Resin Car Works new kit


Eric Hansmann
 

Resin Car Works announces a new kit to kick off their Scene Setters line focused on once common elements that weren't far from the tracks. These simple kits can enhance a scene on your model railroad. The first Scene Setter kit represents an iconic Midwest structure, a round corrugated metal grain bin.

The prototypes began with a government grain storage program in the 1930s and thousands of these grain bins were installed in towns across the Midwest.

The Resin Car Works HO scale model is a one piece resin casting and will only need to be painted before it is set into a scene on your railroad. Four grain bins are included for only $36, plus postage and handling. Check out completed model photographs and review the kit instructions on our website.

 http://resincarworks.com/scene.htm

 

Resin Car Works has several of the acid tank car kits in stock, but supplies are getting very low. A new freight car kit is also nearing completion. We hope to share more news very soon on this exciting HO scale model.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Resin Car Works web guy

 


mrprksr <mrprksr@...>
 

Evenin' Eric....Quick Question on the new metal grain bins....from a non-farmer.....how was grain loaded into bin and how was in taken out....Thanks....Larry



On Friday, November 6, 2015 4:44 PM, "'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Resin Car Works announces a new kit to kick off their Scene Setters line focused on once common elements that weren't far from the tracks. These simple kits can enhance a scene on your model railroad. The first Scene Setter kit represents an iconic Midwest structure, a round corrugated metal grain bin.
The prototypes began with a government grain storage program in the 1930s and thousands of these grain bins were installed in towns across the Midwest .
The Resin Car Works HO scale model is a one piece resin casting and will only need to be painted before it is set into a scene on your railroad. Four grain bins are included for only $36, plus postage and handling. Check out completed model photographs and review the kit instructions on our website.
 
Resin Car Works has several of the acid tank car kits in stock, but supplies are getting very low. A new freight car kit is also nearing completion. We hope to share more news very soon on this exciting HO scale model.
 
 
Eric Hansmann
Resin Car Works web guy
 



Douglas Harding
 

Larry, I’m not Eric, but I live in farm country and know a little about grain bins. The grain was put into the bin via a corn elevator, or in later years, a grain auger.

Here’s a photo of a corn elevator in use http://grabauheritage.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Elevator-deposits-corn-in-Opening-in-Corn-Crib.jpg

And here is an auger http://www.griggsdakota.com/2010/10/corn-in-bin.html

Either piece of equipment has a hopper at the bottom in which the corn is dropped from truck or wagon, then lifted up to the top of the bin.

Elevators were displaced by augers as farmers began shelling their corn as they harvested. Combines shell corn as it is harvested.

 

Removal was via a door or opening either in the side of the bin, or a pit with auger at the bottom of the bin.

Here is a photo of a Butler bin with door http://hubpages.com/food/How-to-Disassemble-a-Grain-Bin-Picture-Tutorial#slide3576046

In early years grain was shoveled out by hand, often into the hopper of the elevator or auger, placed near the door, and into a waiting truck or wagon. Later bins had a pit or trough built into the concrete base, with an auger installed for use in emptying the bin. https://anewthingdaily.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/augerout.jpg

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


destorzek@...
 

I am going to add, because Doug's first picture reminded me, that un-shelled corn (still on the cob) requires different storage, likely because of different moisture content. When corn kept for animal feed was left on the cob in earlier times (pre 1960, maybe?) it was stored in structures with a roof to keep the rain off, but lots of ventilation. Doug's first pic is the traditional corn crib, rectangular with slatted sides, These could be different shapes, often the two side walls of a wider structure were five or six foot wide cribs, leaving an open pull-through bay in the center for machinery storage. http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/baylor-old-corn-crib-weathered-wood-provides-shelter-to-vintage-hay-baler-38957351.jpg

 



The more modern version looked pretty much like the RCW grain bin, but with the corrugated sides replaced with heavy wire mesh, similar to concrete reinforcing mesh, with about four inch openings. http://www.dailyencouragement.net/images/amish/corn_crib2.jpg

 



Here in Illinois concrete block corn cribs were pretty common, they were typically two cylinders built of special shaped blocks with the cores oriented to provide openings through the walls, covered with a shingled roof that spanned an equipment bay between the cylinders. http://realneo.us/system/files/corn+crib+elevator+prefab.jpg

 



After corn pickers became combines that shelled the corn as it was picked, the Butler style bins became ubiquitous. Can anyone put a better date on when this transition took place?

