Weathered box cars


Eric Hansmann
 

Weathering tips have returned to the DesignBuildOp blog. Seven box cars have rolled out of the weathering factory and are ready for service. Check it out! 




Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX


Bill Welch
 

Eric, are your "washes" applied with a brush or an airbrush?

I really appreciate the variations, well done!

Bill Welch


Peter Hall
 

Outstanding weathering work, Eric!

For those of us interested, could you elaborate on how you do a “wash”?  Your weathering uses several washes, and it would be very useful to know how you do it.  The choices of paint, solvent, brush or airbrush, and technique are all subjects I’d be interested in knowing.

Many thanks
Pete





On Jul 29, 2016, at 9:24 AM, Eric Hansmann eric@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Weathering tips have returned to the DesignBuildOp blog. Seven box cars have rolled out of the weathering factory and are ready for service. Check it out! 




Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX



Eric Hansmann
 

Bill, 

I'm sorry to disappoint you but no airbrushes were used to weather these models. I can't recall how broad or long the brushes were for the wash applications. I'm away from home for a few days and can't peek around my work areas.  

Micro brushes were used to streak PanPastels. Sponges were used to apply broader PanPastel applications. 

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

On Jul 29, 2016, at 12:59 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Eric, are your "washes" applied with a brush or an airbrush?

I really appreciate the variations, well done!

Bill Welch


Tim O'Connor
 

Coarse dry brushes over a recent wash or wet brushes, both with pigments,
dry sponges, micro brushes (wet or dry), and sometimes just my finger...
whatever it takes. I like to mix it up. Also I find that doing less at one
time is better than trying to do it all at once. Some cars I have revisited
several times over a period of years.

To paraphrase Dory "just keep weathering"

Tim O'

I'm sorry to disappoint you but no airbrushes were used to weather these models. I can't recall how broad or long the brushes were for the wash applications. I'm away from home for a few days and can't peek around my work areas.

Micro brushes were used to streak PanPastels. Sponges were used to apply broader PanPastel applications.

Eric Hansmann


Chuck Cover
 

Great job Eric.  Could you explain what you use for route tags?  Do you just make them yourself?  Thanks

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM


Bob Chapman
 

Pete Hall writes:
 
For those of us interested, could you elaborate on how you do a “wash”? Your weathering uses several washes, and it would be very useful to know how you do it. The choices of paint, solvent, brush or airbrush, and technique are all subjects I’d be interested in knowing.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
 
Eric --
 
First -- great work, and thanks for posting it! I strive for diverse weathering in my freight car fleet, and your excellent technique is one more approach for me to try.
 
 
Your washes really look good, and I'd like to get mine right. I'll add a few questions to Pete's:   
 
1) Do you have a favorite acrylic brand?
 
2) Is there anything special that you use to dilute the acrylic to achieve a good wash? 
 
3) Approximately what is your dilution ratio? I know this isn't tight science, but I'd welcome any guidance.
 
 
Again, thanks!
Bob Chapman
 
   


Eric Hansmann
 

Pete and Bob,

Thanks for your comments on the weathering blogpost. I'm currently in rural western PA and have spotty cell service. I will post a detailed reply as soon as I can but it might be a couple of days. 

At least the B&LE rails are just across the road from the cabin getaway. 

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX


On Jul 31, 2016, at 1:32 PM, chapbob611@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Pete Hall writes:
 
For those of us interested, could you elaborate on how you do a “wash”? Your weathering uses several washes, and it would be very useful to know how you do it. The choices of paint, solvent, brush or airbrush, and technique are all subjects I’d be interested in knowing.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
 
Eric --
 
First -- great work, and thanks for posting it! I strive for diverse weathering in my freight car fleet, and your excellent technique is one more approach for me to try.
 
 
Your washes really look good, and I'd like to get mine right. I'll add a few questions to Pete's:   
 
1) Do you have a favorite acrylic brand?
 
2) Is there anything special that you use to dilute the acrylic to achieve a good wash? 
 
3) Approximately what is your dilution ratio? I know this isn't tight science, but I'd welcome any guidance.
 
 
Again, thanks!
Bob Chapman
 
   


Bill Welch
 

Bob:

I am not Eric and while not wishing to reveal too many points in my presentation at Collinsville next week I will say that I have been experimenting successfully with something called Airbrush Mediums that allow us to thin or reduce Acrylics without changing the chemistry of the paint. Here are two links from my handout. The mix ratio will the thing that each of us will want to experiment with.



I am mainly using Badger's Modelflex acrylic paint mainly but also experimenting w/Iwata's Com-Art line:

Bill Welch
 
 


Eric Hansmann
 

Chuck,

 

I use paper stock for the route cards and placards on the models. Plain newsprint is cut into narrow strips about four inches wide. Small squares are cut from the strip and these are carefully placed on a small dot of canopy glue that has been applied to the model with a toothpick. I also use Post-it note material that is a buff or yellow shade.

 

For the partial cards, place a single edge razor blade at an angle over a short section. Place the blade flat on the cutting surface and pull the narrow paper strip up to tear the paper and leave a partial piece under the blade. I’ve noticed a variety of partial cards spread across wood sheathed cars. I model 1926 and much of the box car fleet will be wood sheathed, so there will be many partial cards on my models.

 

These details were inspired by Tony Thompson’s great blog posts on these details. After reading his latest few posts, I feel I should mark some with numbers or letters before cutting them from the paper strips. Here’s his latest piece on the route cards.

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2016/07/route-cards-part-13-other-examples.html

 

These are very easy details to add to models. As Tony points out in a few of his posts, steel cars had a specific route card holder along the sill so the cards would be restricted to those placement spots.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 2:43 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Weathered box cars

 




Great job Eric.  Could you explain what you use for route tags?  Do you just make them yourself?  Thanks

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM