Westerfield stock car sanding


Gary Ray
 

Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,

 

I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars.  I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.

 

Do you glue the grit down to the glass?  What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting?  Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)?  Grade of sandpaper?

 

Any and all help greatly appreciated.  I do not want to ruin another set of sides.

 

Thanks,

Gary Ray


Bill Welch
 

Yes sandpaper needs to be secured to glass, spray adhesive handy for this. As I do this I make sure to rotate the casting so the sanding goes as evenly as possible. Go SLOWLY and check often using firm finger pressure. Did I already say check often. I would not use anything courser than 340 Grit, 400 is a good choice I think.

I accidentally broke my glass recently, a scrap .5 inches thick. I had had 20 years.

Bill Welch


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Nothing I can add to Bill’s summary. I have a couple of pieces of plate glass with the edges ground. They give a nice level surface for things like this plus soldering together white metal trucks…



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 12:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding








Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,



I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars. I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.



Do you glue the grit down to the glass? What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting? Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)? Grade of sandpaper?



Any and all help greatly appreciated. I do not want to ruin another set of sides.



Thanks,

Gary Ray


Bruce Smith
 

Let me add, go slow and PAY ATTENTION. I managed to sand through a board on a resin NP car from Aaron Gjermundson with a few careless strokes. Of course, when I get back to that kit, the salvage is going to be to patch the bard with a fresh board to make it look like a repair in transit!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Jul 29, 2016, at 4:05 PM, STMFC@... wrote:

Nothing I can add to Bill’s summary. I have a couple of pieces of plate glass with the edges ground. They give a nice level surface for things like this plus soldering together white metal trucks…



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 12:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding







Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,



I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars. I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.



Do you glue the grit down to the glass? What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting? Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)? Grade of sandpaper?



Any and all help greatly appreciated. I do not want to ruin another set of sides.



Thanks,

Gary Ray


Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Gary, I’ve built 24 of the flat kit Sunshine SM-18 stock cars, and after the first attempt as sanding where I damaged two slats, I changed course. As an aside, you can fix a few damaged slats with Evergreen styrene HO scale lumber matched to the board size of the slats. Be sure to use course sandpaper to approximate the wood grain of the original castings. When the car is painted, you can’t find the replaced boards. Now, for my method. I use a single edge razor blade to trim around the edges of the sides, and a #11 X-acto blade to remove the flash from the slats, working slowly and carefully to avoid knife damage to the slats. After the slats are clear, I run the point of the blade along the top and bottom of each slat to remove any residual flash. Then, and only then, do I lightly sand the backs of the sides to remove any residual plastic fuzz. I inspect the sides in good light for any remaining flash. I haven’t built a Westerfield stock car yet, though I have a RI kit in the stash.



I have a 14 x 18 piece of smooth tile (think counter top material) that perfectly flat. I tape three half sheets of sandpaper to the tile, 100, 220, and 400 grit. I start with the 100 and work down to 400. I try to keep an even pressure on the part, though with a large part like a side, I don’t have enough fingers. Avoid too much finger pressure as you slide the part on the sandpaper, and move you hand position to keep the back side as even as possible. I bought a diamond sharpening stone from Woodcraft upon Jack Burgess’ recommendation, and I use it for squaring car parts, but I finished all my stock cars before I got it so I can’t comment about sanding slats.



Bottom line is minimal downward pressure and mostly horizontal movement – let the sandpaper do the work as the part slides lightly across the surface. Use slow long strokes rather than rapid short strokes. Good luck.



Nelson Moyer



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 2:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding





Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,



I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars. I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.



Do you glue the grit down to the glass? What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting? Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)? Grade of sandpaper?



Any and all help greatly appreciated. I do not want to ruin another set of sides.



Thanks,

Gary Ray





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


tyesac@...
 

Gary,

I've used either a piece of granite tile or thick piece of plate glass as the flattening surface.  As for the abrasive, I have a few grades  (200 thru 400) of automotive wet/dry paper to do the cutting,  I haven't found the need to glue it down first.  As for maintaining an even result, I apply pressure to one or two panels at a time and check my progress frequently.  Rotating the piece also helps even out any possible "wedging" due to inconsistent hand motion.   As soon as the flash is tissue paper thin, a tip of an Exacto #11 blade has an easy time of cleaning out what remains. 

I learned the hard way about sanding to far, I have a Sunshine Santa Fe  Sk-U that has several random slats that are now replaced by Evergreen 2" x 6" strip.  

 I've also noticed that the doors are way more delicate than the sides are.  

Tom Casey   
I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars.  I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.
 
Do you glue the grit down to the glass?  What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting?  Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)?  Grade of sandpaper?
 
Any and all help greatly appreciated.  I do not want to ruin another set of sides.
 
Thanks,
Gary Ray



-----Original Message-----
From: 'Gary Ray' gerber1926@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Fri, Jul 29, 2016 2:56 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding

 
Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,
 
I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars.  I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.
 
Do you glue the grit down to the glass?  What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting?  Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)?  Grade of sandpaper?
 
