Flat car stake pockets...


Jack Burgess
 

I have a photo that shows a little more than half of one side of a wood YV flat car. It is most likely a 36-foot car. The two needle beams are visible and there is a stake pocket on what seems to be the centerline of the car. That results in 9 stake pockets on each side of the car. Most of the other flat cars owned by the YV had 8 stake pockets per side while a couple only had 6.

 

I’m just wondering if an odd number of stake pockets could be just as common as an even number or am I misinterpreting what I’m seeing.

 

Jack Burgess


al_brown03
 

The RPI site describes flat cars of various lengths with 11, 13, 15, 17, and 19 stake pockets. So I don't know if an odd number is "just as common as an even number", but I think it's safe to call odd numbers
"common".

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


mopacfirst
 

The (steel) nominal 40' flatcar modeled by Red Caboose has 12 stake pockets, while the MoPac version that was nominally just a foot longer had 13.  The 45' cars also had 13.

There are (well-documented) lots of gons that had either even or odd numbers of stakes, also, so I think it's reasonable that either is possible.

Ron Merrick


mark_landgraf
 

Jack

The quantity of stake pockets is function on the quantity of crossbearers that support the floor. These are the ribs that come off the center sill of the car. Stake pockets are typically located at the end of each crossbearer. The same can be said for the stakes on a gondola. You need to flip the car over an see what's going on underneath. 

A word of caution, in the past, not all model makers provided the proper underframe  details. Obviously the underframe of a 40ft 40 ton boxcar will have less crossbearers than a 40ft 70ton flat or gon.   ‎But to some of those manufacturers, it's a 40ft underframe that can be used under any 40ft car. In reality, this is far from the truth.  Fortunetly, with the quality demanded but current day modelers, it has forced the mfrs to to do their homework or risk condemnation on the Web. 

Mark Landgraf

From: 'Jack Burgess' jack@... [STMFC]
Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 5:41 PM
To: Steam Era Freight Cars
Reply To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Flat car stake pockets...

 

I have a photo that shows a little more than half of one side of a wood YV flat car. It is most likely a 36-foot car. The two needle beams are visible and there is a stake pocket on what seems to be the centerline of the car. That results in 9 stake pockets on each side of the car. Most of the other flat cars owned by the YV had 8 stake pockets per side while a couple only had 6.

 

I’m just wondering if an odd number of stake pockets could be just as common as an even number or am I misinterpreting what I’m seeing.

 

Jack Burgess



Jack Burgess
 

Thanks.I think that my assumptions are correct.



Jack



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 2:42 PM
To: Steam Era Freight Cars
Subject: [STMFC] Flat car stake pockets...








I have a photo that shows a little more than half of one side of a wood YV
flat car. It is most likely a 36-foot car. The two needle beams are visible
and there is a stake pocket on what seems to be the centerline of the car.
That results in 9 stake pockets on each side of the car. Most of the other
flat cars owned by the YV had 8 stake pockets per side while a couple only
had 6.



I'm just wondering if an odd number of stake pockets could be just as common
as an even number or am I misinterpreting what I'm seeing.



Jack Burgess


Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <mark_landgraf@...> wrote :

Jack

The quantity of stake pockets is function on the quantity of crossbearers that support the floor.
======================

It's a wood frame flatcar... therefore the number of crossbearers is two, the needle beams.

Stake pockets have two functions, or did back in the era this car was built: keep freight from falling off the deck, or provide support for planks to make a temporary gondola. It's this later function that seems to dictate spacing, more than 3-1/2 or 4 feet and the span becomes too long for the common 2" planking. Likewise,  3-1/2 foot spacing ensures three stakes against the side of a pile of ties. much longer spacing risks having loads like ties shake around and protrude outside the clearance limit.

Dennis Storzek