Topics

Car Types for a Brown & Haley Candy Factory

gary laakso
 

The Milwaukee Road served the Brown & Haley candy factory in Tacoma, WA, a substantial building of maybe 5 stories and there is a partial picture of it on page 43 of A Northwest Rail Pictorial  II using pictures from Warren W. Wing.

 

Boxcars would have delivered bagged sugar and most other ingredients, though maybe a refrigerator car for creams.  The packaging materials would likely also be delivered by boxcars.  Assuming that this or other similar candy factories shipped out to small stores on line crates of candies, they likely would have gone REA, unless a large a distributor needed LCL service.  Flavorings could have moved via refrigerator cars returning for further loads.  Would cocoa beans be delivered in refrigerator cars acting as insulated boxcars returning to their home road? 

 

Would such factories have their own power plant or would they have used the local grid?  It could be a function of the age of machinery in the plant: steam v. electric? 

 

Gary Laakso thinking of candies while working on tax forms

South of Mike Brock

erieblt2
 

We have a model of the factory on out layout.  See PSMRE website.  Sorry, its truck served! Bill S.


From: "'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, April 10, 2017 3:05:49 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Car Types for a Brown & Haley Candy Factory

 


The Milwaukee Road served the Brown & Haley candy factory in Tacoma, WA, a substantial building of maybe 5 stories and there is a partial picture of it on page 43 of A Northwest Rail Pictorial  II using pictures from Warren W. Wing.

 

Boxcars would have delivered bagged sugar and most other ingredients, though maybe a refrigerator car for creams.  The packaging materials would likely also be delivered by boxcars.  Assuming that this or other similar candy factories shipped out to small stores on line crates of candies, they likely would have gone REA, unless a large a distributor needed LCL service.  Flavorings could have moved via refrigerator cars returning for further loads.  Would cocoa beans be delivered in refrigerator cars acting as insulated boxcars returning to their home road? 

 

Would such factories have their own power plant or would they have used the local grid?  It could be a function of the age of machinery in the plant: steam v. electric? 

 

Gary Laakso thinking of candies while working on tax forms

South of Mike Brock



Paul Krueger
 

The Milwaukee tried to hit the factory with locomotives and freight cars more than a few times!

Paul

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA

Tim O'Connor
 

Gary

Cocoa beans did not need refrigeration or insulation. Hershey had insulated
cars for its PRODUCTS, which did need insulation. Deliveries to the candy factory
should include packaging (specialty cardboard papers), inks (for decorating candy
boxes), sugars (cane sugar or syrup, or corn syrup), fats (butter, oils), possibly
milk (for milk chocolate) and the other ingredients (chocolate, flavorings). A large
candy producer certainly could generate carloads, but LCL sounds right for a small
factory.

Tim O'

The Milwaukee Road served the Brown & Haley candy factory in Tacoma, WA, a substantial building of maybe 5 stories and there is a partial picture of it on page 43 of A Northwest Rail Pictorial II using pictures from Warren W. Wing.

Boxcars would have delivered bagged sugar and most other ingredients, though maybe a refrigerator car for creams. The packaging materials would likely also be delivered by boxcars. Assuming that this or other similar candy factories shipped out to small stores on line crates of candies, they likely would have gone REA, unless a large a distributor needed LCL service. Flavorings could have moved via refrigerator cars returning for further loads. Would cocoa beans be delivered in refrigerator cars acting as insulated boxcars returning to their home road?

Would such factories have their own power plant or would they have used the local grid? It could be a function of the age of machinery in the plant: steam v. electric?

Gary Laakso thinking of candies while working on tax forms
South of Mike Brock

Jeffrey White
 

Gary,

I can't speak for Brown and Haley, but I've done a lot of research on Hollywood Brands Candy in Centralia, IL. They made the $100,000 bar and I think the Zero candy bar.�

It was built in a large building that was previously an envelope factory.� It was served by the IC and it had it's own power plant.� I have a photograph of express reefers spotted at the plant in the era covered by this list.�� I have been unable to find out if they routinely shipped the product in express reefers though.� I don't know what the shelf life of the candy was in those days.� Perhaps it had to go by express service?

Jeff White

Alma, IL


On 4/10/2017 5:05 PM, 'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC] wrote:
�

The Milwaukee Road served the Brown & Haley candy factory in Tacoma, WA, a substantial building of maybe 5 stories and there is a partial picture of it on page 43 of A Northwest Rail Pictorial� II using pictures from Warren W. Wing.

