GATX 7167 - The Pierce Company


thecitrusbelt@...
 

A nice, large tank car photo submitted to the Fairport-E.Rochester Post - Fairport of New York:

 

http://www.fairport-erpost.com/storyimage/NU/20100706/NEWS/307069943/AR/0/AR-307069943.jpg

 

The story of the Pierce Oil Company, from the newspaper, is below.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

Pierce Oil Co.

 

In 1902 the Signal Oil Company of Cleveland, Ohio erected two buildings just beyond the Ontario Drill Works on Ontario Street. Five years later the company was incorporated as the Pierce Oil Company, with the workers arriving each day by train. They made mustard seed oil, then a rubber extender made from vegetable oil. Mr. Pierce and his four sons ran the company.

 

Branching out, the company began to manufacture blown oils, which were developed from corn, rapeseed and castor beans. Refined rapeseed oil was imported from Japan. These oils were used in finishing artificial leather, real leather and patent leather, used extensively at that time for shoes, bags and belts.

 

These products made up the principal part of the business until 1918 when a refinery was installed for refining vegetable oils such as corn and peanut oils, which are used in making salad and cooking oils. Due to the growth of the business, the plant was enlarged, the oil products continued to be refined and a new brick office building was erected. It remains standing today.

 

During World War I, a large quantity of medicinal castor oil was sold to the United States government. The heavy blown oils were used in marine engines. A million and a half barrels of oil were shipped each year. The company continued until the early 1970s. Today the buildings are home to many small businesses.

 


riverman_vt@...
 

   Nice photo of The Pierce Company tank car, Bob, the identity issue not withstanding. 
I wonder if I have missed something when looking at such photos in the past, however.
What are the two round pieces protruding from the frame and showing just above the outer
wheelset in each truck. I've never noticed these before and wonder if they are related to the
draft gear or what purpose they served.

Cordially, Don Valentine
 


destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <riverman_vt@...> wrote :

   Nice photo of The Pierce Company tank car, Bob, the identity issue not withstanding. 
I wonder if I have missed something when looking at such photos in the past, however.
What are the two round pieces protruding from the frame and showing just above the outer
wheelset in each truck. I've never noticed these before and wonder if they are related to the
draft gear or what purpose they served.

Cordially, Don Valentine
 =================

Don, the car has Cardwell draft gear, and you are looking at the nut and washer that retain the Cardwell system crosswise compression springs.

Dennis Storzek


Tangent Scale Models
 

<<Don valentine wrote:  "I wonder if I have missed something when looking at such photos in the past, however. What are the two round pieces protruding from the frame and showing just above the outer
wheelset in each truck. I've never noticed these before and wonder if they are related to the
draft gear or what purpose they served.">>
<Dennis Storzek replied: "Don, the car has Cardwell draft gear, and you are looking at the nut and washer that retain the Cardwell system crosswise compression springs.>

I would like to add a few points to this thread:

These Cardwell draft gear spring parts are part of the HO Scale Tangent Scale Models GATC 1917-design tank car models that we offer factory-painted, where applicable.  We will offer these, and other parts from our newest steam-era model, as separate parts down the road for kitbashers, detailers, etc.  Watch our "Parts" page for more information.

Also, the gorgeous photo of GATX 7167, the car that spawned this thread, is indeed a GATC 1917-design 8000 gallon radial course tank car (i.e. the Tangent model).

Finally, on Wednesday of this week we will release the last very small batch of our original production 8,000 gallon GATC 1917-design tank cars, so if anyone missed out on getting those, please see our website this Wednesday.  These are cars from the original production that were late in getting to our warehouse (this batch will only include the 5 gorgeous RTR fully-painted and lettered paint schemes from our production announced at Trainfest in Milwaukee last November).

Best wishes,

David Lehlbach
Tangent Scale Models


riverman_vt@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <tangentscalemodels@...> wrote :

<<Don valentine wrote:  "I wonder if I have missed something when looking at such photos in the past, however. What are the two round pieces protruding from the frame and showing just above the outer
wheelset in each truck. I've never noticed these before and wonder if they are related to the
draft gear or what purpose they served.">>
<Dennis Storzek replied: "Don, the car has Cardwell draft gear, and you are looking at the nut and washer that retain the Cardwell system crosswise compression springs.>

I would like to add a few points to this thread:

These Cardwell draft gear spring parts are part of the HO Scale Tangent Scale Models GATC 1917-design tank car models that we offer factory-painted, where applicable.  We will offer these, and other parts from our newest steam-era model, as separate parts down the road for kitbashers, detailers, etc.  Watch our "Parts" page for more information.