Dennis Storzek


Douglas Harding
 

Dennis trying to pinpoint a date is difficult, as a number of different developments play a part.

 

The first Gleaner combine was built in 1923. It was the first self-propelled machine designed for harvesting grain, combining reaping, binding and threshing all into one machine. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleaner_Manufacturing_Company The built their first corn combine in 1929 http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe50s/machines_13.html

 

John Deere built their first corn head combine in 1954 and stopped manufacturing their corn shellers in the late 50’s due to combines with corn heads.

 

The first Butler steel grain bins were built in 1907 http://www.butlermfg.com/about_us The government grain storage program of 1938/9 really propelled the growth of steel grain bins. You could find rows of them across rural America, where farmers could rent them for grain storage.

 

Iowan Henry Wallace developed a hybrid corn and started Pioneer Seed Corn in 1926, which increased corn yields from 33 bushels an acre in the 30’s to an avg of 127 today. Farmers in northern Iowa now typically harvest 180-200+ bushels an acre of corn.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


mrprksr <mrprksr@...>
 

Thank You very much for all the info....I plan on using a few on my layout and needed help in completeing the scene.....Larry Mennie



On Friday, November 6, 2015 11:46 PM, "'Douglas Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Dennis trying to pinpoint a date is difficult, as a number of different developments play a part.
 
The first Gleaner combine was built in 1923. It was the first self-propelled machine designed for harvesting grain, combining reaping, binding and threshing all into one machine. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleaner_Manufacturing_Company The built their first corn combine in 1929 http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe50s/machines_13.html
 
John Deere built their first corn head combine in 1954 and stopped manufacturing their corn shellers in the late 50’s due to combines with corn heads.
 
The first Butler steel grain bins were built in 1907 http://www.butlermfg.com/about_us The government grain storage program of 1938/9 really propelled the growth of steel grain bins. You could find rows of them across rural America, where farmers could rent them for grain storage.
 
Iowan Henry Wallace developed a hybrid corn and started Pioneer Seed Corn in 1926, which increased corn yields from 33 bushels an acre in the 30’s to an avg of 127 today. Farmers in northern Iowa now typically harvest 180-200+ bushels an acre of corn.
 
Doug Harding
 



Clark Propst
 

I’ll add that the ‘Government bins’ would be in rows near rural communities. When I was young I could tell when we were near a town when we’d pass group of those small grain bins.
Clark Propst0
Mason City Iowa


Eric Hansmann
 

Doug,

Thank you very much for sharing the background and historical details on the
machinery that moved grain into the grain bins.

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX
Resin Car Works web guy

On November 6, 2015 at 9:46 PM "'Douglas Harding'
doug.harding@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:


Dennis trying to pinpoint a date is difficult, as a number of different
developments play a part.



The first Gleaner combine was built in 1923. It was the first self-propelled
machine designed for harvesting grain, combining reaping, binding and
threshing all into one machine.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleaner_Manufacturing_Company The built their
first corn combine in 1929
http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe50s/machines_13.html



John Deere built their first corn head combine in 1954 and stopped
manufacturing their corn shellers in the late 50's due to combines with corn
heads.



The first Butler steel grain bins were built in 1907
http://www.butlermfg.com/about_us The government grain storage program of
1938/9 really propelled the growth of steel grain bins. You could find rows
of them across rural America, where farmers could rent them for grain
storage.



Iowan Henry Wallace developed a hybrid corn and started Pioneer Seed Corn in
1926, which increased corn yields from 33 bushels an acre in the 30's to an
avg of 127 today. Farmers in northern Iowa now typically harvest 180-200+
bushels an acre of corn.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <doug.harding@...> wrote :

John Deere built their first corn head combine in 1954 and stopped manufacturing their corn shellers in the late 50’s due to combines with corn heads.

===============


Thanks Doug. That would seem to put the end point on the traditional corn crib, although some held on for years, until the farmer's older equipment wore out and was replaced. I still see the wire basket type occasionally, empty and long abandoned.


I should point out that none of this limits the usefulness of the RCW Butler type bin, even in corn country, they were used earlier to store other grains used as feed, such as oats.


Dennis Storzek


destorzek@...
 


Phillip Blancher <pblancher@...>
 

Butler also manufactured railroad buildings. The Rutland Railway received a Butler kit in Malone, New York, for a two-stall enginehouse in 1956. Nearly 60 years later it is still in use, long after the Rutland was gone. This is on my to-do list for my layout and I have been emailing back and forth with Butler which still has in their archives the original plans for the building and even contract paperwork for it with the Rutland.

