Why model 1926?


Eric Hansmann
 

A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer as there are many different components that attract my interest. The latest DesignBuildOp blog post covers many of the elements that I've found fascinating about the 1920s. Follow th elink for more!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/08/why-model-1926/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


Tony Thompson
 

Eric Hansmann wrote:

 
A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer . . .

      Eric, your classic answer would be, "Why not model 1926?"

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Eric and List Members,
 
Thanks Eric for your fascinating write-up. I elected to model 1929, only three years ‘into the future’ from your era. This decision was mostly arrived at by my love of steam – I definitely wanted to do the pre-diesel era. To refine the decision a bit further, I realized that the late 1920’s were a boom time, with high levels of both traffic and innovation in the railroading industry. This boom came to an abrupt end on ‘Black Tuesday’ October 29, 1929. Since I like to railfan during the summer, I quickly settled on Summer 1929 as the logical choice.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 

From: 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]
Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 11:53 AM
To: 1914to1940rring@... ; stmfc@... ; proto-layouts@...
Subject: [STMFC] Why model 1926?
 


A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer as there are many different components that attract my interest. The latest DesignBuildOp blog post covers many of the elements that I've found fascinating about the 1920s. Follow th elink for more!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/08/why-model-1926/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


Paul Doggett <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

Eric 

At least you only have explain they year. I have to explain why American!!!. 😆😆😆

On Sat, 8 Oct, 2016 at 20:16, 'Claus Schlund' claus@... [STMFC]
wrote:
 

Hi Eric and List Members,
 
Thanks Eric for your fascinating write-up. I elected to model 1929, only three years ‘into the future’ from your era. This decision was mostly arrived at by my love of steam – I definitely wanted to do the pre-diesel era. To refine the decision a bit further, I realized that the late 1920’s were a boom time, with high levels of both traffic and innovation in the railroading industry. This boom came to an abrupt end on ‘Black Tuesday’ October 29, 1929. Since I like to railfan during the summer, I quickly settled on Summer 1929 as the logical choice.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 
Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 11:53 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Why model 1926?
 


A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer as there are many different components that attract my interest. The latest DesignBuildOp blog post covers many of the elements that I've found fascinating about the 1920s. Follow th elink for more!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/08/why-model-1926/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


Eric Hansmann
 

Tony Thompson wrote:

 

      Eric, your classic answer would be, "Why not model 1926?"

 

 

Yes indeed, that would be a classic. But after the chuckling dies down, the questioner would still want some answers. It’s good to have something up your sleeve to keep the conversation rolling along.

 

Eric

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 


Eric Hansmann
 

Claus,

 

Long ago I had considered 1929, too. But many timber operations closer to Elkins, WV, were done by then, as were a couple of large coke operations. Coal was strong but I was looking for more diversity in the traffic mix and 1926 seemed to fit that demand a little better for the locale. Plus, the WM had moved all of the Russian Decapods out of Elkins by 1929. Having them all stationed in Elkins in 1926 enabled easier modeling of the WM loco fleet as Spectrum had released their model about the same time I was plotting my time period.

 

It’s always interesting sifting through the historical record for industrial trends that affect rail traffic movements.

 

Eric

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 1:17 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Why model 1926?

 




Hi Eric and List Members,

 

Thanks Eric for your fascinating write-up. I elected to model 1929, only three years ‘into the future’ from your era. This decision was mostly arrived at by my love of steam – I definitely wanted to do the pre-diesel era. To refine the decision a bit further, I realized that the late 1920’s were a boom time, with high levels of both traffic and innovation in the railroading industry. This boom came to an abrupt end on ‘Black Tuesday’ October 29, 1929. Since I like to railfan during the summer, I quickly settled on Summer 1929 as the logical choice.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 

From: 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]

Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 11:53 AM

To: 1914to1940rring@... ; stmfc@... ; proto-layouts@...

Subject: [STMFC] Why model 1926?

 




A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer as there are many different components that attract my interest. The latest DesignBuildOp blog post covers many of the elements that I've found fascinating about the 1920s. Follow th elink for more!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/08/why-model-1926/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX



Eric Hansmann
 

Somehow Paul, I suspect you answer that question many, many more times than I answer why I model 1926.

 

Eric

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 1:29 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Why model 1926?

 



Eric 

 

At least you only have explain they year. I have to explain why American!!!. 😆😆😆

 

Paul Doggett UK 

 

On Sat, 8 Oct, 2016 at 20:16, 'Claus Schlund' claus@... [STMFC]

<STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Hi Eric and List Members,

 

Thanks Eric for your fascinating write-up. I elected to model 1929, only three years ‘into the future’ from your era. This decision was mostly arrived at by my love of steam – I definitely wanted to do the pre-diesel era. To refine the decision a bit further, I realized that the late 1920’s were a boom time, with high levels of both traffic and innovation in the railroading industry. This boom came to an abrupt end on ‘Black Tuesday’ October 29, 1929. Since I like to railfan during the summer, I quickly settled on Summer 1929 as the logical choice.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 

From: 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]

Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 11:53 AM

To: 1914to1940rring@... ; stmfc@... ; proto-layouts@...

Subject: [STMFC] Why model 1926?

 

 

A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer as there are many different components that attract my interest. The latest DesignBuildOp blog post covers many of the elements that I've found fascinating about the 1920s. Follow th elink for more!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/08/why-model-1926/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX



 

Claus – Years ago when so few period cars were available I chose 1924 to allow me to use X-29 box cars from Train Miniature.  More than half my fleet were TM, all the same length and height, mixed with MDC Old Timers, Red Ball and scratch built.  Now, of course, that’s not a problem. – Al Westerfield
 

From: 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]
Sent: Saturday, October 8, 2016 6:44 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Why model 1926?
 
