Pressure regulators for airbrushing


Andy Carlson
 

Hi-
Back in the 1980s I acquired a 20 pound CO2 bottle and a Badger single gauge regulator. I am 100% satisfied with the whole unit's operation, and I am impressed at the simplicity and ease to set the operating pressure.

I have recently acquired acquired another 20 pound CO2 bottle and a different make of regulator. This regulator has 2 gauges--one for bottle pressure (0-3000 PSI) and a 2nd gauge for the regulated output pressure of 0-300 PSI.

I am reminded of the old days of a 9000 RPM tachometer in a car with 5000 RPM shift points. The usable range of RPMs is but a portion of the tach face, making small increments harder to read. With the 2nd pressure regulator, the range in which I would use is 15-30 PSI, but the sweep area for that is difficult to ascertain as that range is just 1/4 " travel of the gauge's dial.

My question for those whom may be able to help is this: Do I just need another down-stream gauge for the regulator, or am I not using the correct regulator for my application. I wish to give this 2nd CO2 outfit to a long-time friend and would like him to be able to jump right in without any difficulties.

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

You should be able to simply replace the 0-300 psi pressure gauge with a 0-50 psi gauge or something similar. You just need to take the current gauge to the hardware store and add any fittings needed to mate the new gauge to the existing connection. I’m guessing that the only potential problem is to not open the 2nd regulator too far that you exceed the capacity of the pressure gauge.



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, April 24, 2017 5:18 PM
To: STMFC YahooGroup
Subject: [STMFC] Pressure regulators for airbrushing








Hi-

Back in the 1980s I acquired a 20 pound CO2 bottle and a Badger single gauge regulator. I am 100% satisfied with the whole unit's operation, and I am impressed at the simplicity and ease to set the operating pressure.



I have recently acquired acquired another 20 pound CO2 bottle and a different make of regulator. This regulator has 2 gauges--one for bottle pressure (0-3000 PSI) and a 2nd gauge for the regulated output pressure of 0-300 PSI.



I am reminded of the old days of a 9000 RPM tachometer in a car with 5000 RPM shift points. The usable range of RPMs is but a portion of the tach face, making small increments harder to read. With the 2nd pressure regulator, the range in which I would use is 15-30 PSI, but the sweep area for that is difficult to ascertain as that range is just 1/4 " travel of the gauge's dial.



My question for those whom may be able to help is this: Do I just need another down-stream gauge for the regulator, or am I not using the correct regulator for my application. I wish to give this 2nd CO2 outfit to a long-time friend and would like him to be able to jump right in without any difficulties.



Thanks,

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Charles Peck
 

Andy, if you get in contact with an industrial gas distributor they should be able to modify your regulator
to better suit your needs. Replacing the 0-300 gauge with one reading 0-60 or 0-100 should help
quite a bit.  Most gas distributors either repair and maintain regulators or have contact with some firm
that does do that work.
Regards,
Chuck Peck in FL 

On Mon, Apr 24, 2017 at 8:17 PM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi-
Back in the 1980s I acquired a 20 pound CO2 bottle and a Badger single gauge regulator. I am 100% satisfied with the whole unit's operation, and I am impressed at the simplicity and ease to set the operating pressure.

I have recently acquired acquired another 20 pound CO2 bottle and a different make of regulator. This regulator has 2 gauges--one for bottle pressure (0-3000 PSI) and a 2nd gauge for the regulated output pressure of 0-300 PSI.

I am reminded of the old days of a 9000 RPM tachometer in a car with 5000 RPM shift points. The usable range of RPMs is but a portion of the tach face, making small increments harder to read. With the 2nd pressure regulator, the range in which I would use is 15-30 PSI, but the sweep area for that is difficult to ascertain as that range is just 1/4 " travel of the gauge's dial.

My question for those whom may be able to help is this: Do I just need another down-stream gauge for the regulator, or am I not using the correct regulator for my application. I wish to give this 2nd CO2 outfit to a long-time friend and would like him to be able to jump right in without any difficulties.

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



frograbbit602
 

Andy I use a CO2 bottle with regulator. My bottle is only five pound so I have to exchange it or have it filled more often than your twenty pound.  The places I have it filled ( in MN Toll or Minneapolis Oxygen ) both sell various regulators ( I have  0 to 60 ) and can replace the one you have with another.  I am sure your CO2  suppliers can do the same.
Lester Breuer


Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 4/25/2017 5:09 AM, frograbbit602@... [STMFC] wrote:

Andy I use a CO2 bottle with regulator

    I always thought that nitrogen was the gas to use if airbrushing?  Too costly?
-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Jon,

Either gas would work. CO2 has the advantage that it is more easily available and inexpensive.
 
Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA


On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 7:57 AM, "Jon Miller atsfus@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
On 4/25/2017 5:09 AM, frograbbit602@... [STMFC] wrote:

Andy I use a CO2 bottle with regulator

    I always thought that nitrogen was the gas to use if airbrushing?  Too costly?
--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS



Mansell Peter Hambly
 

I use diving air. It's dry and filtered.  In addition, the air is contained in diving tanks that are no longer in use by divers but they have to be hydro tested every five years.  The tank has two gauges, one that shows the amount of air remaining and the psi gauge.

Mansell Peter Hambly
COQUITLAM, B.C.


From: "STMFC"
To: "STMFC"
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:21:57 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

 

Jon,

Either gas would work. CO2 has the advantage that it is more easily available and inexpensive.
 
Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA


On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 7:57 AM, "Jon Miller atsfus@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
On 4/25/2017 5:09 AM, frograbbit602@... [STMFC] wrote:

Andy I use a CO2 bottle with regulator

    I always thought that nitrogen was the gas to use if airbrushing?
  Too costly?
--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS




Andy Carlson
 

Thanks for the wonderful responses. Most helpful. Once again I am in full appreciation of the range of knowledge and interests within this group's membership.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA








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