�

Boxcars would have delivered bagged sugar and most other ingredients, though maybe a refrigerator car for creams.� The packaging materials would likely also be delivered by boxcars.� Assuming that this or other similar candy factories shipped out to small stores on line crates of candies, they likely would have gone REA, unless a large a distributor needed LCL service.� Flavorings could have moved via refrigerator cars returning for further loads.� Would cocoa beans be delivered in refrigerator cars acting as insulated boxcars returning to their home road?�

�

Would such factories have their own power plant or would they have used the local grid?� It could be a function of the age of machinery in the plant: steam v. electric?�

�

Gary Laakso thinking of candies while working on tax forms

South of Mike Brock


SUVCWORR@...
 

Jeff,

I would think heat in the summer melting the bars was more of an issue than shelf life.   RBL cars did not yet exist.  Reefers where used to keep the contents cool just from all the insulation.  Express reefers reduced the likelyhood of the car standing in multiple yards and the load being lost.

Rich Orr


Tim O'Connor
 


Say WHAT?? There was no such thing as an insulated box car (i.e. RB bunkerless reefer) ???

I have shots of wood sheathed steam era Hershey's RB's. The "L" refers to loading devices, which
really came into their own with forklifts and pallets. Prior to that time loads were braced or packed in
such a way to avoid load shifting.

Tim O'




Jeff,

I would think heat in the summer melting the bars was more of an issue than shelf life.   RBL cars did not yet exist.  Reefers where used to keep the contents cool just from all the insulation.  Express reefers reduced the likelyhood of the car standing in multiple yards and the load being lost.

Rich Orr

gary laakso
 

Thanks, Tim O’!

 

Gary Laakso

south of Mike Brock

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, April 10, 2017 6:54 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Car Types for a Brown & Haley Candy Factory

 

 

Gary

Cocoa beans did not need refrigeration or insulation. Hershey had insulated
cars for its PRODUCTS, which did need insulation. Deliveries to the candy factory
should include packaging (specialty cardboard papers), inks (for decorating candy
boxes), sugars (cane sugar or syrup, or corn syrup), fats (butter, oils), possibly
milk (for milk chocolate) and the other ingredients (chocolate, flavorings). A large
candy producer certainly could generate carloads, but LCL sounds right for a small
factory.

Tim O'

>The Milwaukee Road served the Brown & Haley candy factory in Tacoma, WA, a substantial building of maybe 5 stories and there is a partial picture of it on page 43 of A Northwest Rail Pictorial II using pictures from Warren W. Wing.
>
>Boxcars would have delivered bagged sugar and most other ingredients, though maybe a refrigerator car for creams. The packaging materials would likely also be delivered by boxcars. Assuming that this or other similar candy factories shipped out to small stores on line crates of candies, they likely would have gone REA, unless a large a distributor needed LCL service. Flavorings could have moved via refrigerator cars returning for further loads. Would cocoa beans be delivered in refrigerator cars acting as insulated boxcars returning to their home road?
>
>Would such factories have their own power plant or would they have used the local grid? It could be a function of the age of machinery in the plant: steam v. electric?
>
>Gary Laakso thinking of candies while working on tax forms
>South of Mike Brock

Bill Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Gary,

I would think that cream would be locally sources and would arrive via a motor carrier and not on the rails. I also do not believe that cocoa beans would require insulated shipment. Most likely these are shipped in bags. If this was coming in off of freighters at the Port of Tacoma, these may also have been shipped via motor carrier. Not knowing exactly where the candy plant was/is in relationship with the port this could also be a rather short railroad move. 

As for utilities powering the plant, I will leave that up to those that know the territory better than I.

Cheers & Happy Modeling,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA



On Apr 10, 2017, at 3:05 PM, 'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


The Milwaukee Road served the Brown & Haley candy factory in Tacoma, WA, a substantial building of maybe 5 stories and there is a partial picture of it on page 43 of A Northwest Rail Pictorial  II using pictures from Warren W. Wing.

 

Boxcars would have delivered bagged sugar and most other ingredients, though maybe a refrigerator car for creams.  The packaging materials would likely also be delivered by boxcars.  Assuming that this or other similar candy factories shipped out to small stores on line crates of candies, they likely would have gone REA, unless a large a distributor needed LCL service.  Flavorings could have moved via refrigerator cars returning for further loads.  Would cocoa beans be delivered in refrigerator cars acting as insulated boxcars returning to their home road?  

 

Would such factories have their own power plant or would they have used the local grid?  It could be a function of the age of machinery in the plant: steam v. electric?  