 

Claus,

Long ago I had considered 1929, too. But many timber operations closer to Elkins, WV, were done by then, as were a couple of large coke operations. Coal was strong but I was looking for more diversity in the traffic mix and 1926 seemed to fit that demand a little better for the locale. Plus, the WM had moved all of the Russian Decapods out of Elkins by 1929. Having them all stationed in Elkins in 1926 enabled easier modeling of the WM loco fleet as Spectrum had released their model about the same time I was plotting my time period.

It’s always interesting sifting through the historical record for industrial trends that affect rail traffic movements.

Eric

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 1:17 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Why model 1926?




Hi Eric and List Members,

Thanks Eric for your fascinating write-up. I elected to model 1929, only three years ‘into the future’ from your era. This decision was mostly arrived at by my love of steam – I definitely wanted to do the pre-diesel era. To refine the decision a bit further, I realized that the late 1920’s were a boom time, with high levels of both traffic and innovation in the railroading industry. This boom came to an abrupt end on ‘Black Tuesday’ October 29, 1929. Since I like to railfan during the summer, I quickly settled on Summer 1929 as the logical choice.

Claus Schlund

From: 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]

Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 11:53 AM

To: 1914to1940rring@... ; stmfc@... ; proto-layouts@...

Subject: [STMFC] Why model 1926?




A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer as there are many different components that attract my interest. The latest DesignBuildOp blog post covers many of the elements that I've found fascinating about the 1920s. Follow th elink for more!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/08/why-model-1926/

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX



Gary Ray
 

1926 was the year of completion of the Natron Cutoff on the Shasta Division of Southern Pacific.  Originally I was modeling Dunsmuir to Weed and wanted to model just before the line was completed.  Now switched to the valley, modeling Gerber to La Moine, CA.  Still in 1926.  Lots of local industry and everything was traveling by rail – sometimes just a few miles.

Great to have other people modeling the 20’s.

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 4:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Why model 1926?

 




Somehow Paul, I suspect you answer that question many, many more times than I answer why I model 1926.

 

Eric

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 1:29 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Why model 1926?

 



Eric 

 

At least you only have explain they year. I have to explain why American!!!. 😆😆😆

 

Paul Doggett UK 

 

On Sat, 8 Oct, 2016 at 20:16, 'Claus Schlund' claus@... [STMFC]

<STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Hi Eric and List Members,

 

Thanks Eric for your fascinating write-up. I elected to model 1929, only three years ‘into the future’ from your era. This decision was mostly arrived at by my love of steam – I definitely wanted to do the pre-diesel era. To refine the decision a bit further, I realized that the late 1920’s were a boom time, with high levels of both traffic and innovation in the railroading industry. This boom came to an abrupt end on ‘Black Tuesday’ October 29, 1929. Since I like to railfan during the summer, I quickly settled on Summer 1929 as the logical choice.

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 

From: 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]

Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 11:53 AM

Subject: [STMFC] Why model 1926?

 

 

A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer as there are many different components that attract my interest. The latest DesignBuildOp blog post covers many of the elements that I've found fascinating about the 1920s. Follow th elink for more!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/08/why-model-1926/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 





Gary Ray
 

 

I did a slide show today for the Sierra Division/NMRA to show the progress being made on my 1926 layout.  This was an easier way to share without having everyone do a two hour round trip from today’s meeting place. 

 

The slide show can be seen in a DropBox file at:

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/fskwy5rc1wzasb6/Gerber%20Sub%20~%201926.ppsx?dl=0

 

Gary Ray

Modeling Shasta Division SP in 1926 


Mansell Peter Hambly
 

The Golden Years of steam and the freight cars we seek.

Mansell Peter Hambly
COQUITLAM, B.C/



From: "'Claus Schlund' claus@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, October 8, 2016 12:16:41 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Why model 1926?

 

Hi Eric and List Members,
 
Thanks Eric for your fascinating write-up. I elected to model 1929, only three years ‘into the future’ from your era. This decision was mostly arrived at by my love of steam – I definitely wanted to do the pre-diesel era. To refine the decision a bit further, I realized that the late 1920’s were a boom time, with high levels of both traffic and innovation in the railroading industry. This boom came to an abrupt end on ‘Black Tuesday’ October 29, 1929. Since I like to railfan during the summer, I quickly settled on Summer 1929 as the logical choice.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 
From: 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC]
Sent: Saturday, October 08, 2016 11:53 AM
To: 1914to1940rring@... ; stmfc@... ; proto-layouts@...
Subject: [STMFC] Why model 1926?
 


A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer as there are many different components that attract my interest. The latest DesignBuildOp blog post covers many of the elements that I've found fascinating about the 1920s. Follow th elink for more!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/08/why-model-1926/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX



Jared Harper
 


I

I get asked why I model the Alma branch?  Are you from Kansas? Do you have family there?  Did you have family who worked for the railroad?  I have to say, no, no, no and then I have to go through a long story about the serendipity that brought me to where I am.

Jared  Harper
Modeling Santa Fe's Alma branch in May 1943

---In STMFC@..., <eric@...> wrote :

A frequent question in emails and person conversations asks why I model 1926. It's not easy to answer as there are many different components that attract my interest. The latest DesignBuildOp blog post covers many of the elements that I've found fascinating about the 1920s. Follow th elink for more!

http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/2016/10/08/why-model-1926/

 

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


Clark Propst
 

That’s a lot of layout in a short time Gary. Really something!
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa