Smaller Files


Bill Welch
 

I would like to find a set of smaller foles than these if such tools are available. Can anyone tell me a source please?

Small Files.JPG

Thank you!

Bill Welch


Charles Peck
 

There might be something of interest here.


Regards, Chuck Peck (usually in FL but summering in Maine)

On Wed, Jul 27, 2016 at 6:28 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I would like to find a set of smaller foles than these if such tools are available. Can anyone tell me a source please?

Small Files.JPG

Small Files.JPG
Shared with Dropbox
Preview by Yahoo

Thank you!

Bill Welch



Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Wow! That’s a bewildering array of files to choose from. Looking at sets, I don’t know where to start in terms of degree of coarseness or fineness. What works best for dressing plastic and resin? What works best for removing material? Maybe Jack will share with us the files he uses most for various purposes.



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 6:26 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Smaller Files





There might be something of interest here.



http://www.ottofrei.com/Store/Files/



Regards, Chuck Peck (usually in FL but summering in Maine)



On Wed, Jul 27, 2016 at 6:28 PM, fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com <mailto:fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com> [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com> > wrote:



I would like to find a set of smaller foles than these if such tools are available. Can anyone tell me a source please?

Small Files.JPG <https://www.dropbox.com/s/2to725q85zcqcfl/Small%20Files.JPG?dl=0>



<https://www.dropbox.com/s/2to725q85zcqcfl/Small%20Files.JPG?dl=0>

<https://www.dropbox.com/s/2to725q85zcqcfl/Small%20Files.JPG?dl=0> Small Files.JPG

Shared with Dropbox




<https://www.dropbox.com/s/2to725q85zcqcfl/Small%20Files.JPG?dl=0> View on www.dropbox.com

Preview by Yahoo




Thank you!

Bill Welch







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Dennis Storzek
 

I happen to like diamond files... and these are small:

Gesswein Diamond Poli Files – Medium

They act like 150 grit sandpaper that never wears out. For modelwork I find the style "A" in different widths most useful. They used to have a plastic collet chuck type handle for these, but I can't find it... however the 3mm shanks should fit in the 1/8" collet of a pin vise.



Also these, which are larger, but finer grit, maybe too fine for working plastics.

Spectra Diamond Micro Files

 


Dennis Storzek



Andy Carlson
 

Years ago, Jimi Booth's boss at PBL (the Sn3 guys) sold me a resistant soldering unit and a flat diamond faced file, with one smooth thin edge. Both tools have earned my faith in good tools and I am glad that I don't have to get on without them. I like the file's single blind edge as it aids in working up to areas which need to be protected from any further abrasion.

Buy a diamond file and find it to be your go-to-file for almost every project.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "destorzek@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 7:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Smaller Files

 
I happen to like diamond files... and these are small:

Gesswein Diamond Poli Files – Medium

They act like 150 grit sandpaper that never wears out. For modelwork I find the style "A" in different widths most useful. They used to have a plastic collet chuck type handle for these, but I can't find it... however the 3mm shanks should fit in the 1/8" collet of a pin vise.



Also these, which are larger, but finer grit, maybe too fine for working plastics.

Spectra Diamond Micro Files
 

Dennis Storzek





Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

All diamond files aren’t created equal. I bought a set of diamond files from Micro Mark, only to find that they were inferior products from China. The flat file isn’t flat, etc. Lesson learned; never buy files from hobby suppliers.



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 9:17 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Smaller Files





Years ago, Jimi Booth's boss at PBL (the Sn3 guys) sold me a resistant soldering unit and a flat diamond faced file, with one smooth thin edge. Both tools have earned my faith in good tools and I am glad that I don't have to get on without them. I like the file's single blind edge as it aids in working up to areas which need to be protected from any further abrasion.



Buy a diamond file and find it to be your go-to-file for almost every project.

