Gravel Pit Operation near Plainfield Illinois


roy wojahn
 

The freight cars shown on this site may not be steam era, but they appear beat up enough to be close.  Try;


picasaweb.google.com/109517272707102411928/MaterialService


thank you Bill Barber for the location.


Roy Wojahn



Jim Betz
 

  That is clearly not in Illinois ... I suggest somewhere in South America ... Jim B.


roy wojahn
 

The shots were taken in the 50's or 60's at a Material Service quarry near Plainfield, Illinois.  They are part of a collection inherited by the son of the photographer.  If the son says its Illinois, I'll take his word.  While the Whitcomb diesel shown may look strange to the USA eye, they were somewhat common on USA shortlines.  

Roy


water.kresse@...
 

I could not get the link to work.  Is that the quarry on the Burlington line west of Chicago? Al Kresse


From: "zuch2rew@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, December 19, 2015 4:04:09 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Gravel Pit Operation near Plainfield Illinois

 

The shots were taken in the 50's or 60's at a Material Service quarry near Plainfield, Illinois.  They are part of a collection inherited by the son of the photographer.  If the son says its Illinois, I'll take his word.  While the Whitcomb diesel shown may look strange to the USA eye, they were somewhat common on USA shortlines.  


Roy



roy wojahn
 

No, the connection was to the EJ&E.


On Saturday, December 19, 2015 1:06 PM, "water.kresse@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I could not get the link to work.  Is that the quarry on the Burlington line west of Chicago? Al Kresse


From: "zuch2rew@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, December 19, 2015 4:04:09 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Gravel Pit Operation near Plainfield Illinois

 
The shots were taken in the 50's or 60's at a Material Service quarry near Plainfield, Illinois.  They are part of a collection inherited by the son of the photographer.  If the son says its Illinois, I'll take his word.  While the Whitcomb diesel shown may look strange to the USA eye, they were somewhat common on USA shortlines.  

Roy




Douglas Harding
 

Al there was an error in the link as first posted on the CBQ list. Try this: https://picasaweb.google.com/109517272707102411928/MaterialService

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


mwbauers
 

Thank you for posting the link.

That engine happens to be my favorite narrow gauge body, even if it was also found with standard gauge trucks. It appeared in The ‘Gazette’ as a scale drawing of a 60-ton 30-inch gauge mining company diesel ages ago. That diesel model was spread all over the world in volume as a WW-II lend-lease and military locomotive on quite different gauges of foreign railroads.

Those are great detail shots of the locomotive.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Dec 19, 2015, at 7:07 PM, 'Douglas Harding' wrote:


Al there was an error in the link as first posted on the CBQ list. Try this: https://picasaweb.google.com/109517272707102411928/MaterialService


paul.doggett2472@...
 

Doug.
Whilst i cannot throw any light on the locomotive manufacturer. Is it not ex USATC i seem to remember photos of very similar locos in USATC service.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"'Douglas Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Al there was an error in the link as first posted on the CBQ list. Try this: https://picasaweb.google.com/109517272707102411928/MaterialService

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Doug,

These locomotives were built by Whitcomb locomotive works to a unique design. They are all 65-ton machines of model DE-14A or DE-19A and variants built for the U.S. Army. Many served overseas. Following the war, most still in the U.S. were sold off, usuallly to industrial firms, though a few went to work for common-carrier railroads. Here's the Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geo_D._Whitcomb_Company .

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 12/20/15 5:47 AM, paul.doggett2472@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
Doug.
Whilst i cannot throw any light on the locomotive manufacturer. Is it not ex USATC i seem to remember photos of very similar locos in USATC service.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"'Douglas Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC]" wrote:
 

Al there was an error in the link as first posted on the CBQ list. Try this: https://picasaweb.google.com/109517272707102411928/MaterialService

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 



Jim Betz
 

Hi,

I should have 'studied the pics longer'. The cars with no markings
fooled me into thinking this was not in the U.S. And the lack of any
'defining' details we typically see on RRs here in the U.S. But, upon
further study I found stuff like crossing signals, one car with a
reporting mark, hard hats on the workers, etc.
This turns out to be a company RR that is "off the grid". And, since
the photos appear to be from the early 70's there was very little
evidence of OSHA and other such governmental influences. They
probably had a link to a mainline RR some where ... but I'm guessing
that it was one of those that are "thru a chain link fence gate".

Those cars are -very- unique. Stuff like those big wheels that
operate the doors is uncommon. And then there is the overall
condition of the cars - totally functional ... but also very beat up!
And how about that part of the track that ran thru that swamp!
Too bad these are photos and not videos - I bet those trains were
"rocking and rolling".
- Jim B.


destorzek@...
 

I can't put my finger on the origin of the cars, but they are REALLY old early steel ore cars, some look like from the Summers Steel Car Co., undoubtedly purchased second hand. The large door operating wheel looks homemade. The railroad here was for internal haulage only, from the pit to the washer; these cars obviously never left the property.

I seem to recall this operation closed down in the early sixties; this was one of the potential sites investigated by the Illinois Railway Museum when they were looking to move from their initial home in North Chicago. This site wasn't chosen, and they ended up moving to Union, IL.

Dennis Storzek


Douglas Harding
 

The gravel pit photos were first linked on the CBQ list in response to this quest by Leo Philips: Near Plainfield, IL I noticed clear signs of former rail Spurs to the now flooded pits along Rte 126,Renwick road and Rte 30. Clearly these pits were served by the "J". The 1945 and '56 "J" employee TT's show a station .75 miles east of Plainfield named Gravel Pit with capacity of 119 cars. This would place the station southeast of Plainfield. There are, to this day, clear signs of of a North/ South spur crossing Renwick road just east of Rte 30. There are numerous signs of Spurs on both sides of rte 126 east of Plainfield of more Spurs. My gut says these were dug to supply Chicago gravel for cement, etc but would love to have more information about who operated the pits, when, where did the gravel go,etc,etc,etc.

 

To which Bill Barber responded: I believe the operation that you are talking about belonged to Material Service Corp. My late father apparently had some interest in this line and photographed it on two occasions. This link to one album on my Picasa web page provides the photos that he took at that time. https://picasaweb.google.com/109517272707102411928/MaterialService (Link corrected) I do not know exactly when he took the photos, but I believe that it was in the 1970s. I tried to find a map of the Material Service system, but have been unsuccessful. Somewhere, I did find that apparently, MS had two operations in the area. One was closer to Joliet and the other is this one near Plainfield. As I recall, at one time, you could see glimpses of the RR from I-55 close to where IL 126 exits. The last six photos in the album pertain to another site. I believe it was a coal fired power plant near Joliet, but an not certain. I have no idea what my dad’s interest in this line was, but he was a model railroader and may have used the photos for a presentation to an NMRA group.

 

Then someone shared the link on this list, with no explanation or reference to location.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

My recollection as an interested child growing up in that area is that Material Service Corp. had a number of unconnected industrial railroad operations, most of which were for the numerous limestone quarries around the same part of the southwestern Chicago area, and the color scheme of the USA Whitcomb center cab was and is a familiar one. These very same quarries, many of which were gigantic, were also served by swarms of small tank engines that spiraled down along ledges to the bottom with short cuts of side dumps, where steam shovels awaited to load them for the return trip up. This all disappeared shortly after WWII in favor of trucks.

Of side bar interest, Material Service Corp. was controlled by the Crown family, who also were the controlling stockholders of the Rock Island RR, the latter right up to abandonment, if memory serves (it often does not….). I believe that the Rock may have in fact served some of the quarries out toward or beyond Joliet.

Others closer at hand in Chicago can probably comment more authoritatively.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento CA