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Spencer Kellogg & Sons tank car

Steve Salotti
 

Hello,


I'm in the research stages of a clinic and am trying to find out about the above companies tank car fleet in 1949.  I have the reprint 1953 car owner registry book (OK, the correct name escapes me at the moment and I'm not at home) which does not list Spencer Kellogg at all.  There in a Spencer Chemical Company, but their owned cars do not come at all close to the cars I have at home in number series.  They do show in a register from 1917 but again totally different cars types and numbers.  The cars I have  are from Athearn (bogus, I know), plus several of the cars that I believe were made by Intermountain or Branchline numbered in the low 200.


Does anyone have a book pre 1949 that lists Spencer Kellogg and if so what type car and what number series were the cars.  Spencer Kellogg had plants in both Buffalo and Edgewater New Jersey and were a large producer of Linseed and other oils.



Ed Hawkins
 

On Jul 24, 2015, at 12:09 PM, salotti.steve@... [STMFC] wrote:

Does anyone have a book pre 1949 that lists Spencer Kellogg and if so
what type car and what number series were the cars.  Spencer Kellogg
had plants in both Buffalo and Edgewater New Jersey and were a large
producer of Linseed and other oils.
Steve,
Is a list for Jan. 1948 an OK list or would you prefer an earlier date?

For Spencer Kellogg SKX reporting marks, in Jan. 1948 they were listed
under GATC. The only cars listed is 5-361, 16 cars, all 30-tons.

In 1937 ACF built two orders for SKX having build dates of 2-37.

Lot 1645, 358-361, 4 cars, single comp't 8,000 gal. ICC-103, listed as
40-ton cars.
Lot 1646, 352-357, 6 cars, three comp't, 6,000 gal., ICC-103, listed as
40-ton cars.

Spencer Kellogg also leased some tank cars from ACF around this time.

Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 7/24/2015 11:09 AM, salotti.steve@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Hello,


I'm in the research stages of a clinic and am trying to find out about the above companies tank car fleet in 1949.  I have the reprint 1953 car owner registry book (OK, the correct name escapes me at the moment and I'm not at home) which does not list Spencer Kellogg at all.  There in a Spencer Chemical Company, but their owned cars do not come at all close to the cars I have at home in number series.  They do show in a register from 1917 but again totally different cars types and numbers.  The cars I have  are from Athearn (bogus, I know), plus several of the cars that I believe were made by Intermountain or Branchline numbered in the low 200.


Does anyone have a book pre 1949 that lists Spencer Kellogg and if so what type car and what number series were the cars.  Spencer Kellogg had plants in both Buffalo and Edgewater New Jersey and were a large producer of Linseed and other oils.


Steve,   

As Ed Hawkins noted in his reply to you, Spencer Kellogg and Sons was leasing their fleet in 1949. Ed gave the reporting marks as GATC. I think this is a typo, as I have a slide of GATX18919 taken in July 1960 (I think). As best as I can determine the entire fleet was sold during WWII, presumably all to GATX, as the company was still growing at that time. I have prints and/or photocopies of SKX361 (single dome AC&F Type 27 car built in 1937), SKX352 (triple dome AC&F Type 27 also built 1937), SKX231 (single dome car, build date about 1925), SKX131 (single dome car build date about 1923), SKX245 (three dome car converted from single dome car, original build date 1928), SKX211 (single dome car, build date about 1924), and SKX65 (10,000 gal. MCB Class II car built 1907, photo in Al Westerfield collection).

I also have photocopies of several ORERs from 1903 up to Jan. 1943, which suggests the fleet was sold in 1943 or 1944. The roster reported in 1943 (if I counted correctly) was 146 cars. The capacities were from 6,000 gals. to 10,000 gals (45,000 to 75,000 pounds).

Incidentally SK&S had 8 processing plants, Bellevue, Ohio; Buffalo, NY; Chicago, Illinois; Decatur, Illinois; Des Moines, Iowa; Edgewater, NJ; Long Beach, California; and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Each site had elevators, and there were also elevators in Superior, Wisconsin. Aerial photos of Chicago, Minneapolis, and Bellevue show tank cars on sidings. Early record indicate that tank cars were assigned to Buffalo, Edgewater, and Minneapolis. There is a small booklet titled "Laboratory Letters," written by Dr. Alexander Schwarcman, chief chemist for the company. The Fourth Edition, sometimes found on eBay and published in 1949 is the most comprehensive. It mostly deals with the products and their chemistry, but it does contain some information about the company's history.