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA



_____

From: "destorzek@mchsi.com [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 7:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Smaller Files





I happen to like diamond files... and these are small:

Gesswein Diamond Poli Files – Medium <http://www.gesswein.com/p-6599-gesswein-diamond-poli-files-medium.aspx>

They act like 150 grit sandpaper that never wears out. For modelwork I find the style "A" in different widths most useful. They used to have a plastic collet chuck type handle for these, but I can't find it... however the 3mm shanks should fit in the 1/8" collet of a pin vise.



Also these, which are larger, but finer grit, maybe too fine for working plastics.

Spectra Diamond Micro Files <http://www.gesswein.com/p-9976-spectra-diamond-micro-files.aspx>




Dennis Storzek











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


WILLIAM PARDIE
 


Back in the dark ages (my early model railroading days)  Brookstone was a tool supplier and not a mall store selling items of
questionable value.  I picked up many item from them including Oil Paper used to wrap tools in to retard oxidation.  The best item, however, was a set of Micro Files.  There ws a square file and a round file.  The overall length was about two and a half inches and the file portion one and three quarters.  This ws regretfuly before i learned that when I found an item tht I liked andactually worked to buy several.  About the same time (late 60's -early 70's)  Model Rairoader had an article in which a gentleman made a working pump action handcar in HO.  HIs primary tool was micro files.  As I came across the article
in later years the referenced supplier in New England was long gone.

The rfound file is also long gone but th square file loves on isn is in frequent use today.  I have long searched for theae files.
Tool supliers at train shows don't know wha I am talking about.  Jewelry tool suppliers don't have them.  When I look up
Micro Files online I am spirited to sections on data storage.

I would love to get more of these files and hopefully someone who is a better detective than I might find them.

Bill Pardie

On Jul 27, 2016, at 12:28 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

I would like to find a set of smaller foles than these if such tools are available. Can anyone tell me a source please?

Small Files.JPG

Thank you!

Bill Welch




Tim O'Connor
 

About a zillion years ago there was a magazine article that mentioned
a file at a particular hardware store in Boulder Colorado. When I visited
the city I went to that store and got the file - absolutely my favorite
tool ever, I've used it for 20 years. perfectly flat, square edges, with
one blind slide like Andy's file - which I agree is a wonderful feature.
on a second visit to Boulder I bought an extra one just in case!

how good is it? it's hard enough to file steel, but gentle enough that I
can EASILY file down the rivets on an Athearn tank car body without any
gouges or scratches and leave the body perfectly smooth - it cuts that
Athearn plastic like butter.

Tim O'Connor

All diamond files aren’t created equal. I bought a set of diamond files from Micro Mark, only to find that they were inferior products from China. The flat file isn’t flat, etc. Lesson learned; never buy files from hobby suppliers.

Nelson Moyer

===============================================
Years ago, Jimi Booth's boss at PBL (the Sn3 guys) sold me a resistant soldering unit and a flat diamond faced file, with one smooth thin edge. Both tools have earned my faith in good tools and I am glad that I don't have to get on without them. I like the file's single blind edge as it aids in working up to areas which need to be protected from any further abrasion.

Buy a diamond file and find it to be your go-to-file for almost every project.

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA


mwbauers
 

I just now hunted.

The working terms are 'diamond file' .... I suggest either 'micro' or 'mini' go in front of that. You'll find lots of them this way.

Many of the 'micro' are more micro than you may expect. At that, some of those would be great as very fine files for exotic and very tiny filing.


Mike Bauers

On Jul 27, 2016, at 10:40 PM, "WILLIAM PARDIE PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

The rfound file is also long gone but th square file loves on isn is in frequent use today. I have long searched for theae files.
Tool supliers at train shows don't know wha I am talking about. Jewelry tool suppliers don't have them. When I look up
Micro Files online I am spirited to sections on data storage.

I would love to get more of these files and hopefully someone who is a better detective than I might find them.


Jim Betz
 

Dennis (and all),

These Gesswein files say they are for a reciprocating tool!

Is there a "modeler's sized" tool of this type? Is it something along the lines of a
Dremel tool in terms of size that accepts these files (and other inserts?). (The
only one I found on the Gesswein site STARTED at almost $1000 dollars. I'm
not likely to buy that one.)

