Hairspray for peeling paint Galvanized Paneled Roofs


Andy Carlson
 

I have seen some terrific examples of peeling paint techniques on youtube. A brief description of the method.


Paint the model with a base cost which is the desired color you wish to have exposed through the final coat of color. Use the cheapest hairspray was the recommendation and spray the areas which you wish to have distressed. After its dry (won't take long) apply the car's final finish color. After a longer wait, use a fiberglass brush and/or a knife point to pick at the painted surface. Chunks of the car's color will flake off exposing the underneath color. You can control how much rust/primer/base color one wishes to expose by how much picking one does. Follow up with a good clear finish coat.

The effect is remarkable in its realism.

Bill Welch- this was gleaned from one of your references to military modeling years ago after a game of "youtube roullette", one of my favorite pastimes!
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Curt Fortenberry
 


Agree, lots of techniques out there.  I find that for my purposes, I use pieces of makeup sponge (as in lady's makeup), and then just dab the underlying color on top of the color coat.  Kinda like the chipping effect that plastic modelers use.  Vallejo makes a chipping medium that in process is similar to the salt or hairspray technique.  Years ago, in the Gazette, articles by Greenberg and Nash, they used rubber cement didn't they?

Curt Fortenberry


Richard Townsend
 

As I recall there an article in Mainline Modeler a long time ago that used oat bran as a resist. The effect was excellent. It involved a cover story on a FW&D yard office, but I don't recall the date.
 
Lower in sodium and higher in fiber.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: curtfortenberry@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Dec 17, 2015 11:35 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Hairspray for peeling paint Galvanized Paneled Roofs

 

Agree, lots of techniques out there.  I find that for my purposes, I use pieces of makeup sponge (as in lady's makeup), and then just dab the underlying color on top of the color coat.  Kinda like the chipping effect that plastic modelers use.  Vallejo makes a chipping medium that in process is similar to the salt or hairspray technique.  Years ago, in the Gazette, articles by Greenberg and Nash, they used rubber cement didn't they?

Curt Fortenberry


Richard Townsend
 

I see on ebay it was Dec 1993.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Townsend richtownsend@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Dec 17, 2015 12:17 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Hairspray for peeling paint Galvanized Paneled Roofs

 
As I recall there an article in Mainline Modeler a long time ago that used oat bran as a resist. The effect was excellent. It involved a cover story on a FW&D yard office, but I don't recall the date.
 
Lower in sodium and higher in fiber.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: curtfortenberry@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Dec 17, 2015 11:35 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Hairspray for peeling paint Galvanized Paneled Roofs

 

Agree, lots of techniques out there.  I find that for my purposes, I use pieces of makeup sponge (as in lady's makeup), and then just dab the underlying color on top of the color coat.  Kinda like the chipping effect that plastic modelers use.  Vallejo makes a chipping medium that in process is similar to the salt or hairspray technique.  Years ago, in the Gazette, articles by Greenberg and Nash, they used rubber cement didn't they?

Curt Fortenberry


tyesac@...
 

I've had success using Dupo rubber cement in small dabs over a undercoat of "old silver" followed by a final overcoat of the color coat.    Extended drying times between coatings is key to good results, as is sparing/thin applications of the rubber cement.
 
Tom Casey 
As I recall there an article in Mainline Modeler a long time ago that used oat bran as a resist. The effect was excellent. It involved a cover story on a FW&D yard office, but I don't recall the date.
 
Lower in sodium and higher in fiber.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: curtfortenberry@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Dec 17, 2015 11:35 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Hairspray for peeling paint Galvanized Paneled Roofs

 

Agree, lots of techniques out there.  I find that for my purposes, I use pieces of makeup sponge (as in lady's makeup), and then just dab the underlying color on top of the color coat.  Kinda like the chipping effect that plastic modelers use.  Vallejo makes a chipping medium that in process is similar to the salt or hairspray technique.  Years ago, in the Gazette, articles by Greenberg and Nash, they used rubber cement didn't they?

