Reflecting mid-1920s freight car lettering


Eric Hansmann
 

Two HO scale freight car decal jobs wrapped up this week to move a Reading XMp box car and a PRR GS gondola further along. A summary of both projects has been posted to the DesignBuildOp blog.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/09/16/more-decal-work/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


riverman_vt@...
 

Hi Eric,

     What do you do about the fact that with one look at iyour Reading boxcar it is
easy to see that two different sets of lettering were used, that from F&C being
considerably more "white". Will careful weathering conceal such differences?
Since Athearn "Blue Box" days I have used a sharp knife blade and a fine tipped 
brush with the appropriate color of paint to change the digits in car numbers 
when more than one of the same car was desired. In this case there was so
little that was changed it was easy to conceal. I wonder about that with about
half the lettering coming from one source and the other half from another and
one appearing to be so much brighter than the other. The cars are a great
addition to any fleet if that issue can be overcome.

Cordially, Don Valentine


    


Eric Hansmann
 

Hey Don!

I think there are a couple things here that we see when a car era is positioned six from a model. 

First, the F&C decals are a bit thick, or heavy, so they do look different from the finer look of the Rail Graphics data decals. Note the thickness of the letters on the reweigh and the car class. Those stand out the most to my eye.

Second, the larger road name and car number look brighter as they are a larger size. These characters also seem a bit heavy compared to the prototype lettering. As they are larger letters, they don't seem as different as the comparison between the car class and reweigh with the rest of the data. 


Here's a close up of the model:

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/201609_xmp_2.jpg

And compare it with the prototype lettering.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/201609_xmp_proto.jpg


Normal viewing will be 20-30 inches from eye to model, plus the car will be weathered, so I'm not concerned with the different lettering standing apart from the rest on the car during normal viewing and operating. 

These are actually the first two models that I've decaled with a combination of different sets, so we will see. I've found that weathering layers are a great leveler of tone, color, and appearance.


Thanks for the question. It is something we all will deal with at some point in our model building.


Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX



On September 16, 2016 at 6:03 PM "riverman_vt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Hi Eric,

     What do you do about the fact that with one look at iyour Reading boxcar it is
easy to see that two different sets of lettering were used, that from F&C being
considerably more "white". Will careful weathering conceal such differences?
Since Athearn "Blue Box" days I have used a sharp knife blade and a fine tipped 
brush with the appropriate color of paint to change the digits in car numbers 
when more than one of the same car was desired. In this case there was so
little that was changed it was easy to conceal. I wonder about that with about
half the lettering coming from one source and the other half from another and
one appearing to be so much brighter than the other. The cars are a great
addition to any fleet if that issue can be overcome.

Cordially, Don Valentine


    


Eric Hansmann
 

Dang. I proofed everything but that first line.

It should read as this:

I think there are a couple things here that we see when a CAMERA is positioned six INCHES from a model.


Sorry 'bout that.

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


On September 17, 2016 at 9:50 AM "Eric Hansmann eric@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Hey Don!

I think there are a couple things here that we see when a car era is positioned six from a model. 

First, the F&C decals are a bit thick, or heavy, so they do look different from the finer look of the Rail Graphics data decals. Note the thickness of the letters on the reweigh and the car class. Those stand out the most to my eye.

Second, the larger road name and car number look brighter as they are a larger size. These characters also seem a bit heavy compared to the prototype lettering. As they are larger letters, they don't seem as different as the comparison between the car class and reweigh with the rest of the data. 


Here's a close up of the model:

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/201609_xmp_2.jpg

And compare it with the prototype lettering.

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/201609_xmp_proto.jpg


Normal viewing will be 20-30 inches from eye to model, plus the car will be weathered, so I'm not concerned with the different lettering standing apart from the rest on the car during normal viewing and operating. 

These are actually the first two models that I've decaled with a combination of different sets, so we will see. I've found that weathering layers are a great leveler of tone, color, and appearance.


Thanks for the question. It is something we all will deal with at some point in our model building.


Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX



On September 16, 2016 at 6:03 PM "riverman_vt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Hi Eric,

     What do you do about the fact that with one look at iyour Reading boxcar it is
easy to see that two different sets of lettering were used, that from F&C being
considerably more "white". Will careful weathering conceal such differences?
Since Athearn "Blue Box" days I have used a sharp knife blade and a fine tipped 
brush with the appropriate color of paint to change the digits in car numbers 
when more than one of the same car was desired. In this case there was so
little that was changed it was easy to conceal. I wonder about that with about
half the lettering coming from one source and the other half from another and
one appearing to be so much brighter than the other. The cars are a great
addition to any fleet if that issue can be overcome.

Cordially, Don Valentine