"Dauphin" trucks...


Jeff Ford
 

Group,

From the "Needle in a Haystack" Department:

Has anyone ever heard of Dauphin trucks?  Are any photos available?  I get the impression that they may be for heavy duty service.  To clarify, they are two-axle trucks.  The earliest Helium tank cars (3 large tanks) rode on such trucks.  

Thank you,
-Jeff Ford
Sanger, TX


Charles Peck
 

Bowser offered Dolphin tender trucks. I think they were under some Bowser  PRR tenders. 
Chuck Peck

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 1:08 PM, Jeff Ford sectioncar@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Group,


From the "Needle in a Haystack" Department:

Has anyone ever heard of Dauphin trucks?  Are any photos available?  I get the impression that they may be for heavy duty service.  To clarify, they are two-axle trucks.  The earliest Helium tank cars (3 large tanks) rode on such trucks.  

Thank you,
-Jeff Ford
Sanger, TX



Misc Clark
 

yep - Dolphin trucks - they're under some PRR tenders...
Clark Cone

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 1:47 PM, Charles Peck lnnrr152@gmail.com [STMFC] <
STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Bowser offered Dolphin tender trucks. I think they were under some Bowser
PRR tenders.
Chuck Peck

On Wed, Jul 1, 2015 at 1:08 PM, Jeff Ford sectioncar@gmail.com [STMFC] <
STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Group,

From the "Needle in a Haystack" Department:

Has anyone ever heard of Dauphin trucks? Are any photos available? I
get the impression that they may be for heavy duty service. To clarify,
they are two-axle trucks. The earliest Helium tank cars (3 large
tanks) rode on such trucks.

Thank you,
-Jeff Ford
Sanger, TX


Jeff Ford
 

Thanks fellas.  I was puzzled by the spelling; no wonder I couldn't find anything.  In my defense, the original document from the Bureau of Mines spelled it "Dauphin."  Which causes me to wonder which way is actually right.  Surely it wasn't misspelled on porpoise...

-Jeff


Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 7/6/2015 1:00 AM, Jeff Ford sectioncar@... [STMFC] wrote:
spelled it "Dauphin."

    It's a name for the almost king of France in the early days.  A Penn thing and as below;

The Dauphin of France (French: Dauphin de France, IPA: [dofɛ̃])—strictly The Dauphin of Viennois (Dauphin de Viennois)—was the title given to the heir apparent to the throne of France from 1350 to 1791 and 1824 to 1830. The word is French for dolphin, as a reference to the depiction of the animal on their coat of arms.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
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