Phil



Bill Welch
 

The catch I think Dennis is that because Butler is still in business will they permission?

Bill Welch


destorzek@...
 

They'd probably be thrilled.

Dennis


 

I doubt that a 1/87 scale, solid plastic version competes with their product. 

Thanks!
Brian Ehni 
(Sent from my iPhone)

On Nov 7, 2015, at 2:49 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

They'd probably be thrilled.

Dennis


Douglas Harding
 

Dennis I recall seeing the wood slat corn crib and wire bins in use well up into the 70’s, ie well past the cut off date of the STMFC list. Combines were/are expensive. Many farmers, esp those with smaller farms, stayed with the two row tractor mounted corn picker. These pickers did not shell the ear, leaving it intact, and required cribs for storage and drying. Most ear corn was fed to hogs, ie it never left the farm. Corn intended for export was shelled. As farms got larger, feed lots and chicken houses consolidated and expanded creating demand for ground corn for feed, and farmers quit raising livestock (all by the mid 70’s), then we see a wholescale transition to combines and shelled corn.

 

If interested in how steel grain bins are constructed, here is a link to the reverse, ie dismantling a bin http://hubpages.com/food/How-to-Disassemble-a-Grain-Bin-Picture-Tutorial

And a video on how to assemble a bin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Muk97Nx0NME

 

Butler had several different logos and styles of lettering through the years. There is an oval with lettering inside. There is a lettering consisting of just the word Butler that is flat at the bottom and forms an arch at the top. And large block lettering flat top and bottom. I have seen lettering in either red or black paint. And the modern Butler logo is the oval in blue.

 

Here is a Butler bin ad from 1924 http://www.ebay.com/itm/1924-BUTLER-GRAIN-BIN-GRANARY-AD-CORN-KANSAS-CITY-MINNEAPOLIS-/331107791748

Note the ad lists Kansas City and Minneapolis as locations for the Butler company. In 1939 the company manufactured bins in Galesburg ILL. So Midwest boxcars would be appropriate freight cars for hauling Butler grain bin parts.

 

Columbia Valley Model at one time made a kit for HO Butler bins. The roof was a bunch of white metal castings, which would make a great scene for unloading a boxcar or erecting a grain bin. I haven’t seen any of these kits for some time. The Rix plastic bin is much larger. Hopefully the Resin Car Works kit is the

 

Now for the all-important steam era freight car information: I have a photo of NKP 12147 double sheathed door and half wood boxcar, being unloaded of steel grain bin parts. The photo is dated 1939 and shows two men unloading and piles of parts laid on the ground. If may have come from the LOC photo collection. Number on the negative side is 28854-D

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Bill Welch
 

Tell that to the UP, it is about corporate identity, not steel vs. tiny resin buildings

Bill Welch


Mike Fortney
 

RCW shows deft wisdom by sidestepping the potential name licensing issue completely. Who needs that kind of aggravation?

Mike Fortney


Clark Propst
 

Thinking of decals, I some some bins today with BROCK on them  ;  ))
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Douglas Harding
 

While Butler was a major player in metal grain bins, there were many other brands. Here are a few I recall seeing in Iowa or have read about.

 

Butler – started 1907 in Clay Center, Kansas

Sioux – started in 1918, based in Sioux Falls, South Dakota

Chief – started 1961 in Kearney, Nebraska

MFS (Modern Farm Systems) – 1970 or earlier, Webster City, Iowa

Sukup – started in 1962 in Sheffield, Iowa

Brock --  started in 1957 in Milford, Indiana

Superior – in Kindred, North Dakota

Stormor – Fremont, Nebraska

York – started in 1970 in York, Nebraska

Wheeling Corrugating Co. – 1930s or 40s Kansas City Missouri

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <doug.harding@...> wrote :

Here is a Butler bin ad from 1924 http://www.ebay.com/itm/1924-BUTLER-GRAIN-BIN-GRANARY-AD-CORN-KANSAS-CITY-MINNEAPOLIS-/331107791748

Note the ad lists Kansas City and Minneapolis as locations for the Butler company. In 1939 the company manufactured bins in Galesburg ILL. So Midwest boxcars would be appropriate freight cars for hauling Butler grain bin parts.

=================

Interesting story here about the Galesburg plant.