Any and all help greatly appreciated.  I do not want to ruin another set of sides.
 
Thanks,
Gary Ray


riverman_vt@...
 

   Thank you Tom. I was just about to ask why folks had not tried a piece of polished
granite rather than glass. Unless one has a good source for really thick glass and a
way to have the edges polished to avoid any sharpness it would seem that a usable 
piece of granite should be fairly easy to find at most any reputable building supply
business these days give the demand for granite counter tops.

Cordially, Don Valentine


frograbbit602
 

I sand as Bill and Jack suggested on plate glass holding the casting with my fingers. I want to add that I count the strokes sanding in one direction ( say ten ). I stop and rotate the casting 180 degrees. Now I count the sanding strokes until I have the same number of strokes ( ten ) as I had in the other direction. I continue to repeat this method, matching sanding strokes in each direction, until the flash between slats disappears. I believe counting the strokes in each direction helps to account for the difference in pressure my fingers and thumb may have on the casting when holding it. I find keeping the sanding strokes in each direction the same helps me to keep all areas of the casting back as even as possible.
Lester Breuer


william darnaby
 

I have also experienced this frustration as it is impossible to apply uniform pressure with one's fingers.  In a tile store where grout supplies are also sold I found a very stiff sponge measuring about 2 x 4 x 6 made for working grout in between the tiles.  When turned on edge it has enough "give" to nestle between the braces and other side details so it applies much more uniform pressure to the side when pushed down with your hand.  I am able to quickly sand down the backs of the sides and ends using 150 grit paper on a flat surface.  Yes, you will remove bits of the sponge with the paper but that is a minor annoyance compared to sanding through a slat.

Bill Darnaby



From: "Lester Breuer frograbbit602@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 10:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Westerfield stock car sanding

I sand as Bill and Jack suggested on plate glass holding the casting with my fingers.  I want to add that I count the strokes sanding in one direction ( say ten ).  I stop and rotate the casting 180 degrees.  Now I count the sanding strokes until I have the  same number of strokes ( ten ) as I had in the other direction.  I continue to repeat this method, matching sanding strokes in each direction, until the flash between slats disappears.  I believe counting the strokes in each direction helps to account for the difference in pressure my fingers and thumb may have on the casting when holding it.  I find keeping the sanding strokes in each direction the same helps me to keep all areas of the casting back as even as possible.
Lester Breuer






------------------------------------
Posted by: Lester Breuer <frograbbit602@...>
------------------------------------


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A&Y Dave in MD
 

Price is one reason. I recently bought a replacement piece of glass and a countertop for our fire restoration. I tried to get the sink cutout from countertop, but it wasn't whole and the pieces were irregular in shape. Adding a piece of correct size to the order was pricey. Might have gone to the factory to get leftovers but glass was cheap and abundant. I got a piece of laminate safety glass, dead flat, cut exactly to my portable model bench dimensions (13"x18") with polished beveled edge for $23.

The glass shop makes custom geometry furniture tops and custom glass shower doors as well as the usual window glass.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Jul 29, 2016, at 9:03 PM, riverman_vt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

   Thank you Tom. I was just about to ask why folks had not tried a piece of polished

granite rather than glass. Unless one has a good source for really thick glass and a
way to have the edges polished to avoid any sharpness it would seem that a usable 
piece of granite should be fairly easy to find at most any reputable building supply
business these days give the demand for granite counter tops.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Charles Peck
 

I have doubts that I would ever need to sand plastic with enough pressure to flex one quarter inch plate glass.
At least not enough to make a difference on a model.
Odd size chunks can often be had at very low cost.  More cost is added when one decides the piece just has
to be some certain size.  And how much bigger does it need to be than the size of your sandpaper?
Chuck Peck

On Sat, Jul 30, 2016 at 9:15 AM, David bott dbott@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Price is one reason. I recently bought a replacement piece of glass and a countertop for our fire restoration. I tried to get the sink cutout from countertop, but it wasn't whole and the pieces were irregular in shape. Adding a piece of correct size to the order was pricey. Might have gone to the factory to get leftovers but glass was cheap and abundant. I got a piece of laminate safety glass, dead flat, cut exactly to my portable model bench dimensions (13"x18") with polished beveled edge for $23.

The glass shop makes custom geometry furniture tops and custom glass shower doors as well as the usual window glass.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Jul 29, 2016, at 9:03 PM, riverman_vt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

   Thank you Tom. I was just about to ask why folks had not tried a piece of polished

granite rather than glass. Unless one has a good source for really thick glass and a
way to have the edges polished to avoid any sharpness it would seem that a usable 
piece of granite should be fairly easy to find at most any reputable building supply
business these days give the demand for granite counter tops.

Cordially, Don Valentine



Steve SANDIFER
 

Now I am going to be a dangerous radical, but I have built 15 resin stock cars from Sunshine and Westerfield. So be prepared to laugh and swear, but it works for me.

