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ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia


Schuyler Larrabee
 

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).

 

Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles.  That’s not what they are called.  The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.

 

The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”

 

Schuyler

 


Greg Martin
 

Schuyler/
 
 
They will let you go in and edit it. I agree I have never heard them called stringers and actually I have only ever heard them called stiles.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 4/5/2017 3:34:37 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).

Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles.  That’s not what they are called.  The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.

The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”

Schuyler


Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).

 

Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles.  That’s not what they are called.  The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.

 

The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”

 

Schuyler

============


I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.


Dennis Storzek

 


Schuyler Larrabee
 

Dennis opines:

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Well, yes, that’s correct about DOORS, but we’re talking about ladders. But I do agree about using stiles for the vertical parts of a ladder. And ladders have rungs.





Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 10:26 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia









---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).



Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles. That’s not what they are called. The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.



The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”



Schuyler

============



I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.



Dennis Storzek







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Jeff Coleman
 

AAR Field Manual
Rule 79
Lists Ladder Treads.
Ladders complete, includes two side rails or stiles and treads.

Rule 83
Qualifer PE, Ladder Tread
Qualifer PD, Ladder Stile Bracket

Jeff Coleman


On Apr 6, 2017 10:55 AM, "'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Dennis opines:

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Well, yes, that’s correct about DOORS, but we’re talking about ladders. But I do agree about using stiles for the vertical parts of a ladder. And ladders have rungs.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 10:26 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

---In STMFC@..., wrote :

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).

Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles. That’s not what they are called. The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.

The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”

Schuyler

============

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Dennis Storzek

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Dave Parker
 

FWIW, there is an American Ladder Institute.  They only seem to use the term (side) rail.  I did not see stringer or stile in their list of recognized terms.




Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


On Thursday, April 6, 2017 7:51 AM, "'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Dennis opines:

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Well, yes, that’s correct about DOORS, but we’re talking about ladders. But I do agree about using stiles for the vertical parts of a ladder. And ladders have rungs.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 10:26 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

---In STMFC@..., wrote :

The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK).

Guys, it’s been driving me nuts to read about ladder styles. That’s not what they are called. The vertical parts are stringers, rails or stiles.

The horizontal parts are called “rungs.”

Schuyler

============

I would think the preferred term would be "stiles". That would be consistent with architectural usage, where the vertical members of a door or sash are stiles, while the horizontals are rails.

Dennis Storzek

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




Tom Madden
 

And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....


Tom Madden


rwitt_2000
 

The 1912 CBD has the following definitions:

Ladder Round: A round cross bar or step of a ladder.

Ladder Side Rails: The vertical side pieces to which the ladders rounds are attached.

In the definition of a ladder it states that "The individual bars, whether of wood or iron, and whether round or square, are termed ladder rounds."

Bob Witt


Jeff Coleman
 

The FRA also refers ladders as stiles and treads made of wood, iron or steel.

Jeff Coleman


On Apr 6, 2017 12:47 PM, "rwitt_2000@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

The 1912 CBD has the following definitions:

Ladder Round: A round cross bar or step of a ladder.

Ladder Side Rails: The vertical side pieces to which the ladders rounds are attached.

In the definition of a ladder it states that "The individual bars, whether of wood or iron, and whether round or square, are termed ladder rounds."

Bob Witt



Dave Nelson
 

It’s still early in 2017 but I have no reservations about nominating Tom’s post as The Post of the Year.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 8:57 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

 

 

And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....

Tom Madden




Schuyler Larrabee
 

Yeah, sure, but there IS a difference between stiles and styles. That was my main point.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 11:57 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia





And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....



Tom Madden


gary laakso
 

Perhaps, it needs a “don’t tread on me” sticker attached to it.

 

Gary Laakso

south of Mike Brock

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 6, 2017 2:36 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

 

 

It’s still early in 2017 but I have no reservations about nominating Tom’s post as The Post of the Year.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 8:57 AM
To:
STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

 

 

And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....

Tom Madden





John Barry
 

Extra STYLE points for using STILES?
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, April 6, 2017 3:08 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

 
Yeah, sure, but there IS a difference between stiles and styles. That was my main point.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 11:57 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ladder nomenclature - from Wikipedia

And the list of things we take way too seriously continues to grow.....

Tom Madden

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

Yeah, sure, but there IS a difference between stiles and styles. That was my main point.


Schuyler
==================

Problem es, spellin' as gone all ta 'ell dees days.

Dennis Storzek


Dave Parker
 

For those who are finding this thread tedious, I would politely suggest that you avail yourself of that little button labeled DELETE.  Your expression of disinterest does not really add anything to the conversation.

Speaking only for myself, I do find the nomenclature interesting because it reflects how the Cycs evolved (or not) over time, as well as how the safety appliance standards were phased into them. 

Regarding Bob Witt's comments, those terms (ladder rounds and ladder side rails) date to at least the 1903 Cyc, and likely earlier.  The same definition appears in the glossary section until at last 1922 (I am away from my 1931, but I would guess it's unchanged).

Starting in 1912, there is a long Safety Appliances section that is also located within the glossary section.  Here, the corresponding terms are ladder treads and stiles (no rungs).  It also gives all the relevant details concerning tread spacing, distance from the car-end, etc. that were required by the 1911 SAA .  Starting with the 1922, the SA section was moved into a separate section closer to the back of the book, and retains the tread-stile nomenclature.

This is not the first time that I have found an internal discrepancy in the MCB-ARA nomenclature.  They seemed reluctant to edit pre-existing text when they introduced new standards.  Of course they lacked word-processors, but I wonder if it actually had more to do with the effort of introducing minor legislative changes at the annual MCB/ARA meetings.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA




Jared Harper
 




---In STMFC@..., <destorzek@...> wrote :




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

Yeah, sure, but there IS a difference between stiles and styles. That was my main point.


Schuyler
==================

Problem es, spellin' as gone all ta 'ell dees days.8>)

Dennis Storzek