at least in Model-Flex.

The Windex also works great with Polly Scale in cleanup of my Paasche H, VL, Talon or Badger 105 Patriot.
Lester Breuer


Andy Harman
 

I won a Badger as a door prize some years back, I think it's the 155.  Have never used it.  I use Scalecoat II as my preferred paint with a Paasche Millenium VL.  I've airbrushed the defunct Pollyscale with it but not as a primary coat.

Right now the only acrylic paint I will use is Tamiya, which airbrushes fine in my VL.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On May 29, 2015, at 5:21 PM, "fgexbill@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Given the thread about handling Tru-Color paints, I cannot remember if I have ever voiced an important caveat for those that might be interested in painting with Acrylics, which I have been doing for over 20 years now on both styrene and resin.


For the first couple of years I was using a Binks "Wren" airbrush with mixed results, often having to stop and clean the airbrush. That changed when Badger introduced their "Anthem" #155 that has a .76mm Needle and Nozzle or Tip, the issue being that Acrylics require a larger opening to be sprayed successfully. If you have been unhappy with your efforts with Acrylics, you may want to invest in a new AB with a larger tip and matching need. I know Passche now offers ABs with larger openings, their Talon can be equipped with a .66mm needle/tip combo for example, and Grex has large needle/tips combos also.


The 155 is a siphon feed and I spray at 20-22 PSI.


For cleaning, after I paint, I do an initial cleanse with Distilled water w/back flush, then Windex w/back flush,  water again, and finish up with 91% Isopropyl Alcohol. This last step is a recent addition and now when I pull the needle out to clean it out it is really clean of paint. Regardless I pulll the needle through a Paper Shop Towel a couple of time, apply a dab of Needle Lub and rub it between my fingers a couple of times to spread it along the length of the needle, then pull it through a paper towell to remove the excess.


Bill Welch


Andy Harman
 

Also I fully endorse Windex for any form of acrylic cleanup.  Brushes, needles, jars, hands... Works great.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On May 29, 2015, at 5:21 PM, "fgexbill@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Given the thread about handling Tru-Color paints, I cannot remember if I have ever voiced an important caveat for those that might be interested in painting with Acrylics, which I have been doing for over 20 years now on both styrene and resin.


For the first couple of years I was using a Binks "Wren" airbrush with mixed results, often having to stop and clean the airbrush. That changed when Badger introduced their "Anthem" #155 that has a .76mm Needle and Nozzle or Tip, the issue being that Acrylics require a larger opening to be sprayed successfully. If you have been unhappy with your efforts with Acrylics, you may want to invest in a new AB with a larger tip and matching need. I know Passche now offers ABs with larger openings, their Talon can be equipped with a .66mm needle/tip combo for example, and Grex has large needle/tips combos also.


The 155 is a siphon feed and I spray at 20-22 PSI.


For cleaning, after I paint, I do an initial cleanse with Distilled water w/back flush, then Windex w/back flush,  water again, and finish up with 91% Isopropyl Alcohol. This last step is a recent addition and now when I pull the needle out to clean it out it is really clean of paint. Regardless I pulll the needle through a Paper Shop Towel a couple of time, apply a dab of Needle Lub and rub it between my fingers a couple of times to spread it along the length of the needle, then pull it through a paper towell to remove the excess.


Bill Welch


Bill Welch
 

I too use Windex as a part of my routine but 91% Isopropyl is now my final step and is more effective than the Windex. I also keep a Q-Tip saturated with the same alcohol to wipe the tip to take care of the paint build-up.

Bill Welch


John F. Cizmar
 

FWIW, I recently attended an airbrush weathering class @ Chicago Airbrush Supply sponsored by Grex.  The presenter instructed us not to use Windex to clean their airbrushes with Windex.  Apparantly there is or can be an issue with the ammonia conponent and the airbrush internals.
John Cizmar   



From: "fgexbill@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2015 2:54 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Airbrushing Acrylics

 
I too use Windex as a part of my routine but 91% Isopropyl is now my final step and is more effective than the Windex. I also keep a Q-Tip saturated with the same alcohol to wipe the tip to take care of the paint build-up.

Bill Welch



Bill Welch
 

Yes and it also can degrade the chrome and/or nickel plating. I use very little, as my main cleaner is the 91% Isopropyl Alcohol. Much more effective.

How did you like the GREX line John? They look to be well made with some clever design features. John Golden said that a dealer will be at the Collinsville, IL gathering selling the GREX line.

Bill
 


John F. Cizmar
 

Bill,
I like them.  It was first experience with a double-action airbrush.  I found the pistol grip trigger easy to operate.  The nozzles are magnetized making cleaning them a snap.
John  



From: "fgexbill@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, June 1, 2015 8:58 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Airbrushing Acrylics

 
Yes and it also can degrade the chrome and/or nickel plating. I use very little, as my main cleaner is the 91% Isopropyl Alcohol. Much more effective.

How did you like the GREX line John? They look to be well made with some clever design features. John Golden said that a dealer will be at the Collinsville, IL gathering selling the GREX line.

Bill
 



John F. Cizmar
 

BTW, the presenter was Bryant Dunbar.  He introduced us to, "pre-shading", a military modeling technique.  The first color we applied over the primed model was black to the corners and vertical surfaces, next came the body color etc.  The effect was striking.
John Cizmar  



From: "fgexbill@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, June 1, 2015 8:58 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Airbrushing Acrylics

 
Yes and it also can degrade the chrome and/or nickel plating. I use very little, as my main cleaner is the 91% Isopropyl Alcohol. Much more effective.

How did you like the GREX line John? They look to be well made with some clever design features. John Golden said that a dealer will be at the Collinsville, IL gathering selling the GREX line.

Bill