Milk trains and cars


rdietrichson
 

Hi all,

I recently saw some articles on milk trains in the east and upper mid-west, but there was no mention of milk transportation on the west coast.  How was milk handled in the southwest and CA?

Rick Dietrichson

Wilmington, NC


Tom Vanwormer
 

Rick,
The Espee had a couple of Milk & Cream cars (Baggage Car) service to both Los Angeles and San Francisco.  These cars were carried in scheduled passenger trains as needed.  The products were carried in five and ten gallon milk cans with the empty cans moving in the reverse direction on passenger trains under waybill to expedite their return.

Between 1877 and 1918 the Colorado Midland moved milk cans from the farms along the route to processing facilities in Colorado Springs, Leadville, Aspen, Glenwood Springs and Grand Junction as waybilled items of express.  The milk cans were expedited from the processing facilities back to the farmer on the next train.  Similar cans were used to transport fish for stocking the rivers and lakes along the line from the State Hatchery in Leadville.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

Rdietrichson@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Hi all,

I recently saw some articles on milk trains in the east and upper mid-west, but there was no mention of milk transportation on the west coast.  How was milk handled in the southwest and CA?

Rick Dietrichson

Wilmington, NC



Tony Thompson
 

I recently saw some articles on milk trains in the east and upper mid-west, but there was no mention of milk transportation on the west coast.  How was milk handled in the southwest and CA?


     As Tom VanWormer said, SP operated milk service into both San Francisco and Los Angeles for some years. In the 1930s, the LA service from the west extended as far as Oxnard. I have seen a memo setting aside a certain number of express reefers for that service and for cut flowers, though SP also used baggage cars for short milk movements. The Sacramento Northern carried milk into East Bay points from Walnut Creek and Concord until just after World War II.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





drgwrail
 

Back about 30 years ago Bob Mohowski and I did a 3 part article series in Railroad Model Craftsman on milk cars and trains.

We did extensive research on milk cars and  trains on milk cars. While a few railroads outside of the northeast listed a few milk cars, we found no evidence of the volume and devoted trains it is pretty certainn that the solid trains existed only in the Notheast. The huge volume and distances required for the New York City market simply did not exist elsewhere.

The LV, DL&W, Erie, NYOW, etc shipped milk in carloads from as far as 200 miles from NYC. Milk was shpped in alss lined tanks in cars, bottled, ready for home delivery , cans, etc. The milk companies such as Bordens, Dairylea, etc. had a large network of creameries though out NY and eastern PA.
As Tony says, other places simply shipped milk cans in baggage cars. Boston and PhiliCelpia had carload lots shipped but seem to have had no solid trains.
l
A very interesting subject with much to be yet researched!

Chuck Yungkurth
Lousville CO


Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Chuck and List Members,
 
Chuck, I remember the RMC series you did very well, a great research piece and very inspirational at the time.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2015 8:16 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Milk trains and cars

Back about 30 years ago Bob Mohowski and I did a 3 part article series in Railroad Model Craftsman on milk cars and trains.

We did extensive research on milk cars and  trains on milk cars. While a few railroads outside of the northeast listed a few milk cars, we found no evidence of the volume and devoted trains it is pretty certainn that the solid trains existed only in the Notheast. The huge volume and distances required for the New York City market simply did not exist elsewhere.

The LV, DL&W, Erie, NYOW, etc shipped milk in carloads from as far as 200 miles from NYC. Milk was shpped in alss lined tanks in cars, bottled, ready for home delivery , cans, etc. The milk companies such as Bordens, Dairylea, etc. had a large network of creameries though out NY and eastern PA.
As Tony says, other places simply shipped milk cans in baggage cars. Boston and PhiliCelpia had carload lots shipped but seem to have had no solid trains.
l
A very interesting subject with much to be yet researched!

Chuck Yungkurth
Lousville CO


riverman_vt@...
 

    You are mistaken in thinking that New England had no straight milk trains, Chuck, 
as I'm sure Bob Mohowski will agree if you ask him. He still has as much interest in 
the subject as I do and we speak about it relatively often. While I would agree that 
the cities in the Northeast, from Boston south to Philadelphia had a lot more milk
traffic by rail that other areas Chicago must still be considered as well. Both Borden
and Bowman Dairy were two large shippers in the Chicago milk shed and there were]
a numbe rof smaller firns. The chief difference here seems to be that most of the
Chicago milk companies switched to truck, almost 100%, much earlier the we in
the Northeast did.

     For those interested we still have the North American Milk Train Association group
at Yahoo. You can find it easily with a Google search for "NAMTA Yahoo Group". We 
do not have a lot of posts. What you will find is people with serious interest in the
subject rather than idle chit chat. Ten years ago I put together three annual Milk Car
Meets here in Vermont all of which were attended by from 40 to 50 folks. One was 
tried in the Utica, NY area for those interested in milk moved over the NYC, D&H, 
your favorite NYO&W and the Erie but there simply wasn't much interest in that area
so it did not come about.

Cordially, Don Valentine
 


Brian Termunde
 

Well I for one, was very disappointed! Only because it meant that I couldn't any of those really cool milk cars on my model railroad!  : <

Seriously, it was a great series, and I learned a lot, so a sincerely, if belated, Thank You!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT
 
"My Train of Thought left the station without me!"


-----Original Message-----

3a. Re: Milk trains and cars
    Posted by: "Claus Schlund HGM" claus@... clausschlund
    Date: Sat Aug 1, 2015 9:01 am ((PDT))

Hi Chuck and List Members,

Chuck, I remember the RMC series you did very well, a great research piece and very inspirational at the time.

Claus Schlund


Bruce Smith
 

Regarding Chicago milk traffic, one of my favorite shots from Ed DeRouin’s book Pennsy In Chicago  is of a PRR T1 (4-4-4-4 duplex) pulling what appears to be a National Car Co milk flat car with 2 detachable milk containers… most likely leased to Bordens.  The photo was taken in Englewood, Il.  Page 49 for those who are interested.  Btw, the book is now available through the PRRT&HS eStore after the PRRT&HS purchased the remaining copies.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Aug 1, 2015, at 9:26 PM, riverman_vt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

While I would agree that 
the cities in the Northeast, from Boston south to Philadelphia had a lot more milk
traffic by rail that other areas Chicago must still be considered as well. Both Borden
and Bowman Dairy were two large shippers in the Chicago milk shed and there were]
a numbe rof smaller firns. The chief difference here seems to be that most of the
Chicago milk companies switched to truck, almost 100%, much earlier the we in
the Northeast did.