GATX 56608


Jack Mullen
 

This photo in Ted Culotta's ebay sale caught my eye:


http://www.ebay.com/itm/General-American-GATX-56608-Pennsylvania-Tank-Car-Co-tank-car-8x10-photo-/371360722997


The striking feature is that the dome is the same diameter as the tank. I can't recall ever seeing one like this before.


The GATX listing in the 7-1950 ORER doesn't provide much useful detail, but this car is in a large block of 50-ton class TM cars, 55000-59599. From what I can see in the photo, the car seems to be a 10,000 gal ARA III with heater pipes. Nothing out of the ordinary except that huge dome.  I'd estimate that the dome volume is at least 5% of the tank. The steam-era expansion space requirement I'm aware of is 2%, and I can't think of a commodity that would be handled in an ARA III or ICC-103 that would require anything dramatically different.


Does anyone know more?


Jack Mullen


Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote :

This photo in Ted Culotta's ebay sale caught my eye:


http://www.ebay.com/itm/General-American-GATX-56608-Pennsylvania-Tank-Car-Co-tank-car-8x10-photo-/371360722997


The striking feature is that the dome is the same diameter as the tank. I can't recall ever seeing one like this before.

===========


Jack,


This is General American's stealth hot tub car, which could be discretely switched to a customer's plant for partying with the executives. The extra large dome supports a removable cover that hides the hot tub.


Dennis Storzek


Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 6/26/2015 7:41 AM, destorzek@... [STMFC] wrote:


The striking feature is that the dome is the same diameter as the tank. I can't recall ever seeing one like this before.

    They had a wreaked tank end and didn't know what to do with it?

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Dennis Storzek
 

Oops! I confused GATX 5... with GATX 1..., which is the stealth hot tub car... THIS car is the experimental car developed for transporting that American classic, Old Frothnslosh Beer, the beer that is all head and no body. The oversize dome was intended to contain the copious amounts of foam produced when the beer is shaken in transit.

Some of you may remember a beer whose slogan was "It's the water." The slogan that best applies to Frothnslosh is, "It IS water!"

Sorry guys, it's Friday, and grinding mold inserts is boring...

Dennis (Guinness drinker) Storzek


 

I thought that Fothingslosh¹s distinction was that the foam was on the
bottom?

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List
<STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Friday, June 26, 2015 at 10:29 AM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: GATX 56608







Oops! I confused GATX 5... with GATX 1..., which is the stealth hot tub
car... THIS car is the experimental car developed for transporting that
American classic, Old Frothnslosh Beer, the beer that is all head and no
body. The oversize dome was intended to contain the copious amounts of foam
produced when the beer is shaken in transit.

Some of you may remember a beer whose slogan was "It's the water." The
slogan that best applies to Frothnslosh is, "It IS water!"

Sorry guys, it's Friday, and grinding mold inserts is boring...

Dennis (Guinness drinker) Storzek








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Jack Mullen
 

Indeed, Old Frothingslosh was "The pale stale ale with the foam on the bottom."   But before the moderator locks us up in a cell with no Guinness, I'll just say that a lot of adult beverages crossed the border in STMFCs during Prohibition, especially Windsor-Detroit, and there are at least rumors that the traffic included beer in tanks.  Unlikely that any cars were designed for that service, though.

Jack Mullen


Tony Thompson
 

Jack Mullen wrote:

 

Indeed, Old Frothingslosh was "The pale stale ale with the foam on the bottom."   But before the moderator locks us up in a cell with no Guinness, I'll just say that a lot of adult beverages crossed the border in STMFCs during Prohibition, especially Windsor-Detroit . . .


