Color of B&M flat cars - Sunshine Kit 45.7


Marty McGuirk
 

I’m working on a Sunshine models kit for the B&M 42-foot flatcar - (their kit 45.7).
The Sunshine instructions indicate the cars were painted “Freight car red” - I’ve built enough of these kits over the years to know that’s code for “We don’t have a specific color.”

There are pictures of B&M flatcars in color in Sweetland and Horsley "Color Guide to Northern New England Freight and Passenger Equipment” - page 35 ( top of the page) shows the car in question. The car in that photo looks black to me - there’s another flatcar (different class) on the previous page where some red is visible on the side sill that could be a patch… or it could be a red car that’s gotten very, very dirty….
So, the question is for the mid-1950s era would the basic color of the car be black or red?

Appreciate any and all input.

Thanks,

Marty


Dave Parker
 

Marty:

I have the same kit, and have long wondered how Martin deduced that the 1923-built B&M flats arrived in FCR.  The builder's photos from the Cycs and a 1924 Railway Age piece are all ambiguous to my eye.  Even if they appear lighter than "straight" black, I have grown wary of BPs generally as there are hints that they were sometimes staged in a faux color to enhance details.

Rightly or wrongly, I am painting mine black, and I model 1934.  In part, I can justify this based on the lettering makeover that would have occurred in the late 1920s.  The one relevant in-service pic that I have seen doesn't contradict this (nor does it fully validate it).  As always, YMMV.

You might want to also post this query to the B&M Yahoo group.  Perhaps someone has some information that I have not seen.

Best regards,

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA



Tim O'Connor
 

Marty

there's also a very active B&M group on Facebook and they post LOTS
of excellent pictures and seem to know a great deal about the B&M.

But my guess for the color also would be black, just like B&M gondolas
and open hoppers in this era.

Tim O'

Marty:

I have the same kit, and have long wondered how Martin deduced that the 1923-built B&M flats arrived in FCR. The builder's photos from the Cycs and a 1924 Railway Age piece are all ambiguous to my eye. Even if they appear lighter than "straight" black, I have grown wary of BPs generally as there are hints that they were sometimes staged in a faux color to enhance details.

Rightly or wrongly, I am painting mine black, and I model 1934. In part, I can justify this based on the lettering makeover that would have occurred in the late 1920s. The one relevant in-service pic that I have seen doesn't contradict this (nor does it fully validate it). As always, YMMV.

You might want to also post this query to the B&M Yahoo group. Perhaps someone has some information that I have not seen.

Best regards,

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Thorsten Petschallies
 

Every other information that I have ever read indicates black for flat cars. 
The Sunshine data sheet for these flat cars being the only one indicating box car red. 

Thorsten 



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Datum: 30.09.16 14:35 (GMT+01:00)
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Betreff: [STMFC] Color of B&M flat cars - Sunshine Kit 45.7

 



I’m working on a Sunshine models kit for the B&M 42-foot flatcar - (their kit 45.7).
The Sunshine instructions indicate the cars were painted “Freight car red” - I’ve built enough of these kits over the years to know that’s code for “We don’t have a specific color.”

There are pictures of B&M flatcars in color in Sweetland and Horsley "Color Guide to Northern New England Freight and Passenger Equipment” - page 35 ( top of the page) shows the car in question. The car in that photo looks black to me - there’s another flatcar (different class) on the previous page where some red is visible on the side sill that could be a patch… or it could be a red car that’s gotten very, very dirty….
So, the question is for the mid-1950s era would the basic color of the car be black or red?

Appreciate any and all input.

Thanks,

Marty