P2K 10K tank car replacement railing


O Fenton Wells
 

Does anyone have a replacement handrail for a P2K 10K gal tank car or who has them to sell?  I couldn't find them at Walthers.  Or suggestions for making a replacement.

Thanks in advance

Fenton Wells




al_brown03
 

Hi Fenton,


I don't know of a source for replacement handrails made specifically for the P2K tank. But in general, I find that plastic tank-car handrails (like plastic sill steps) don't long survive contact with my three left elbows and two right thumbs. In my hands, wire handrails are far more durable. To replace the P2K handrail you'll need handrails and joiners and stanchions. Precision Scale #32110 stanchions are beautiful; for handrails, I've been using .015" OD phosphor-bronze wire (PB holds its shape better than brass), joined with .016" ID plastic tubing from smallparts.com. Tony Thompson points out that my handrail is really too light: should be .019" OD. I don't know of a source of .019" PB wire, but Tichy supplies .020"; if I can find .021" ID tubing, I'll try it. The stanchions will need to be drilled to accept wire that large.


Ted Culotta uses a related technique, described in one of his RMC articles: joins handrails with *steel* tubing, cut with a cut-off disc in a Dremel tool. (If the tube is steel it needn't fit quite so tightly on the handrail.) I lack Ted's skill with a Dremel, have tried it and failed. Others think it isn't a big deal, though.


YMMV --


Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Al, and by the way I was inspired by your tank car clinic in Cocoa this year.  I'll give it a try.  I have some .19 from Detail associates i think

On Thu, Mar 3, 2016 at 8:21 PM, abrown@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi Fenton,


I don't know of a source for replacement handrails made specifically for the P2K tank. But in general, I find that plastic tank-car handrails (like plastic sill steps) don't long survive contact with my three left elbows and two right thumbs. In my hands, wire handrails are far more durable. To replace the P2K handrail you'll need handrails and joiners and stanchions. Precision Scale #32110 stanchions are beautiful; for handrails, I've been using .015" OD phosphor-bronze wire (PB holds its shape better than brass), joined with .016" ID plastic tubing from smallparts.com. Tony Thompson points out that my handrail is really too light: should be .019" OD. I don't know of a source of .019" PB wire, but Tichy supplies .020"; if I can find .021" ID tubing, I'll try it. The stanchions will need to be drilled to accept wire that large.


Ted Culotta uses a related technique, described in one of his RMC articles: joins handrails with *steel* tubing, cut with a cut-off disc in a Dremel tool. (If the tube is steel it needn't fit quite so tightly on the handrail.) I lack Ted's skill with a Dremel, have tried it and failed. Others think it isn't a big deal, though.


YMMV --


Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Tony Thompson
 

Fenton Wells wrote:

 
Thanks Al, and by the way I was inspired by your tank car clinic in Cocoa this year.  I'll give it a try.  I have some .19 from Detail associates i think

   I agree with Al Brown's recommendation. I use the DA brass wire, which is indeed 0.019 inches.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Bob Christensen
 

I saw this conversation and remembered something I learned from airplane modelers.  The .019 Detail Associates wire fits inside the .8mm tubing made by Albion Alloys.  I just tested it out.  You can cut the tubing to length using a scalpel.  You place the tubing on a hard surface  and roll it back and forth a few times at the spot where you want to cut it.  Then just snap it off and it breaks clean.  I tried it and was amazed I could get usable pieces less than 2mm long.
Bob Christensen


Michael Gross
 

This is a helpful alternative, as I have been unable to find smallparts.com (an alternative source of small-I.D. tubing) on the web.  It has apparently been absorbed—devoured?—by Amazon.

As it has been a useful site for small modeling parts, I would appreciate knowing if other modelers have been able to locate the site recently.

Many thanks!


Mark Stamm
 

On Mar 4, 2016, at 9:48 AM, Michael Gross ActorMichaelGross@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

This is a helpful alternative, as I have been unable to find smallparts.com (an alternative source of small-I.D. tubing) on the web.  It has apparently been absorbed—devoured?—by Amazon.


As it has been a useful site for small modeling parts, I would appreciate knowing if other modelers have been able to locate the site recently.

Many thanks!


Michael Mang
 

A search on amazon.com returned "Shop Small Parts Store". That takes you to their complete inventory. While not as easy to navigate as the old smallparts.com site, I was able to go through and find the small size screws and nuts I had bought in the past.

Michael Mang


On Fri, Mar 4, 2016 at 12:47 PM Michael Gross ActorMichaelGross@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

This is a helpful alternative, as I have been unable to find smallparts.com (an alternative source of small-I.D. tubing) on the web.  It has apparently been absorbed—devoured?—by Amazon.


As it has been a useful site for small modeling parts, I would appreciate knowing if other modelers have been able to locate the site recently.

Many thanks!




Tim O'Connor
 

Michael

This is the product recommended by Tom Madden

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000FN5QME

Tim O'Connor

-----------------------------------------

This is a helpful alternative, as I have been unable to find smallparts.com (an alternative source of small-I.D. tubing) on the web.  It has apparently been absorbed�devoured?�by Amazon.

As it has been a useful site for small modeling parts, I would appreciate knowing if other modelers have been able to locate the site recently.

Many thanks!

Michael Gross


Michael Gross
 

Thanks to all for your helpful information.

Cheers!