Just this week I was modifying the pilot of a brass loco - using a file -
and was thinking to myself "wouldn't it be nice if I have a power tool
for this?".
- Jim B.


mark_landgraf
 

Gesswein caters to the jewelry manufacturer. Their pricing reflect that. However they are the only folks that I know of that have a reciprocating hand piece for filing. 

MSC company has sucked up many industrial supply houses over the year. J&L and Enco come to mind. This makes the one on the largest. Their catalog is 3 inches thick and is printed on very thin paper. Check their Web site for swiss needle files. 
mscdirect.com

Swiss needle files range from zero (course) to #4 (very fine) to #6 (extremely fine). They are also available in sizes up to at least 8 inches. They are expensive. Manufacturers include, Grobet, & Nicholson,
MSC is very easy to deal with. With a handful of warehouses, normal shipping is 1 to 2 days‎.  

Mark


Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the Verizon Wireless 4G LTE network.
From: jimbetz jimbetz@... [STMFC]
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 11:01 AM
To: STMFC@...
Reply To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Smaller Files

 

Dennis (and all),

These Gesswein files say they are for a reciprocating tool!

Is there a "modeler's sized" tool of this type? Is it something
along the lines of a
Dremel tool in terms of size that accepts these files (and other
inserts?). (The
only one I found on the Gesswein site STARTED at almost $1000 dollars. I'm
not likely to buy that one.)

Just this week I was modifying the pilot of a brass loco - using a file -
and was thinking to myself "wouldn't it be nice if I have a power tool
for this?".
- Jim B.



Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <mark_landgraf@...> wrote :

Gesswein caters to the jewelry manufacturer. Their pricing reflect that. However they are the only folks that I know of that have a reciprocating hand piece for filing.

======================

And mold polishing. The problem with reciprocating hand pieces, at least as far as mold polishing goes, is it needs a very short and precisely limited stroke. Mine strokes .012", IIRC. and was around $500. Adjustable stroke tools are made, and are more money. Then there's the ultrasound tools, micro stroke, macro bucks $$$.

But the diamond files work just fine by hand. Whsh I could remember where I bought the handles.

Dennis Storzek
 


qmp211
 

Rio Grande has 4" files and I have sourced many unusual tools from them, excellent suppplier
https://www.riogrande.com/search/go?w=micro+files

made for reciprocating handpiece but are short length diamond files
http://www.moldshoptools.com/catalog/list.php?category_id=152

Randy Danniel


Charles Peck
 

Do any of the powered toothbrushes have a reciprocating action?  I'm thinking most are rotary but perhaps
there is an exception.  Then make an adapter for the file shank.  Ought to ease getting the flash out from 
between stockcar slats. (required freightcar content to appease the sheriff).
Chuck Peck


On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 2:09 PM, milepost206@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Rio Grande has 4" files and I have sourced many unusual tools from them, excellent suppplier
https://www.riogrande.com/search/go?w=micro+files

made for reciprocating handpiece but are short length diamond files
http://www.moldshoptools.com/catalog/list.php?category_id=152

Randy Danniel



Jack Burgess
 

As I recall from one of Al’s resin kits, it is better to get rid of the flash by sanding the “inside” of the casting on a piece of fine emory paper lying on a flat surface. That way, the boards don’t get “narrower”.



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 3:18 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Smaller Files








Do any of the powered toothbrushes have a reciprocating action? I'm thinking most are rotary but perhaps

there is an exception. Then make an adapter for the file shank. Ought to ease getting the flash out from

between stockcar slats. (required freightcar content to appease the sheriff).

Chuck Peck





On Thu, Jul 28, 2016 at 2:09 PM, milepost206@mchsi.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Rio Grande has 4" files and I have sourced many unusual tools from them, excellent suppplier
https://www.riogrande.com/search/go?w=micro+files

made for reciprocating handpiece but are short length diamond files
http://www.moldshoptools.com/catalog/list.php?category_id=152

Randy Danniel












[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


midrly
 

I've been working on a few Westerfield stock cars.  I prefer to sand the sides a bit per Jack's method, then drag a scalpel blade BACKWARDS along the edges of the "boards".  The sharp edge of the back of the blade  defines and squares off the boards as well as cutting the flash off.  The same can be done with the back of an X-Acto no. 11 blade.