 

I chuck my 1/4 sheet oscillating sander in my vice with 100 grit paper. I put on some of those rubber coated work gloves to give me extra grip, and I turn the sander on. I slowly put the side on the sander and keep it moving. The resin is much softer than anything else, so it is difficult to get it totally flat, but keeping it moving and changing hand pressure works. I quickly get the sides cleaned out and ready to use. Be sure to use those rubber gloves or the sander may throw the side to some far corner of the room, probably under a file cabinet or desk.

 

I don't do this method on the doors. They are very thin and require special care. 

 

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK4.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SKZ.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-NOrig.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-N1934.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-POrig.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-P1934.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-2.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-3.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-5.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/WestMP.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/WestNYC.jpg

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 2:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding

 

 

Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,

 

I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars.  I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.

 

Do you glue the grit down to the glass?  What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting?  Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)?  Grade of sandpaper?

 

Any and all help greatly appreciated.  I do not want to ruin another set of sides.

 

Thanks,

Gary Ray


Dave Nelson
 

You do not need to sand it until the boards are flash free. Getting it down to very thin is good enough because you can use an exacto blade to poke thru the ultra thin flash and cut it away.  I always use an ordinary emory board on resin kit flash and used gently it works very well to finish things up after I’ve used a knife.

 

One more tip… I found doing a mass build of stock cars at once to go a whole lot faster than going one by one. 

 

Good luck!

 

Dave Nelson


Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 


Hi Steve,
 
Some very nice looking models!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 30, 2016 7:24 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding

Now I am going to be a dangerous radical, but I have built 15 resin stock cars from Sunshine and Westerfield. So be prepared to laugh and swear, but it works for me.

 

I chuck my 1/4 sheet oscillating sander in my vice with 100 grit paper. I put on some of those rubber coated work gloves to give me extra grip, and I turn the sander on. I slowly put the side on the sander and keep it moving. The resin is much softer than anything else, so it is difficult to get it totally flat, but keeping it moving and changing hand pressure works. I quickly get the sides cleaned out and ready to use. Be sure to use those rubber gloves or the sander may throw the side to some far corner of the room, probably under a file cabinet or desk.

 

I don't do this method on the doors. They are very thin and require special care. 

 

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK4.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SKZ.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-NOrig.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-N1934.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-POrig.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-P1934.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-2.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-3.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/SK-5.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/WestMP.jpg

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/640Web/WestNYC.jpg

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, July 29, 2016 2:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Westerfield stock car sanding

 

 

Andy, Jack, Steve, and others,

 

I’d like complete details of how to sand the back of the Westerfield stock cars.  I’ve ended up damaging the bracing when sanding the back thin.

 

Do you glue the grit down to the glass?  What do you do to have equal pressure on the casting?  Do you just use your fingers (which did not seem to work for me)?  Grade of sandpaper?

 

Any and all help greatly appreciated.  I do not want to ruin another set of sides.

 

Thanks,

Gary Ray


tyesac@...
 

Don,

I got by with something even simpler.  12" square granite floor tile less than 3/8" think, but still flat enough & very stout.  A tile shop should have loose stock available on a price/piece basis.   I had some left over from tiling a fireplace hearth.

Tom Casey 

Thank you Tom. I was just about to ask why folks had not tried a piece of polished
granite rather than glass. Unless one has a good source for really thick glass and a
way to have the edges polished to avoid any sharpness it would seem that a usable 
piece of granite should be fairly easy to find at most any reputable building supply
business these days give the demand for granite counter tops.

Cordially, Don Valentine


rob.mclear3@...
 


I use a piece of glass that was actually an electric commuter train window.  Can't remember where I got it from but I know it was obtained legally before anyone thinks otherwise.  :-)   As for sanding I can't remember where I picked it up from, I think that it used to come in some resin N scale freight car kits that I used to build when i was in N before going back to HO, but I have some pieces of very hard foam rubber that I have glued to pieces of ply, enables me to put flat pressure evenly on the casts of the sides of cars.   Couldn't be without the thing now.

Rob McLear
Aussie. 

---In STMFC@..., <tyesac@...> wrote :

Don,

I got by with something even simpler.  12" square granite floor tile less than 3/8" think, but still flat enough & very stout.  A tile shop should have loose stock available on a price/piece basis.   I had some left over from tiling a fireplace hearth.

Tom Casey 



mwbpequod
 

I like to use glass work surfaces for all of my model building.


Most of mine were originally desk blotters that were tossed out along with the typewriters that used to sit on them.  I have 2 much larger glass surfaces as well in use on my work benchs


You can buy still buy glass desk top blotters - just search on Amazon and you can find 3/8" thick glass blotters for under $30.


Martin Brechbiel


Jared Harper
 


I agree that glass is a great work surface.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

---In STMFC@..., <martinwb@...> wrote :

I like to use glass work surfaces for all of my model building.


Most of mine were originally desk blotters that were tossed out along with the typewriters that used to sit on them.  I have 2 much larger glass surfaces as well in use on my work benchs


You can buy still buy glass desk top blotters - just search on Amazon and you can find 3/8" thick glass blotters for under $30.


Martin Brechbiel