Topics

Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Bob Chaparro
 

Here is another photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives. 

 

Caption: Two workers at the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. are photographed loading a freight railroad car with barrels of chemicals for shipment. During World War II, the company manufactured chemicals vital to the war industry.

 

http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505

 

A couple of things about this photo caught my eye. It appears that the barrels are being loaded in layers with a wood deck constructed for the second layer. Was this a typical loading arrangement for barrels in this time period or would it depend on the contents of the barrels?

 

Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote :

Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?

=========================


Specifically known as grain lines.


Dennis Storzek

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.



Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?



And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Loading Barrels In A Boxcar





Here is another photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives.



Caption: Two workers at the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. are photographed loading a freight railroad car with barrels of chemicals for shipment. During World War II, the company manufactured chemicals vital to the war industry.



<http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505



A couple of things about this photo caught my eye. It appears that the barrels are being loaded in layers with a wood deck constructed for the second layer. Was this a typical loading arrangement for barrels in this time period or would it depend on the contents of the barrels?



Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?



Thanks.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Mark Stamm
 

My guess would be that it secured the barrels in transit. The SLSF boxcar is from series 126000-126999 it has an IH of 8'4". Assuming 55 gallon drums have not changed significantly in height since the 1940's, two drums of approximately 33" in height plus a 2' riser and a layer in between would fill the car to the roofline. 

Mark

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

On Mar 12, 2017, at 2:04 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.

Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?

And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Here is another photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives.

Caption: Two workers at the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. are photographed loading a freight railroad car with barrels of chemicals for shipment. During World War II, the company manufactured chemicals vital to the war industry.

<http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505

A couple of things about this photo caught my eye. It appears that the barrels are being loaded in layers with a wood deck constructed for the second layer. Was this a typical loading arrangement for barrels in this time period or would it depend on the contents of the barrels?

Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Greg Martin
 

Schuyler and all,
 
This is a typical AAR barrel loading diagram with a second layer. It would be nice to have a shot of the bracing and blocking to show the way it was done in the AAR diagrams. We can't forget that the cars were loaded for weight first and then cubic capacity.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 3/12/2017 12:04:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.

Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?

And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?

Schuyler

Bruce Smith
 

Schuyler,

I would disagree with your assessment of the floor. Magnify the image and you can see barrels under the floorwork. At first I thought that the second layer was not high enough, but again, careful perusal of the image shows that the barrels under the floor are upright. It would appear that at least one more layer could be added over the layer currently being loaded.

As for the weight... it's stenciled on the top :)
G (gross) - 360
T (tare) - 10
X (net) - 350

I'll assume that is in pounds, as the Chemical Engineering Catalog of 1922 indicated that a barrel of alkali was between 300 and 400 lbs depending on the formulation.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@... <STMFC@...> on behalf of 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:04 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Loading Barrels In A Boxcar

Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.



Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?



And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Loading Barrels In A Boxcar





Here is another photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives.



Caption: Two workers at the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. are photographed loading a freight railroad car with barrels of chemicals for shipment. During World War II, the company manufactured chemicals vital to the war industry.



<http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505



A couple of things about this photo caught my eye. It appears that the barrels are being loaded in layers with a wood deck constructed for the second layer. Was this a typical loading arrangement for barrels in this time period or would it depend on the contents of the barrels?



Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?



Thanks.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

Germain Golembowski <golembo@...>
 

Reply to all:
 
Something caught my eye in the photos of those gentlemen loading those barrels.  I rolled a few of the 55 gallon petroleum barrels back in my day during a stint in the Air Force  in the 60s and the barrels in the photo seam to be shorter then the 55 gal type. Perhaps about 3/4 the size of a standard 55 gallon size.. Just saying...
 
G A Jerry Golembowski
Grandy NC 

Donald B. Valentine
 




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

Those are NOT lightweight barrels! Is that a deck over a layer of barrels, or, to my eyes (the photo’s pretty dark) it looks like a false floor to put these on about 2’ or so above the car floor. The content of the barrel is ALKALI NO. 1 FLAKE.

Does anybody know what weight would be in a 55 gallon drum of that material?

And why would anyone build a false floor, if that IS what I am seeing there?

Schuyler



   Take another look at the photo, Schuyler. What you have identified as a  false floor is on top of the first layer of barrels which makes it closer to what 40 inches or so about the real floor, or the height of a 55 gal. drum. Note that there is a board placed vertically along the outside of the car on the floor which was probably to keep the rings and ends of the barrels from damaging the interior lining if any rough car handling occured. Another vertical board has been nailed to the interior sheathing, again in a vertical position, at the top of the first layer of drums as well, the distance between them being what made you think the "false floor" was only 2 ft. above the real floor. I really don't think there is any false floor involved here, only two boards installed vertically to protect the interior sheathing as these cars were used to transport grain, with some additional boards laid on top of the first layer of drums to provide and even flat surface to keep the second layer of drums from tipping. I'll wager 
that two more vertical boards to protect the interior sheathing for the second layer were added before things
became too tight to do so as well. That at least is the way I would have loaded the car were I in charge of doing so.

Kind of a neat lifting mechanism to lift the drums and note how the workmen in the car is bent over so he does
not hit his head on the underside of the roof supports. That alone indicates the height of the drums in the lower layer of them. The interior height of these cars was only 8 ft. 4 in. and out of the original 1,000 cars in the series (126000 - 125999) there were still 109 of them listed as still in service in my April 1949 ORER. Has
anyone ever offered a model of these fairly common cars? They were seen fairly often in New England.