Curt Fortenberry
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Townsend richtownsend@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Dec 17, 2015 2:17 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Hairspray for peeling paint Galvanized Paneled Roofs

 
As I recall there an article in Mainline Modeler a long time ago that used oat bran as a resist. The effect was excellent. It involved a cover story on a FW&D yard office, but I don't recall the date.
 
Lower in sodium and higher in fiber.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: curtfortenberry@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Dec 17, 2015 11:35 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Hairspray for peeling paint Galvanized Paneled Roofs

 

Agree, lots of techniques out there.  I find that for my purposes, I use pieces of makeup sponge (as in lady's makeup), and then just dab the underlying color on top of the color coat.  Kinda like the chipping effect that plastic modelers use.  Vallejo makes a chipping medium that in process is similar to the salt or hairspray technique.  Years ago, in the Gazette, articles by Greenberg and Nash, they used rubber cement didn't they?

Curt Fortenberry


mwbauers
 

Bugs will love the oat bran !!!

The hard core weathering method is to use table salt on top of the undercoat, final paint, then rub to release the covered salt..

Any salt if scattered in the process won’t feed nor attract any ‘wild-life’.

I’ll bet that much the same effect as using oat bran can be achieved by using coarse ground salt like a canning salt. That will notch up the table salt effect with no possibly edible side result of the indoor environment.

Between the finer effect of table salt and the coarser effect of canning salt, I think you’ll have the range of weathering effects you long for.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Dec 17, 2015, at 2:17 PM, Richard Townsend  wrote:


As I recall there an article in Mainline Modeler a long time ago that used oat bran as a resist. The effect was excellent. It involved a cover story on a FW&D yard office, but I don't recall the date.
 
Lower in sodium and higher in fiber.
 
-----Original Message-----
From: curtfortenberry

 

Agree, lots of techniques out there.  I find that for my purposes, I use pieces of makeup sponge (as in lady's makeup), and then ….


Bill Welch
 

One of the modelers I have corresponded with said he has had the best results w/Kosher salt although he did not know why so I purchased some Morton's "Coarse Kosher Salt."

I have used a "Mask-It" product similar to rubber cement in the past. At the time I liked the result but in retrospect as I look at the models it looks like a flock of incontinent pigeons flew over the model. The contours of the margins of the galvanized areas look too smooth and the exposed galvanized area look too much like water spots. I am seeking a more irregular or jagged appearance.

I was not enthusiastic about the Hair Spray method until Andy mentioned using a Fiber Glass Brush to scratch the paint. It seems like this would also produce a jagged appearance. Since I have several IM roofs I will experiment with that also.

As too Brian's comment, although good shots high enough to see the roofs are very rare, I do have several photos showing the edges of roof where there is paint and no paint. Among my 500 or so models I have maybe 2-3 models with this effect. I have not done it in about 15 years so I decided with new knowledge and materials, I want to do it again on a couple of current builds if the experiments are promising.

Over on the Resin Builders Yahoo Group people have been very kind about the photo on my weathered wood running board so I am going to write an RCW Blog item on modeling a wood running board and the Rock Salt and now the Hair Spray methods to model peeling paint.

Bill Welch


gtws00
 

I just posted a photo of my 1st attempt at using the salt method on a 40 ft Milwaukee Road Ribside car. I painted the roof aluminum, let dry over night. I Misted with water and sprinkled on the Sea Salt, let dry about 60 minutes and top coated with Model Master Oxide Red acrylic. I waited for 2 hours for it to dry and then used a flat brush about 3/16 inch wide with short bristles to brush off the salt. I found that I needed to dip the tip of the brush in water to help wash some of it off. Just a small amount of water was needed.This method is similar to what Ted Culotta used in his recent  Prototype Railroad Profile Number 2 from Speedwich Media.
 
George Toman