I would be interested in getting a copy of your clinic material, when it is complete.

Spen Kellogg


al_brown03
 

Where'd they ship to? (Florida?)


Best,


Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 7/24/2015 8:11 PM, abrown@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Where'd they ship to? (Florida?)


All over the country. Spencer Kellogg and Sons was one of the largest producers of linseed oil, the basis of paint for the first half of the 20th century. They also produced tung oil, and coconut oil products, livestock feed, and even castor oil. Anything vegetable in a liquid form came out of SK&S plants.  Listed on the New York Stock Exchange, and acquired by Textron in 1961.

Spen Kellogg

Gerry Fitzgerald
 

While I have no specific information about tank cars I do have some brief corporate history background. At the moment I am doing a World War I history project that deals with Spencer Kellogg And Sons Inc. -albeit rather tangentially- and as such I have been looking into the early years of the firm. One of the nations’ leaders in linseed oil production, the firm had a number of mills built especially for the bulk production of linseed oil and the company dates in one form or another to 1824 although really begins in April of 1894. The first plant in Buffalo, which dates to the mid-1890s was the largest flaxseed-crushing plant in the country at the time of construction and was joined by another facility in Minneapolis in 1907 and in Edgewater NJ in 1909. The New Jersey plant was built in part to receive flaxseed and castor bean shipments from overseas, especially India and Brazil. The overall corporate history is really quite intriguing especially as it became more of an international player.

 

In seems that in 1949 the Minneapolis plant could produce approximately 7 tank cars per day which might be a useful ball park figure for those interested in fleet building or planning op sessions. I do not have data on any of the other plants.

 

In addition…One of the earlier posting mentioned possible links or over lap with the Spencer Chemical Co.. While I am not familiar with every chemical company in the United States there was a Spencer Chemical Co out in Kansas City area, which was NOT related in any way to Spencer Kellogg as far as I can ascertain. Spencer Chemical Co was involved in part with the analysis of the coatings of ammonium nitrate crystals and was looking into various approaches for fertilizer production and explosives conversion. Spencer Chemical Co grew out of an earlier concern, the Military Chemical Works, Inc, which apparently was looking into both explosives and fertilizers. These latter two firms date back to the early postwar period say 1946/47.

 

Best,

 

Gerard

 

Gerard J. Fitzgerald

Charlottesville, Virginia

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 7/26/2015 1:38 PM, gfitzgerald111@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

While I have no specific information about tank cars I do have some brief corporate history background. At the moment I am doing a World War I history project that deals with Spencer Kellogg And Sons Inc. -albeit rather tangentially- and as such I have been looking into the early years of the firm. One of the nations’ leaders in linseed oil production, the firm had a number of mills built especially for the bulk production of linseed oil and the company dates in one form or another to 1824 although really begins in April of 1894. The first plant in Buffalo, which dates to the mid-1890s was the largest flaxseed-crushing plant in the country at the time of construction and was joined by another facility in Minneapolis in 1907 and in Edgewater NJ in 1909. The New Jersey plant was built in part to receive flaxseed and castor bean shipments from overseas, especially India and Brazil. The overall corporate history is really quite intriguing especially as it became more of an international player.

 In seems that in 1949 the Minneapolis plant could produce approximately 7 tank cars per day which might be a useful ball park figure for those interested in fleet building or planning op sessions. I do not have data on any of the other plants.

 In addition…One of the earlier posting mentioned possible links or over lap with the Spencer Chemical Co.. While I am not familiar with every chemical company in the United States there was a Spencer Chemical Co out in Kansas City area, which was NOT related in any way to Spencer Kellogg as far as I can ascertain. Spencer Chemical Co was involved in part with the analysis of the coatings of ammonium nitrate crystals and was looking into various approaches for fertilizer production and explosives conversion. Spencer Chemical Co grew out of an earlier concern, the Military Chemical Works, Inc, which apparently was looking into both explosives and fertilizers. These latter two firms date back to the early postwar period say 1946/47.

To add to that during the period between WWI and WWII the company had warehouses in Rosario, Argentina (flax seed shipments I believe) and plants in Manila, Philippines (coconut oil and copra) and Hankow, China ((tung oil). A fleet of five 10,000 ton tankers brought shipments to Edgewater, NJ and Long Beach, Ca for processing and shipment by rail (mandatory STMFC content).

And, no, SK&S had no connection to Spencer Chemical Co.

Spen Kellogg