Also, the gorgeous photo of GATX 7167, the car that spawned this thread, is indeed a GATC 1917-design 8000 gallon radial course tank car (i.e. the Tangent model).

Finally, on Wednesday of this week we will release the last very small batch of our original production 8,000 gallon GATC 1917-design tank cars, so if anyone missed out on getting those, please see our website this Wednesday.  These are cars from the original production that were late in getting to our warehouse (this batch will only include the 5 gorgeous RTR fully-painted and lettered paint schemes from our production announced at Trainfest in Milwaukee last November).

Best wishes,

David Lehlbach
Tangent Scale Models


   Thank you Dennis and David. This is good info to have. I'm embarrassed to note, David, that I
hadn't even noticed it on the two of your tank cars I have.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Schleigh Mike
 

Hi Freight Car Fans!

I am a bit surprised that the Cardwell draft gear was not immediately recognized in the referenced photo.  It is not new to our modeling or documentation efforts.  It is a feature of the Sunshine #99 kit series  although in comments therein Martin did not recognize what those horizontal coil springs were all about.  Further, in the prolifically produced AC&F Type 21car from LifeLike/Walthers these features are right in there.  It is not a feature of the F&C Type 11 only because the modeler adds their own coupler housing but it would have been the likely draft gear applied by AC&F.  This is made clear in Ted Culotta's Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Vol Two, as many photos and end-of-tank stenciling images show.  This draft gear type was commonly applied to tank cars from the teens, twenties, into the thirties, and perhaps beyond.  It is the primary illustration of the 1926 Railway Training Institute illustration.

What is it about this particular gear made it so applicable to tank cars?  Was it also applied to other cars?  I have not looked yet but I do not recall it turning up in other illustrations, drawings, or models of other cars.  Why was it a tank car favorite?

Regards from now snow covered western Penna.  Mike Schleigh in Grove City.



From: "riverman_vt@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 5:08 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: GATX 7167 - The Pierce Company

 



---In STMFC@..., wrote :

<just above the outer
wheelset in each truck. I've never noticed these before and wonder if they are related to the
draft gear or what purpose they served.">>


I would like to add a few points to this thread:

These Cardwell draft gear spring parts are part of the HO Scale Tangent Scale Models GATC 1917-design tank car models that we offer factory-painted, where applicable.  We will offer these, and other parts from our newest steam-era model, as separate parts down the road for kitbashers, detailers, etc.  Watch our "Parts" page for more information.

Also, the gorgeous photo of GATX 7167, the car that spawned this thread, is indeed a GATC 1917-design 8000 gallon radial course tank car (i.e. the Tangent model).

Finally, on Wednesday of this week we will release the last very small batch of our original production 8,000 gallon GATC 1917-design tank cars, so if anyone missed out on getting those, please see our website this Wednesday.  These are cars from the original production that were late in getting to our warehouse (this batch will only include the 5 gorgeous RTR fully-painted and lettered paint schemes from our production announced at Trainfest in Milwaukee last November).

Best wishes,

David Lehlbach
Tangent Scale Models


   Thank you Dennis and David. This is good info to have. I'm embarrassed to note, David, that I
hadn't even noticed it on the two of your tank cars I have.

Cordially, Don Valentine



destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <mike_schleigh@...> wrote :



What is it about this particular gear made it so applicable to tank cars?  Was it also applied to other cars?  I have not looked yet but I do not recall it turning up in other illustrations, drawings, or models of other cars.  Why was it a tank car favorite?
===================

It wasn't. It was just another of many options the railroad / fleet owner had for equipping their cars. They were likely used just as much under other types of cars, but the distinctive springs are much harder to see under other car types.

One thing to note, starting with the USRA designs of the WWI era, and continuing until at least the 1943 AAR cars, ALL the standard designs incorporated the slotted center sill required for a Cardwell instillation.  Therefore, Cardwell draft gear could be fitted to any of these cars, or not; buyer's option. The slots are typically not called out on the general arrangement drawings, but they are there.

Dennis Storzek