Steve Lucas


Tom Madden
 

Tim wrote:

> About a zillion years ago there was a magazine article that mentioned
> a file at a particular hardware store in Boulder Colorado. When I visited
> the city I went to that store and got the file - absolutely my favorite
> tool ever, I've used it for 20 years. perfectly flat, square edges, with
> one blind slide like Andy's file - which I agree is a wonderful feature.
> on a second visit to Boulder I bought an extra one just in case!
>
> how good is it? it's hard enough to file steel, but gentle enough that I
> can EASILY file down the rivets on an Athearn tank car body without any
> gouges or scratches and leave the body perfectly smooth - it cuts that
> Athearn plastic like butter.


Bob Schleicher, editor of RAIL MODEL JOURNAL, wrote the article. He lived in Boulder and touted that file. It's a Simonds 10" laminate file:

Gundlach No. 10-AP Simonds 10 All Purpose File : Floorz-N-More, Your Complete Flooring Needs Flooring|Tools|Supplies

I use it for rough cleanup of resin castings and am on my third one.


The hardware store is McGuckin's, which is right next to the hotel where Tim stayed. It's a fantastic hardware store, really worth visiting, but you can get those files elsewhere too.


Tom Madden


Andy Carlson
 

I would caution using a back side of a blade to scrape off flash on a resin stock car side. If you think about it, flash is an thickness extension of the resin part, rising above the area where the pattern ended. I simply sand down the sides carefully over plate glass until the flash just disappears. You will get uncompromised board edges and the boards will be true thickness.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "lucas@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 6:30 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Smaller Files

 
I've been working on a few Westerfield stock cars.  I prefer to sand the sides a bit per Jack's method, then drag a scalpel blade BACKWARDS along the edges of the "boards".  The sharp edge of the back of the blade  defines and squares off the boards as well as cutting the flash off.  The same can be done with the back of an X-Acto no. 11 blade.

Steve Lucas



A&Y Dave in MD
 

My favorite tool for this flash removal is the DuoSharp diamond bench stone that Jack Burgess mentioned (I think, I give him credit for many high quality tool recommendations due to his MRH column).

I have found sales and good prices in many locations but I compare to Amazon's prices as a benchmark: 

Dave
Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Jul 29, 2016, at 1:22 AM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I would caution using a back side of a blade to scrape off flash on a resin stock car side. If you think about it, flash is an thickness extension of the resin part, rising above the area where the pattern ended. I simply sand down the sides carefully over plate glass until the flash just disappears. You will get uncompromised board edges and the boards will be true thickness.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



From: "lucas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, July 28, 2016 6:30 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Smaller Files

 
I've been working on a few Westerfield stock cars.  I prefer to sand the sides a bit per Jack's method, then drag a scalpel blade BACKWARDS along the edges of the "boards".  The sharp edge of the back of the blade  defines and squares off the boards as well as cutting the flash off.  The same can be done with the back of an X-Acto no. 11 blade.

Steve Lucas



Dennis Storzek
 

A few more sources for smaller files, diamond files, and handles.

Someone sent me a link to a file handle on the Gesswein that appears to have a collet nut so should tighten nicely around the smooth shanks of the short diamond files made for the reciprocating tools:
Needle File Handle

 


I buy a lot of stuff from Plastic Process Equipment, here are their offerings for both needle files and diamond files, note they also have a clamp-on handle for two different size round shanks:
Plastic Process Equipment, Inc.

 

I don't know if that link will go directly to the page, but the files start on page 296.

Here is the small file handle I really like; PFERD #16174, available from multiple sources, but here's one with a pic:
http://www.toolfetch.com/pferd-16174-quick-mount-file-handle-sh-220-for-needle-diamond-and-small-files.html

Dennis Storzek