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This image and the next three


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Are documentation images of an accident in Plymouth PA, 1892.  Several DL&W box cars and context.

 

 

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-20-15/C1173.jpg

 

Schuyler


Tim O'Connor
 


flat tire, circa 1892



Are documentation images of an accident in Plymouth PA, 1892.  Several DL&W box cars and context.
 
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-20-15/C1173.jpg
 
Schuyler


Charles Peck
 

I find the group of three insulated box cars interesting.  All in rough shape as in "not suitable for interchange"
but then likely only in local use anyway.  No poling pockets although I understand poling was common
in that era.  The center car of the three has a truss rod loose and perhaps the queenpost missing.  Certainly
sagging for lack of attention.  I suppose wooden cars of the era did require a lot more attention from the
car shops than the later steel cars. 
The canvas(?) above and below the doors are interesting features. Extra padding to better seal the doors
against sags and twists? 
Certainly an era that would be very interesting to model if I knew more about it all.
Chuck Peck (so very grateful for modern air conditioning in Florida) 

On Sat, Jun 20, 2015 at 11:02 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Are documentation images of an accident in Plymouth PA, 1892.  Several DL&W box cars and context.

 

 

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-20-15/C1173.jpg

 

Schuyler



MDelvec952
 



Likely there was a fatality, which is why they kept the wrecked wagon there long enough to dispatch a photographer with an 8x10 view camera, likely the next day.

And I don't mean to embarrass Schuyler, but this photo is from 1912. The "boxcars" on the siding are actually ice cars, which were insulated and had plug doors, most of which were built for ice service and not intended or marked for interchange. The Pocono Mountains had many lakes and ice harvesters.

The photo is at Plymouth is on the "Bloom," the line between Scranton and Northumberland that passed through Bloomsburg that was very coal laden near Scranton end.  That's the Parrish Breaker in the distance that straddles the main line.

           ....Mike Del Vecchio



-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sun, Jun 21, 2015 3:44 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] This image and the next three

 

flat tire, circa 1892



Are documentation images of an accident in Plymouth PA, 1892.  Several DL&W box cars and context.
 
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-20-15/C1173.jpg
 
Schuyler


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Quite right, Mike, 1912.  It was the 1892 date on the map that led me astray, that and being up past what apparently is my bedtime . . .

 

Schuyler

 

 

Likely there was a fatality, which is why they kept the wrecked wagon there long enough to dispatch a photographer with an 8x10 view camera, likely the next day.

 

And I don't mean to embarrass Schuyler, but this photo is from 1912. The "boxcars" on the siding are actually ice cars, which were insulated and had plug doors, most of which were built for ice service and not intended or marked for interchange. The Pocono Mountains had many lakes and ice harvesters.

 

The photo is at Plymouth is on the "Bloom," the line between Scranton and Northumberland that passed through Bloomsburg that was very coal laden near Scranton end.  That's the Parrish Breaker in the distance that straddles the main line.

 

           ....Mike Del Vecchio



-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sun, Jun 21, 2015 3:44 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] This image and the next three

 


flat tire, circa 1892


Are documentation images of an accident in Plymouth PA, 1892.  Several DL&W box cars and context.
 
http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-20-15/C1173.jpg
 
Schuyler


mwbauers
 

So…… [might be a silly question of mine]

Were these cars mainly used to ship the stored ice from the warehouses to the distributors in the warmer months of the year?

Its hard to see from the angle………

Are the loading doors similar to regular hinged reefer doors………. or sliding plug doors?

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Jun 21, 2015, at 5:14 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

his photo is from 1912. The "boxcars" on the siding are actually ice cars, which were insulated and had plug doors, most of which were built for ice service and not intended or marked for interchange. The Pocono Mountains had many lakes and ice harvesters.




John Larkin
 

I can see what appears to be a poling pocket on the first car in the series.  The rest would, of course, be hidden.

John Larkin


Charles Peck
 

I looked at all three photos and all I see on the corners is a large cast washer under the nut that
fastens the outer truss rod to the end sill.  
Chuck Peck

On Mon, Jun 22, 2015 at 10:07 AM, John Larkin jflarkingrc@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I can see what appears to be a poling pocket on the first car in the series.  The rest would, of course, be hidden.

John Larkin



Dennis Storzek
 

There was never any requirement to have poling pockets. They were a defensive move by the railroads; otherwise creative switchmen would jam the pole wherever they though it wouldn't slip, and if it happened to damage the car, not their problem. Same thing with roping staples; railroads started adding them to keep customers with car movers from ripping the sill steps off. It's a good bet that's how that queenpost disappeared.

Apparently, the DL&W was cheap, and wouldn't spend the money on either.

Dennis Storzek