automobile cars


Tim O'Connor
 


SOME railroads considered double door cars to be automobile cars.

But not all. The Santa Fe called them Furniture or Fe class cars.

That classification continued all the way to the Fe-42's built in 1969.

Tim O'Connor


Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

 

SOME railroads considered double door cars to be automobile cars.


       The definition I gave was the ARA and AAR definition. The naming choices of individual railroads are a separate subject, and as Tim suggests, there were certainly cases where railroad preferences were very much at odds with the "official" recommendation or classification.
Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Armand Premo
 

Didn't they have the "XA" designation? Armand Premo

On Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 5:32 PM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

 

SOME railroads considered double door cars to be automobile cars.


       The definition I gave was the ARA and AAR definition. The naming choices of individual railroads are a separate subject, and as Tim suggests, there were certainly cases where railroad preferences were very much at odds with the "official" recommendation or classification.
Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history







Tony Thompson
 

Armand Premo wrote:

 
Didn't they have the "XA" designation? Armand Premo

      Yes, that was the original designation. In 1929, for example, XA was the only auto car type, and there was also an XF designation for furniture cars, which disappeared soon after.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






thecitrusbelt@...
 

One document I saw (http://www.nakina.net/other/aartype.html) derives its list of AAR Mechanical Designations from Official Railway Equipment Registers starting in 1917. The range of years to which the designations apply also are listed. 


Unfortunately, the list does not go back before 1917 so the word "carriage" does not appear in the descriptions. Note that "XA" evolved and overlapped ""XAR" and "XF" appears to have lasted into the mid-1960s.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


 

"XA" -- Automobile. Similar in design to general service box car, but with exceptionally large side or side and end doors (1/17-7/32).

"XA" -- Automobile. Similar in design to general service box car, having 10 ft. or greater clear height inside but with side doors at least 10 ft. wide, with or without end doors (4/38-7/43).

"XAF" -- Automobile-Furniture. Similar in design to automobile car, but usually of larger cubic capacity and greater inside clear height (7/32-10/66).

"XAR" -- Automobile. Similar in design to general service box car, but with side doors at least 10 ft. wide, with or without end doors, and equipped with permanent automobile stowing equipment (4/38-1/49).

"XAR" -- Automobile device. A house car similar in design to "XM" box except unlined with side or side and end doors and equipped with loading racks and/or floor tubes with tie-down chains for loading setup automobiles and trucks, not suitable for general service loading of all miscellaneous commodities (1/53-10/66).
It is recommended that in each case where loading racks in "XAR" and "XMR" cars have been made inoperative by securing in roof of cars for the purpose of transferring cars to general service loading, a note to be included in the Official Railway Equipment Register showing series or individual numbers of cars affected.

"XF" -- Furniture. Similar in design to general service box car, but usually with greater cubic capacity (1/17-10/66).

"XMR" -- Automobile Device. A house car similar in design to "XM", fully lined with side or side and end doors, equipped with loading racks and/or floor tubes with tie-down chains for loading setup automobiles and trucks and suitable for general service loading of other miscellaneous commodities (1/49-10/66).
It is recommended that in each case where loading racks in "XAR" and "XMR" cars have been made inoperative by securing in roof of cars for the purpose of transferring cars to general service loading, a note be included in the Official Railway Equipment Register showing series or individual numbers of cars affected.

"XR" -- Auto Device Car. A house car similar in design to "XM" box either lined or unlined, with side or side and end doors and equipped with loading racks and/or floor tubes with tie-down chains for loading setup automobiles and trucks (1/68).
It is recommended that when loading racks in "XR" cars have been secured in roof of cars for purpose of transferring cars to general service loading, a note be included in the Official Railway Equipment Register showing series or individual numbers of cars affected and whether such cars are lined or unlined (1/68).

 


 


Tim O'Connor
 


That was really my point Armand - the notion that the term "automobile car"
is anything more than a "nickname" for certain types of cars.

In the 1950 ORER for example, you will see double door ATSF box cars with
AAR classifications XM, XME, XMR, XAP, and XAR.

Tim O'Connor



 > Didn't they have the "XA" designation? Armand Premo


The definition I gave was the ARA and AAR definition. The naming choices of individual railroads are a separate subject, and as Tim suggests, there were certainly cases where railroad preferences were very much at odds with the "official" recommendation or classification.
Tony Thompson


Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

In June 1910, the ARA accepted the proposed classification of cars that had been drawn up at its request by the Master Car Builders Association. The complete list was published at the time in various trade journals including Railway Age Gazette 1910 vol. 48, beginning on page 1620. This can be viewed or downloaded at https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=njp.32101049000712;view=1up;seq=1662

 

There were four classes for “General Service Freight Equipment Cars” –

XM Box Car
XA Automobile Car
XF Furniture Car

XV Box Car Ventilated

It defines XA as “Box car of similar design to general service car, having exceptionally large side doors or end doors”, while XF was as per XA “except unusually greater capacity in cubic feet”.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, 7 March 2017 1:37 p.m.
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] automobile cars

 




One document I saw (http://www.nakina.net/other/aartype.html) derives its list of AAR Mechanical Designations from Official Railway Equipment Registers starting in 1917. The range of years to which the designations apply also are listed. 

 

Unfortunately, the list does not go back before 1917 so the word "carriage" does not appear in the descriptions. Note that "XA" evolved and overlapped ""XAR" and "XF" appears to have lasted into the mid-1960s.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

 

 


charles slater
 

Many of the earlier Santa Fe Fe-class cars were lettered Furniture and Automobile on the car side.

Charlie Slater 


Sent from Outlook




From: STMFC@... on behalf of Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]
Sent: Monday, March 6, 2017 1:09 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] re: automobile cars
 
 


SOME railroads considered double door cars to be automobile cars.

But not all. The Santa Fe called them Furniture or Fe class cars.

That classification continued all the way to the Fe-42's built in 1969.

Tim O'Connor


Tim O'Connor
 


Atlantic Coast Line also had this practice.

Tim O'


Many of the earlier Santa Fe Fe-class cars were lettered Furniture and Automobile on the car side.
Charlie Slater