Cordially, Don Valentine

Tim O'Connor
 


A "barrel of oil" (unit of measurement) is 42 gallons. So perhaps that is
the size of the barrels.

Tim O'Connor



Something caught my eye in the photos of those gentlemen loading those barrels.  I rolled a few of the 55 gallon petroleum barrels back in my day during a stint in the Air Force  in the 60s and the barrels in the photo seam to be shorter then the 55 gal type. Perhaps about 3/4 the size of a standard 55 gallon size.. Just saying...
 
G A Jerry Golembowski
Grandy NC

Douglas Harding
 

Steel drums are available in several sizes. http://www.lexingtoncontainercompany.com/publishImages/Steel-Drums~~element49.jpg

55 gallon is 23”x35”

30 gallon is 18”x29”

The steel drums in the photo look to be 55 gallon, ie 35” high.

 

AAR Pamphlet No.4 (my copy is dated 1941/1948) contains the rules and regulations for safe loading of drums and barrel. The diagrams for a doubled layer, show 1” boards to be laid on top of the first layer, so the second layer can be set in place. 2x4s are used for horizontal “bilge” protection, though not required for steel drums. 1x6” material to be used as vertical buffer strips between steel drums and crossing bracing.

 

AAR Pamphlet No. 24 (for mixed loads of paint in drums, barrels or pails 1936/1945) specifies for doorway protection the boards must not be less than 1x4” one placed close to the floor and to each other to prevent the lading from falling or rolling out of the car or coming in contact with the doors.

 

The 1930 ARA Loading rules calls for board of 1x6” to be nailed across the door openings when loading empty barrels.

 

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Ah, now that I am looking at the picture without the sun backlighting my monitor (I SAID it was a dark image . . .) I see that this is the second deck of barrels. Sorry I misread the image the first time earlier today.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 1:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Loading Barrels In A Boxcar





Here is another photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Archives.



Caption: Two workers at the Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co. are photographed loading a freight railroad car with barrels of chemicals for shipment. During World War II, the company manufactured chemicals vital to the war industry.



<http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505> http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/15944/rec/1505



A couple of things about this photo caught my eye. It appears that the barrels are being loaded in layers with a wood deck constructed for the second layer. Was this a typical loading arrangement for barrels in this time period or would it depend on the contents of the barrels?



Also notice the line markings on the car interior indicating the limits for various grain loads. Was there a term for these lines?



Thanks.



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Greg Martin
 

Schuyler,
 
What you are seeing is a 2x? standing on edge to protect the door and doorway from the barrels shifting in transit. This occurs at the top and bottom of the barrels and makes for a good ledger for the false floor above the barrels, this will occur on the second layer as well. It gives you the impression that there is a false floor but there is no need for one. The rule specify in nearly every loading of a closed top load that the door and doorway must be protect from a load shift, the piece of bracing (sticker) that intersects the 2x8 is cut the dimension of the void to also protect the door. Remember that "hunting" is not just the end to end motion but is also the side to side motion of the car caused by the trucks and not the slack action.  Just remember that everything loaded seeks the void, it is the first rule of thumb.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 
Bruce writes:

Schuyler,

I would disagree with your assessment of the floor.  Magnify the image and you can see barrels under the floorwork....  

jeralbin@...
 

The barrels contain flake/crystal caustic soda/sodium hydroxide/NaOH.  Regards Jerry Albin

Tim O'Connor
 


 > The barrels contain flake/crystal caustic soda/sodium hydroxide/NaOH.
 > Regards Jerry Albin


A friend of mine worked a summer at Cumberland Farms dairy in New Jersey
in the 1960's. One of his jobs was to test the Ph of incoming tanker trucks
of bulk milk. He told me that if the milk was too acidic, he would dump
large bags of caustic soda - LYE - into the tank in order to "sweeten" the
load. So anyway, that's something you can deliver to the creamery on your
layout! :-)

Tim O'Connor

Donald B. Valentine
 




---In STMFC@..., <timboconnor@...> wrote :


 > The barrels contain flake/crystal caustic soda/sodium hydroxide/NaOH.
 > Regards Jerry Albin


A friend of mine worked a summer at Cumberland Farms dairy in New Jersey
in the 1960's. One of his jobs was to test the Ph of incoming tanker trucks
of bulk milk. He told me that if the milk was too acidic, he would dump
large bags of caustic soda - LYE - into the tank in order to "sweeten" the
load. So anyway, that's something you can deliver to the creamery on your
layout! :-)

Tim O'Connor


  If you remember back into the late 1950's and early 1960's, Tim, you may recall 
that Crummy Farms and Garelick Bros. were often fined in Mass. for selling milk
that had less than 3.7% butterfat content. Can't help but wonder what would have
happened to them had they been caught in Mass. or northern New England adding 
caustic soda to it. Now both Garelick and Crummy Farms are owned by Suiza
Foods Corp., as is West Lynn Creamery, and anyone who knows anything about
milk won't touch their products. I don't know a single farmer in this region who
ships to either of them and expect their milk, if one can call it that, may be coming 
from outside of the New England Region. Most everyone around here ships to the
Cabot Co-op, which is Agrimark, or the St. Albans Co-op with a few still shipping
to H.P.Hood or Hood owned Booth Bros. Unfortunately it has now been 45 years
since any of it has moved by rail in either freight or passenger service.

Cordially, Don Valentine