Shipping Bricks


Tony Thompson
 

Elden Gatwood wrote:

 

The steel industry and foundries all over the country used vast quantities of refractory (oven bricks). Since they were valuable, they were usually shipped on pallets bound in place with metal banding, but in your time perhaps rope. They could be any color, but the ones I saw were a very dark red/black, slightly metallic color.


     Both in steelmaking and other industries using refractory brick, there are numerous kinds, and they all have different looks. Silica brick can be gray to almost golden, chrome brick can be dark gray to dark brown, magnesia brick are various light colors depending on composition, and so on. I'm not saying Elden is wrong in what he says, only that there is a great deal more to the topic if you wish to depict pallets of such brick.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <tony@...> wrote :
     Both in steelmaking and other industries using refractory brick, there are numerous kinds, and they all have different looks.
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And the pertinent point for modelers is they all came from different places. Same with architectural face brick. While common brick was chosen strictly on cost, and tended to be locally produced, to the point where all the buildings in a large city tended to have the same color brick,  face brick was chosen for color and/or texture, and was shipped longer distances; if white brick was desired, it had to come from an area that had clean white clay; other colors were similar. Being a premium product, it warranted the extra expense in handling, at one time being loaded by hand and the layers packed with straw or other padding.

Dennis Storzek






Schuyler Larrabee
 

 

Not all brick color is dependent on the color of the clay.  I know that Hanley brick from Pennsylvania was a glazed brick, though not a particularly glossy finish.  The basic brick color was a slightly greenish gray, but there were many colors of brick available, as the face would be glazed with a variety of materials.  This is a great advantage if renovating an existing building as the color of the brick could be reliably matched.  One building I designed developed severe leaks in the exterior walls.  Fortunately for the architect and owner the mason acknowledged that the problem was entirely his responsibility.  To fix it involved removing five or six courses above all the ribbon windows on three floors and replacing them with new brick.  The brick was Hanley brick and when complete, there was no evidence that the bricks had been replace, the color match was that good.

 

The mason nearly went under because of the expense, but later on prospered because he gained a reputation of standing behind his work.

 

Schuyler


---In STMFC@..., <tony@...> wrote :

     Both in steelmaking and other industries using refractory brick, there are numerous kinds, and they all have different looks.
===========

And the pertinent point for modelers is they all came from different places. Same with architectural face brick. While common brick was chosen strictly on cost, and tended to be locally produced, to the point where all the buildings in a large city tended to have the same color brick,  face brick was chosen for color and/or texture, and was shipped longer distances; if white brick was desired, it had to come from an area that had clean white clay; other colors were similar. Being a premium product, it warranted the extra expense in handling, at one time being loaded by hand and the layers packed with straw or other padding.

Dennis Storzek