 

Gary Laakso thinking of candies while working on tax forms

South of Mike Brock



Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <vasa0vasa@...> wrote :

 

 

Would such factories have their own power plant or would they have used the local grid?  It could be a function of the age of machinery in the plant: steam v. electric? 

 

Gary Laakso thinking of candies while working on tax forms

South of Mike Brock

======================


Likely not a power plant for electric generation... and steam powered line shafts were history in the WWI era in most industries. But food processing needs lots of steam; for the cooking kettles, and also hot water and steam for cleaning the equipment. Not sure oil fired power boilers were all that common before the late fifties, and coal was available up there.


Dennis Storzek

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <timboconnor@...> wrote :


Say WHAT?? There was no such thing as an insulated box car (i.e. RB bunkerless reefer) ???

I have shots of wood sheathed steam era Hershey's RB's. The "L" refers to loading devices, which
really came into their own with forklifts and pallets. Prior to that time loads were braced or packed in
such a way to avoid load shifting.

Tim O'
=======================

Yeah, but Hershey was a huge company, that ran their own car fleet. Hop in your time machine, try ordering an RB from the local railroad and see what you get.

Dennis Storzek

Tim O'Connor
 


Yeah, but Hershey was a huge company, that ran their own car fleet. Hop in your time machine,
try ordering an RB from the local railroad and see what you get. Dennis Storzek


Dennis

? Is that really the same question ? RB's were around in the 1930's for wine, beer, chocolate, and other
products. I don't know of any in railroad company service (were there XI's?)  but maybe there were some.

In the 1930's if you needed an insulated box car, you used a reefer most of the time. I think it was Tony (or
someone) who said that 20% or so of PFE carloadings were non-refrigerated items.

But a candy company could BUY Hershey's Chocolate - in fact, BULK cocoa and chocolates are definitely
types of product sold by Hershey's to third parties - chocolate OEM's if you will. These might arrive in HERX
RB insulated box cars.

Tim O'Connor

rwitt_2000
 

FWIW the NH and BAR "potato" cars from the early 1950s were classed XIH so they were considered a box car insulated with heaters. I can't recall other examples.

Here's a link to a NHRATA forum discussion about these cars:

http://thenhrhtanewhavenrailroadforum.yuku.com/topic/8135#.WOxTrY61tmA


Bob Witt

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <rwitt_2000@...> wrote :

FWIW the NH and BAR "potato" cars from the early 1950s were classed XIH so they were considered a box car insulated with heaters. I can't recall other examples.

Bob Witt
================
The Soo Line insulated some 40' wood sheathed automobile cars in the fifties, which made them XI's; ten in 1954 for use in wet pulp service (so the bales wouldn't freeze to the cars.) and 15 in 1958 with wood plug doors(!) assigned to Campbell Soup Co.

Dennis Storzek

Bruce Smith
 

On Apr 10, 2017, at 8:36 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

---In STMFC@..., <timboconnor@...> wrote :


Say WHAT?? There was no such thing as an insulated box car (i.e. RB bunkerless reefer) ???

I have shots of wood sheathed steam era Hershey's RB's. The "L" refers to loading devices, which
really came into their own with forklifts and pallets. Prior to that time loads were braced or packed in
such a way to avoid load shifting.

Tim O’

Dennis replied:

Yeah, but Hershey was a huge company, that ran their own car fleet. Hop in your time machine, try ordering an RB from the local railroad and see what you get.

This also emphasizes the importance of understanding assigned service.  While smaller companies might not have the financial ability to buy their own cars, if they had enough traffic to require cars, they might well enter into an agreement with a car owner to provide cars for them. As Dennis notes, RBs would be unlikely to be seen waiting assignment at a yard somewhere, but that certainly doesn’t preclude either their use or their presence.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith            
Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



Donald B. Valentine
 






---In STMFC@..., <wakeene@...> wrote :

Gary,

I would think that cream would be locally sources and would arrive via a motor carrier and not on the rails. I also do not believe that cocoa beans would require insulated shipment. Most likely these are shipped in bags. If this was coming in off of freighters at the Port of Tacoma, these may also have been shipped via motor carrier. Not knowing exactly where the candy plant was/is in relationship with the port this could also be a rather short railroad move. 

As for utilities powering the plant, I will leave that up to those that know the territory better than I.

