Pinning Pierre Oliver's side-mount stirrups.


Robert J Miller CFA
 

I'm curious to know how others are pinning Pierre's wonderful side mount stirrups to their freight cars.

Robert J. Miller CFA
Saginaw, MI


WILLIAM PARDIE
 


Bob:

I try to make my rolling stock both as delicate and yet bulletproof as possible.   I solder either .008 or .010 wire into the pre bent step and insert them into the pre drilled holes in the car side.  I drill the holes all the way through the car side and ACC from the rear.  The outboard wire is lightly filed to produce a bolt head.

Hope this helps:


Bill Pardie


On Aug 21, 2016, at 9:10 AM, Bob Miller cajonpass02@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

I'm curious to know how others are pinning Pierre's wonderful side mount stirrups to their freight cars.

Robert J. Miller CFA
Saginaw, MI




Bill Welch
 

My routine is to use .012 brass wire pins. I begin by cutting up several short sections and put one end in flame, then pound the end to flatten it, forming a brad or rivet. There are actual small rivets available but I have not ordered any. I do want to try them. I think someone has blogged about using them.

Bill Welch



Robert J Miller CFA
 

Bill,

Do you know who makes those small rivets? That sounds like an interesting way to secure the steps.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com [STMFC]


Scott H. Haycock
 

This company makes small rivets, But their website is currently down for maintenance:


Scott Haycock


 

Bill,

Do you know who makes those small rivets? That sounds like an interesting way to secure the steps.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: fgexbill@... [STMFC]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Mark Stamm
 

www.scalehardware.com

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On Aug 21, 2016, at 5:09 PM, SFRD1947 cajonpass02@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Bill,

Do you know who makes those small rivets? That sounds like an interesting way to secure the steps.

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: fgexbill@... [STMFC]




Bud Rindfleisch
 

Bill,
  Where do you get those .012" brass pins? I have a need for some of that small of size.
     Thanks,
      Bud Rindfleisch


Bill Welch
 

Bud, as others have noted Scale Hardware: www.scalehardware.com

It is still down for maintenance. I hope that is really true.

Bill Welch


Tim O'Connor
 


The WAYBACK machine is your friend :-)

https://web.archive.org/web/20160408171835/http://www.scalehardware.com/

Tim O'Connor



 Bud, as others have noted Scale Hardware: www.scalehardware.com
 It is still down for maintenance. I hope that is really true.
 Bill Welch


Bill Welch
 


Tim O'Connor
 


The smallest rivet shown is .4 MM which works out to 1.3" in HO scale.

Is that an appropriate size for the sill step fasteners?

A .010 wire is .871" in HO scale.

Tim O'Connor




The WAYBACK machine is your friend :-)

https://web.archive.org/web/20160408171835/http://www.scalehardware.com/

Tim O'Connor



 Bud, as others have noted Scale Hardware: www.scalehardware.com
 It is still down for maintenance. I hope that is really true.
 Bill Welch


watchmeister <watchmeister@...>
 

Hi Bud

You can cut .012 pins from .012 wire. I think precision scale carries it.
I like to enlarge the holes before bending the stirrups with a #78 drill and use .015 wire from Tichy for my pins.

Ed Holler 


Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device


-------- Original message --------
From: "BlackDiamondRR@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date: 8/22/16 8:09 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Pinning Pierre Oliver's side-mount stirrups.

 

Bill,

  Where do you get those .012" brass pins? I have a need for some of that small of size.
     Thanks,
      Bud Rindfleisch


Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <timboconnor@...> wrote :


The smallest rivet shown is .4 MM which works out to 1.3" in HO scale.

Is that an appropriate size for the sill step fasteners?

A .010 wire is .871" in HO scale.

Tim O'Connor
========================

I agree ,Tim. a 1.3" diameter head equates to a 3/4" rivet, large even for underframes. This is getting into the "bridge rivet" territory.

The .871" head would be a 1/2" rivet, much more reasonable.

This is one reason I've never mentioned Scale Hardware; it isn't, at least not in HO scale. I did once found a web site in Germany that offered rivets with 0.3mm diameter heads, which would have been usable in HO... But the shanks were 0.2mm in diameter, .008", and would have required a number 90 or 91 drill. The entire rivet, head and all, would have disappeared down a No. 80 hole.

