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Running Boards Replacements (Sorry, No Ladder Talk In This Post)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

This photo link is from the Chicago and North Western Railway Archives Art Collections.

 

It shows running boards that have been replaced over time. I'm sure it has been noted here previously but this would be a good detail to model.

 

https://pixels.com/featured/freight-train-headed-away-from-navy-pier-chicago-and-north-western-historical-society.html

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Eric Hansmann
 

I first saw a model version of this in 2005 at a mini-RPM Bill Welch hosted in northern Virginia. Bill had replacement running boards on several reefer models that were unpainted or a slightly different shade of the roof color. His work influenced my efforts on many models since then. I usually just paint a portion of the running board casting, which is different from Bill’s method of replacing the casting with strip wood. Both methods work and the effect is frequently noted when the models are displayed.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 06, 2017 2:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Running Boards Replacements (Sorry, No Ladder Talk In This Post)

 




This photo link is from the Chicago and North Western Railway Archives Art Collections.

 

It shows running boards that have been replaced over time. I'm sure it has been noted here previously but this would be a good detail to model.

 

https://pixels.com/featured/freight-train-headed-away-from-navy-pier-chicago-and-north-western-historical-society.html

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


rwitt_2000
 

Bill Welch
 

PanPastels were wonderfully for this. On about every third model I build I will scratch build the running board and latitudinals using Mt.Albert scale 1x6 wood strips. I will find some photos of how I do this and post them via Dropbox.

Bill Welch

Dave Parker
 

I think the way the roof panels are blistering (and corroding?) is equally interesting.  I recall a discussion a few months back on trying to achieve this look in HO, but of course can't find any notes that I might have taken.  I have a very vague recollection of table salt?  Or maybe hairspray?  Can somebody jog my feeble short-term memory?

Thanks in advance.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA




On Thursday, April 6, 2017 2:06 PM, "fgexbill@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
PanPastels were wonderfully for this. On about every third model I build I will scratch build the running board and latitudinals using Mt.Albert scale 1x6 wood strips. I will find some photos of how I do this and post them via Dropbox.

Bill Welch


Bill Welch
 

I am playing with Morton "Coarse Kosher Salt" sprinkling it on randomly—which I am finding to be very subjective, I mean how can one be intentionally random?!—then spritzing on water and letting it dry. This sort of tacks the salt on enough to stay on while airbrushing. Then take a fairly stiff brush and knock the salt off.

Finding a happy medium between too much and too little is subjective too. There are lot a of Videos on YuoTube about both salt and hairspray, which I have not tried yet. One source swore by the Morton "Coarse Kosher Salt" which is why I am using it. The 16oz. container will go a long way at my pace.

The Resin Car Works modeling blog has some photos of various modelers experiments. I strongly suggest people log onto YuoTube and check the various resources there. Lots of good stuff there by modelers of all kinds.

Bill Welch
 

Michael Gross
 

Thanks much, Bob. I did not know this gallery existed, and as I worked in engine service for the C&NW in 1967, it brought back some great memories.

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

StephenK
 

I have had some success with this method, although I spray the water FIRST, then sprinkle.   You can move the grains around a little with the non-business end of a brush, then let dry.

Steve KY