Cheers & Happy Modeling,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


Hi folks,

    My mother retired after some 15 years as the in house industrial nurse for Deran's Confectionary, 
a large candy factory in Lechmere Sq., East Cambridge, Mass. ultimately bought by Bordens. For
me it was a great place to earn a few bucks helping out in the shipping room during short college
vacation periods. Cocoa beans were received at the plant in large bags made of very thick burlap, 
far heavier than what was used for animal feeds when I was a kid on a dairy farm in the late 1940's
and early 1950's. IIRC correctly these bags were quite a bit more than 100 lb. bags and were
palletized as received so they could be handled with a fork lift. Though within three hundred yards
of B&M tracks in the East Somerville Yards there was no rail service to the plant. Thus everything
that came in or went out moved by truck. The plant had a warehouse on Atlantic Ave. in Boston that 
was served by the Union Freight Rwy. and was switched largely at night. Other than a team track in
the Somerville Yards the warehouse was Deran's only access to rail. 

Cordially, Don Valentine



On Apr 10, 2017, at 3:05 PM, 'gary laakso' vasa0vasa@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


The Milwaukee Road served the Brown & Haley candy factory in Tacoma, WA, a substantial building of maybe 5 stories and there is a partial picture of it on page 43 of A Northwest Rail Pictorial  II using pictures from Warren W. Wing.

 

Boxcars would have delivered bagged sugar and most other ingredients, though maybe a refrigerator car for creams.  The packaging materials would likely also be delivered by boxcars.  Assuming that this or other similar candy factories shipped out to small stores on line crates of candies, they likely would have gone REA, unless a large a distributor needed LCL service.  Flavorings could have moved via refrigerator cars returning for further loads.  Would cocoa beans be delivered in refrigerator cars acting as insulated boxcars returning to their home road?  

 

Would such factories have their own power plant or would they have used the local grid?  It could be a function of the age of machinery in the plant: steam v. electric?  

 

Gary Laakso thinking of candies while working on tax forms

South of Mike Brock



Tom Vanwormer
 

Folks,
If look back before 1900 outwest many of the railroads moved beer across the land in insulated box cars, actually reefers without ice bunkers.  These insulated cars had reefer type door and lots of kegs or containers with glass beer bottles and were very common here in Colorado. 

Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

On Apr 10, 2017, at 8:36 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

---In STMFC@..., wrote :


Say WHAT?? There was no such thing as an insulated box car (i.e. RB bunkerless reefer) ???

I have shots of wood sheathed steam era Hershey's RB's. The "L" refers to loading devices, which
really came into their own with forklifts and pallets. Prior to that time loads were braced or packed in
such a way to avoid load shifting.

Tim O’

Dennis replied:

Yeah, but Hershey was a huge company, that ran their own car fleet. Hop in your time machine, try ordering an RB from the local railroad and see what you get.

This also emphasizes the importance of understanding assigned service.  While smaller companies might not have the financial ability to buy their own cars, if they had enough traffic to require cars, they might well enter into an agreement with a car owner to provide cars for them. As Dennis notes, RBs would be unlikely to be seen waiting assignment at a yard somewhere, but that certainly doesn’t preclude either their use or their presence.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith            
Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



Fred_Swa@...
 

Salinas, Ca had chocolate factories Nestle and Peter Paul to name two.  There seemed to always have a tank car at their plant. mostly SP with the S and diamond on the dome.  It was made noticeable the few times there wasn't one.  They shipped in syrup even though Spreckels the town and factory wasn't 2 miles it was so close.
Fred Swanson

James E Kubanick
 

During the early-mid 1950's I lived near the D.L.Clark Company, makers of the Clark Bar and located on Pittsburgh's North Side.. At that time, I would often see some very colorful cars coming out of PRR's Island Avenue yard, destined for this plant, a short distance away. There were Baker's Chocolate insulated tank cars dressed in white and Baker's logo, and two bay covered hoppers painted in Jack Frost Sugars  blue and white colors and their logo.

The plant, itself, was an interesting structure as their siding off the PRR was on the second story and crossed a local street on a girder bridge that went directly into the plant.

Jim Kubanick
Morgantown




On Tuesday, April 11, 2017 10:31 PM, "Fred_Swa@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Salinas, Ca had chocolate factories Nestle and Peter Paul to name two.  There seemed to always have a tank car at their plant. mostly SP with the S and diamond on the dome.  It was made noticeable the few times there wasn't one.  They shipped in syrup even though Spreckels the town and factory wasn't 2 miles it was so close.
Fred Swanson


Tony Thompson
 

Jim Kubanick wrote:

 
During the early-mid 1950's I lived near the D.L.Clark Company, makers of the Clark Bar and located on Pittsburgh's North Side.

   Ah yes, makers of the Clark Bar, one of my very favorite candy bars. And of course very associated with Pittsburgh for me.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history