Dennis Storzek



Eric Hansmann
 

Why not use 0.012-inch brass wire? That’s what I did when building the Yarmouth NP double sheathed box car. I’ve usually got some small wire cut offs collected on the workbench. Cut one end at an angle, dip it into a CA puddle, then insert into the hole on the car side. The etched metal sill step is pre-bent and carefully slid onto the wire. A dab of CA is applied to the back of the step and the detail is pushed against the car side. After the CA is firmly set up, snip the excess wire close to the part but not flush.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, August 22, 2016 11:14 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Pinning Pierre Oliver's side-mount stirrups.

 



Thanks Tim:

 

 

Bill Welch

 



Scott H. Haycock
 

Paul Budzig's method would work for this application. You can find out about it here:


Scott Haycock


 


Why not use 0.012-inch brass wire? That’s what I did when building the Yarmouth NP double sheathed box car. I’ve usually got some small wire cut offs collected on the workbench. Cut one end at an angle, dip it into a CA puddle, then insert into the hole on the car side. The etched metal sill step is pre-bent and carefully slid onto the wire. A dab of CA is applied to the back of the step and the detail is pushed against the car side. After the CA is firmly set up, snip the excess wire close to the part but not flush.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 

 




Bill Welch
 

Ahem, check out Message #144721 posted yesterday Re: .012 wire.

Bill Welch


Bruce Smith
 

Eric,

Exactly!  By replacing the wire in the hole and then sliding the step over it, you’re not trying to place the pin through the step and I think that is an easier approach.  On the X29 steps, I placed the pins for the bottom holes and left the top one so that once the step was in place, I could drill holes for and place the drop grab iron that goes in the top hole of the right step. Note that the X29 steps there is an extra origami step because the inner leg is longer than the outer to accommodate a short vertical section and then diagonal section and finally the attachment at vertical again.

BTW, I LOVE using locking hemostats to hold the step material while I put the 90 degree twist into the ends.  

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


On Aug 22, 2016, at 12:53 PM, STMFC@... wrote:



Why not use 0.012-inch brass wire? That’s what I did when building the Yarmouth NP double sheathed box car. I’ve usually got some small wire cut offs collected on the workbench. Cut one end at an angle, dip it into a CA puddle, then insert into the hole on the car side. The etched metal sill step is pre-bent and carefully slid onto the wire. A dab of CA is applied to the back of the step and the detail is pushed against the car side. After the CA is firmly set up, snip the excess wire close to the part but not flush.
 
Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX


Tim O'Connor
 


I've seen that before - very good explanation. I wish I had one of those
"center drills" he makes for locating drill holes. I need one to locate holes
that will be .010 or less. I use the tip of a pointed dental tool now.

Tim O'Connor



Paul Budzig's method would work for this application. You can find out about it here:
http://paulbudzik.com/tools-techniques/Pin%20Rivets/pin_rivets.html
Scott Haycock


Robert J Miller CFA
 

Clever solution, Eric.

 
Robert J. Miller CFA
Saginaw, MI

Tell the truth, work hard, and come to dinner on time.
Gerald R. Ford



From: "'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, August 22, 2016 1:53 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Pinning Pierre Oliver's side-mount stirrups.

 
Why not use 0.012-inch brass wire? That’s what I did when building the Yarmouth NP double sheathed box car. I’ve usually got some small wire cut offs collected on the workbench. Cut one end at an angle, dip it into a CA puddle, then insert into the hole on the car side. The etched metal sill step is pre-bent and carefully slid onto the wire. A dab of CA is applied to the back of the step and the detail is pushed against the car side. After the CA is firmly set up, snip the excess wire close to the part but not flush.
 
Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX
 
 
 
 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, August 22, 2016 11:14 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Pinning Pierre Oliver's side-mount stirrups.
 


Thanks Tim:
 
 
Bill Welch
 




Clark Cooper
 

Tim,

He made the center drill from a worn out Dremel burr by grinding it down to a 3 or 4 sided point.

-Clark Cooper
Iowa City, IA

On Aug 22, 2016, at 4:53 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@comcast.net [STMFC] wrote:


I've seen that before - very good explanation. I wish I had one of those
"center drills" he makes for locating drill holes. I need one to locate holes
that will be .010 or less. I use the tip of a pointed dental tool now.

Tim O'Connor



Paul Budzig's method would work for this application. You can find out about it here:
http://paulbudzik.com/tools-techniques/Pin%20Rivets/pin_rivets.html
Scott Haycock