      Actually a good freight traffic story. The smugglers arranged suitable "payments" to the officials involved, and thus created "in transit" paperwork indicating that carloads of distilled beverages, legally produced in Canada, were traveling under seal to Mexico. The Mexican officials, for a suitable reward, endorsed all papers as indicating that the cargoes had arrived there. The paperwork was then complete! But of course few if any cargoes really went to Mexico. Eventually the feds figured out the scheme and were able to stop it.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Armand Premo
 

Yes,even in milk cans.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 26, 2015 1:24 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: GATX 56608

 

Jack Mullen wrote:

 

Indeed, Old Frothingslosh was "The pale stale ale with the foam on the bottom."   But before the moderator locks us up in a cell with no Guinness, I'll just say that a lot of adult beverages crossed the border in STMFCs during Prohibition, especially Windsor-Detroit . . .


      Actually a good freight traffic story. The smugglers arranged suitable "payments" to the officials involved, and thus created "in transit" paperwork indicating that carloads of distilled beverages, legally produced in Canada, were traveling under seal to Mexico. The Mexican officials, for a suitable reward, endorsed all papers as indicating that the cargoes had arrived there. The paperwork was then complete! But of course few if any cargoes really went to Mexico. Eventually the feds figured out the sche me and were able to stop it.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signature press.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




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Ian Cranstone
 

On 2015-06-26, at 12:59 AM, jack.f.mullen@... [STMFC] wrote:

 
This photo in Ted Culotta's ebay sale caught my eye:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/General-American-GATX-56608-Pennsylvania-Tank-Car-Co-tank-car-8x10-photo-/371360722997

The striking feature is that the dome is the same diameter as the tank. I can't recall ever seeing one like this before.

The GATX listing in the 7-1950 ORER doesn't provide much useful detail, but this car is in a large block of 50-ton class TM cars, 55000-59599. From what I can see in the photo, the car seems to be a 10,000 gal ARA III with heater pipes. Nothing out of the ordinary except that huge dome.  I'd estimate that the dome volume is at least 5% of the tank. The steam-era expansion space requirement I'm aware of is 2%, and I can't think of a commodity that would be handled in an ARA III or ICC-103 that would require anything dramatically different.

The domes on these cars were absolutely huge, at 746 gallons (which works out to about 7.3% on these 10100 gallon cars), and it does look as if a regular tank car end was applied instead of a regular dome.  I have no idea as to what sort of commodity would have benefitted from these massive domes.

However, it looks as if these cars were most likely built this way.  

These cars were not listed in the 8/1919 Tank Car Capacities volume, suggesting that they were built between 1919 and 1927 (when the ICC-103 replaced the ARA-III for new construction) -- close examination of the photo suggests a built date of 12/1921.

The 6/1936 Tank Car Capacities volume lists the Pennsylvania Tank Line's PTX 5618-5917 with these oversize domes (there weren't quite 300 cars, as there were a few regular cars mixed into this group).  

By the 9/1955 Tank Car Capacities volume, these cars had been transferred to GATX 56534-56808 -- about 1937 the Pennsylvania Tank Line fleet was transferred to General American, and it would appear that these cars were eventually renumbered, as the PTX reporting mark was noted as being eliminated in the 4/1957 Official Railway Equipment Register.

Many were still listed in the 11/1970 Tank Car Capacities volume.

Some of these cars went on to yet another identity: at least 7 found their way to Canadian General Transit (a GATX subsidiary), being renumbered CGTX 1386 & 1387 in 1947, and with 1023, 1081, 1109, 1119 & 1510 following about 1963, with this second group apparently as replacement cars in extant series, just renumbered into the gaps.  A few of these cars survived into the early 1970s.  I have a photo of CGTX 1081 taken during the early- to mid-1960s, with most of the others appearing in the 11/1970 Tank Car Capacities volume.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada


Jack Mullen
 

Ian,

Thanks very much for your detailed response. I'm afraid that the purpose of the huge dome will remain unknown, unless someone gets lucky and finds an article about them in the trade press. I've tried searching RME 1921 and '22, without result.  

I found that PTL published a book titled "The Tank Car" in 1921, which might be helpful, or at least of general interest. I haven't found a copy in either the online secondhand book markets, or as an electronic copy.

Jack Mullen