Modeling A Hot Box


thecitrusbelt@...
 

As some of you know, State Highway 99 in the California Central Valley still parallels the former Southern Pacific (now UP) mainline in many areas. Years ago while traveling that route I saw a hotbox on an SP beet train going in my same direction.

 

It was quite a sight with bright flames and sparks shooting from a damaged journal, trailing black and gray smoke for a hundred yards or more.

 

I've though about modeling a lot of things but never a hotbox...until now.

 

The First Quarter 2017 issue of the free on-line NYC Modeler has a detailed, richly illustrated article by Dean Apostal on just such a project, starting on Page 29. Here is the link:

 

https://nycshs.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/nycentralmodeler_2016_4q2.pdf

 

And to see a hotbox on a model freight train, check out this link:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1z969DN_gjE

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

For more background information, I wrote an article for the Oct 2016 issue on hot boxes in the free online Model Railroad Hobbyist magazine (http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/ )



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 9:05 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Modeling A Hot Box








As some of you know, State Highway 99 in the California Central Valley still parallels the former Southern Pacific (now UP) mainline in many areas. Years ago while traveling that route I saw a hotbox on an SP beet train going in my same direction.



It was quite a sight with bright flames and sparks shooting from a damaged journal, trailing black and gray smoke for a hundred yards or more.



I've though about modeling a lot of things but never a hotbox...until now.



The First Quarter 2017 issue of the free on-line NYC Modeler has a detailed, richly illustrated article by Dean Apostal on just such a project, starting on Page 29. Here is the link:



<https://nycshs.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/nycentralmodeler_2016_4q2.pdf> https://nycshs.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/nycentralmodeler_2016_4q2.pdf



And to see a hotbox on a model freight train, check out this link:



<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1z969DN_gjE> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1z969DN_gjE



Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Michael Gross
 

I enjoyed the original article in the New York Central Modeler, as well as Jack Burgess’ article in Model Railroad Hobbiest.  I witnessed several hot boxes on the former AT&SF and when working on the C&NW, and they could be quite a sight, complete with smoke and, in the case of burning waste, emitting actual flames.

Mr. Burgess’ article also makes mention of the fact that a hot box could give off quite a smell, and I recall that one way to notify a crew on a passing caboose that there was a hot box in their consist was to hold one’s nose and point toward the front of the train. 


Charles Peck
 

I'm not sure I can follow all the directions for casting a translucent red wheel.  Anybody here casting some that
might sell me one? Contact offline please...
Chuck Peck     email    LNNRR152@...

On Tue, Mar 21, 2017 at 12:04 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

As some of you know, State Highway 99 in the California Central Valley still parallels the former Southern Pacific (now UP) mainline in many areas. Years ago while traveling that route I saw a hotbox on an SP beet train going in my same direction.

 

It was quite a sight with bright flames and sparks shooting from a damaged journal, trailing black and gray smoke for a hundred yards or more.

 

I've though about modeling a lot of things but never a hotbox...until now.

 

The First Quarter 2017 issue of the free on-line NYC Modeler has a detailed, richly illustrated article by Dean Apostal on just such a project, starting on Page 29. Here is the link:

 

https://nycshs.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/nycentralmodeler_2016_4q2.pdf

 

And to see a hotbox on a model freight train, check out this link:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1z969DN_gjE

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Craig Wilson
 

We do have a figure of a station agent modified such that he is holding his nose with one hand and pointing to the track with the other.  I've got a picture of him "in action" on the Atlantic Great Eastern.  I'll see if I can get it uploaded to the photos section.

Engineers are instructed to watch for the agent on the platform doing a roll-by inspection as they pass an open station.  Most of the time it is a figure giving a highball signal but every once in a while it's the guy indicating a hotbox.  In that case, the engineer had better well stop and have the train inspected.

Craig Wilson


destorzek@...
 

Oh boy, now we can get into varieties of "hotboxes". While the word "hotbox" has entered the general language and is somewhat understood by most lay people as a burning bearing, the glowing wheel in the modeling article is really indicative of another common problem... sticking brakes, or a car in the consist with it's handbrake on. And... there was a distinctive hand signal to indicate this when seen during a roll-by inspection in the days before radio; both hands held out in front of the body, the palm of one rubbing the back of the other, to indicate the brake shoe rubbing on the wheel.

Modern day "talking hotbox detectors" will respond to both, since all they are is a heat sensor placed close to the rail. They also respond quite often to the heat of an excursion engine's firebox going by.

In keeping with the era this list is supposed to be discussing, I might point out that the engineer would have a rather hard time seeing the agent doing the roll-by, since the engineer was already past him. The agent would typically start signaling the problem as soon as he saw it, but was most likely to be seen by the crew in the caboose. In the days before radio, if the engineer wasn't looking back for a 'highball' from the caboose, the crew would have to start 'pulling the air' to get his attention.

Dennis Storzek


mrprksr <mrprksr@...>
 

How would an agent know if there was a hot box 50-75 cars or more from the head end?    It is up to the  rear end crew to watch for agent.......With 42 years as a conductor there were alot of different signals.....Holding your nose was a sign for hot box.....rubbing your hands together was for sticking brakes/sliding wheels.........the general location in the train was given by rubbing head for head end.....belly for middle and butt for rear......Radio changed all that.....Larry Mennie


On Friday, March 24, 2017 10:57 AM, "agecompanyphotog@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:


 
We do have a figure of a station agent modified such that he is holding his nose with one hand and pointing to the track with the other.  I've got a picture of him "in action" on the Atlantic Great Eastern.  I'll see if I can get it uploaded to the photos section.

Engineers are instructed to watch for the agent on the platform doing a roll-by inspection as they pass an open station.  Most of the time it is a figure giving a highball signal but every once in a while it's the guy indicating a hotbox.  In that case, the engineer had better well stop and have the train inspected.

Craig Wilson



richard haave
 

Section foreman four miles out of town called the agent on the message phone and told him about the hotbox. 

Rear end was doing intense meditation and didn't see section mans stop signal


Dick Haave  (AGE extra board)